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Wrongful Conviction

WNYC News

City Settles with Three Wrongfully Convicted Men for $17 Million

Monday, January 12, 2015

New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer's effort to avoid expensive lawsuits over faulty convictions

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The Takeaway

Death Penalty Debate Rages After DNA Clears Two

Friday, September 05, 2014

More than 30 years after being sentenced to death, Henry Lee McCollum and his half-brother Leon Brown emerged from North Carolina prison doors on Wednesday as free men.

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WNYC News

Is $1 Million a Year Justice for the Wrongfully Imprisoned?

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Despite the $40 million settlement with the five men wrongfully convicted in the rape of a jogger in Central Park in 1989, there's no formula for how we compensate people imprisoned for crimes they didn't commit.

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The Takeaway

Is This America's Unluckiest Man?

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Dwayne Provience was wrongfully convicted and spent almost 10 years in prison before being freed. He was awarded a $5 million settlement, but then the city of Detroit filed for bankruptcy and he never received compensation.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Making It Right for Wrongful Convictions

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The Brooklyn DA is reviewing 50 cases that may have involved coached witnesses, coerced confessions, and other abuses of justice. Lonnie Soury, president of the advocacy organization FalseConfessions.org, talks about the investigation and the allegations against a Brooklyn detective, and Derrick Hamilton, who served 21 years in prison for murder, discusses his efforts to prove that he was set up by the detective whose cases are now under investigation.

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WNYC News

Did The NYPD Push A Mentally Ill Man To Falsely Confess To Murder?

Monday, December 23, 2013

WNYC

Despite promising to start videotaping interrogations, the NYPD didn't. Now we might never know what really happened to Etan Patz.

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WNYC News

Missing: A Boy and the Evidence Against His Accused Killer

Monday, December 23, 2013

Three decades after 6-year-old Etan Patz disappeared, police suddenly had a suspect. Then they chose not to record his interrogation, a decision that could affect their case.

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