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Wwi

To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Man Who Invented Chemical Weapons

Sunday, May 03, 2015

One hundred years ago, Fritz Haber invented the first chemical weapon and convinced the German army to use it. His wife Clara, also a chemist, fiercely opposed her husband's project. When she couldn't stop it, she committed suicide. Judith Claire Mitchell tells the story in her tragic and yet funny novel "A Reunion of Ghosts."

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Fugitive Waves

20 – The Birth of Rice-A-Roni: The San Francisco, Italian, Armenian Treat

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

The Birth of Ricc-A-Roni: The San Francisco, Italian, Armenian Treat

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Singer Diamanda Galas: The 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide

Sunday, April 19, 2015

There are many ways to react to the tragedies of the past. Politically. Historically. And even… musically.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Novelist Remembers Armenian Massacre, 100 Years Later

Sunday, April 19, 2015

 Judith Claire MItchell's first novel  “The Last Day of the War” is set just after World War I, when Europe's peace brokers decided to ignore the Armenian massacres.  She talks about the painful legacy of that decision, 100 years later.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Instigators, and Losers, of The First World War

Monday, March 23, 2015

A WWI story from the perspectives of its instigators and losers, the Germans and Austro-Hungarians.

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Studio 360

Aleksandar Hemon: The Accordion

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Sarajevo native Aleksandar Hemon reimagines the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, where one of his relatives was standing on the sidelines holding his new accordion.

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The Takeaway

How the Borders of WWI Shape the Conflict in Iraq

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Boundaries created after WWI have led to many modern day conflicts, including the current struggle between Kurdish forces and the group that calls itself the Islamic State.  

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WQXR Features

Proms: BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra Remembers WWI

Friday, September 05, 2014

Listen to the archived broadcast of a BBC Proms program dedicated to remembering the First World War with music by Vaughan Williams, Butterworth and more.

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BackStory

Red Summer

Friday, August 22, 2014

With the American History Guys

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Studio 360

Five Things You Had to See Online This Week

Thursday, August 07, 2014

This week in “Thanks, Internet” — infographic violence, a moth's big moment, the real Uncle Sam, This day in TRL, and Lorde's "Royals" takes a rural victory lap.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Could Another World War Happen?

Monday, August 04, 2014

One hundred years after the start of World War I, New York Times columnist Roger Cohen examines how that conflict shaped the world today and argues that a war on that scale could happen again.

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The Takeaway

The Militarism That Led to World War I

Thursday, July 17, 2014

In the decades before World War I, the mass production of weaponry capable of damage and death on an unprecedented scale was developed. As a result, European militaries grew in size and influence, and took on an expanded role in civilian governments.

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The Takeaway

The Assassination That Changed The World

Friday, June 27, 2014

Although a century has passed since the Archduke Franz Ferdinand was fatally shot and WWI was triggered, we’re still grappling with the consequences today. How one death irrevocably changed the nature of conflict, peace, and international relations.  

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WQXR Blog

BBC Proms Festival to Commemorate WWI Centenary

Thursday, April 24, 2014

The world's biggest music festival will mark the 100th anniversary this summer of the outbreak of the World War I.

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The Takeaway

A World on The Edge: Echoes of 1914 in 2014

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Yesterday President Barack Obama promised to use the U.S. military to protect NATO nations against outside threats. "History has a funny way of moving in twists and turns, and not just in a straight line," he said. History also tends to repeat itself, as Margaret MacMillan, professor of history at Oxford University, knows well. She reflects on the fateful summer of 1914 and compares that century-old conflict to the current issues facing the West and Russia.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Starting World War I

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Margaret MacMillan, professor of international history at Oxford and the author of The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 (Random House, 2013), looks at the avoidable run-up to World War I and the misjudgments of European leaders who thought the war could be resolved quickly. The "Great War" lasted over four years and killed 16 million combatants and civilians.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Girl You Left Behind, by Jojo Moyes

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Jojo Moyes discusses her new novel, The Girl You Left Behind. Set in France in 1916, Edouard, an artist, leaves his young wife, Sophie, to fight at the front. When their small town falls to the Germans, Edouard’s portrait of Sophie draws the eye of the new Kommandant. As the officer’s dangerous obsession deepens, Sophie will risk everything to see her husband again.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Last of the Doughboys

Friday, August 30, 2013

Richard Rubin talks about finding and interviewing living American World War I veterans, aged 101 to 113, to capture their life stories before they died. The Last of the Doughboys is his decade-long odyssey to recover the stories of a forgotten generation and their experience in the Great War

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The CIA's Shadow War; Mary Williams; Philipp Meyer's The Son; Interviewing the Last WWI Veterans

Friday, August 30, 2013

We're replaying some favorite recent interviews. First, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Mark Mazzetti explains how the line between soldiers and spies has been blurred, and what that means for America’s national security. Mary Williams talks about growing up in the Black Panther movement and then being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Philipp Meyer describes his novel, The Son, set it Texas and spanning more than a century. And Richard Rubin discusses finding and interviewing find dozens of WWI veterans to capture their stories of the Great War before they died.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Last of the Doughboys

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Richard Rubin talks about finding and interviewing living American World War I veterans, aged 101 to 113, to capture their life stories before they died. The Last of the Doughboys is his decade-long odyssey to recover the stories of a forgotten generation and their experience in the Great War

Comments [6]