Streams

 

Writing

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Judith Thurman on fashion writing.

Monday, May 05, 2014

Judith Thurman on fashion writing.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Seriously Funny

Monday, May 05, 2014

Christopher Buckley, humorist and author But Enough About You: Essays (Simon & Schuster, 2014), makes the case for taking humor writing seriously with his new collection of essays.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

John Updike's Life and Writing

Monday, April 14, 2014

John Updike is one of the most celebrated writers in American literature. Adam Begley talks about his biography of the Updike—a candid, intimate, and richly detailed look at his life and work. Updike explores how Updike’s fiction was shaped by his tumultuous personal life—including his enduring religious faith, his two marriages, and his first-hand experience of the “adulterous society” he was credited with exposing in the bestselling Couples.

Comments [1]

On The Media

News and the Novel

Friday, March 21, 2014

For the past four years novelist David Bezmozgis has been writing a book set in Crimea. His forthcoming novel, The Betrayers, was intended to be set in August 2014, but that isn't possible now. Brooke speaks with Bezmozgis, as he sits between manuscript lock and book release, about trying to adjust his fictional story set in a fraught, factual place. 

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: John Banville AKA Benjamin Black

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Benjamin Black (John Banville) stopped by to talk about his latest novel on March 4, 2014. He let us know what he's been reading lately, and what foods he loves.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Billy Collins, Two-Time Poet Laureate

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Two-term Poet Laureate of the United States, Billy Collins, discusses putting together his first compilation of new and selected poems in 12 years, Aimless Love. He talks about his singular voice, which combines plain speech with imaginative surprise.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

On Writers and Drinking

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Olivia Laing examines the link between creativity and alcohol in the work and lives of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, John Berryman, John Cheever, and Raymond Carver, who were all alcoholics. In The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinking, she takes a journey from Cheever’s New York to Williams’s New Orleans, from Hemingway’s Key West to Carver’s Port Angeles, to piece together a map of alcoholism, a disease that has also affected her own family.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ann Patchett's This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Ann Patchett examines her deepest commitments—to writing, family, friends, dogs, books, and her husband. She creates a portrait of a life in This is the Story of a Happy Marriagethat begins with her childhood, covers disastrous early marriage, a later happy one, and examines her relationships with family and friends and the joy of writing.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco

Monday, December 23, 2013

Poet Richard Blanco talks about delivering the inaugural poem at President Obama’s second inauguration in January 2013. In For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journal, he reveals the inspiration and challenges—including his experiences as a Latino immigrant and gay man—behind the creation of the inaugural poem, "One Today," as well as other poems commissioned for the occasion.

Comment

Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Extremely Creative Writing

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

A writers' model, Alex Karpovsky reads some extremely creative writing by Etgar Keret, Joan Didion tells us how she did it, TC Boyle dates Jane Austen.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

How Facebook is Hurting & Helping Student Writing

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Most of us these days don’t bother with writing letters—instead we send updates on social media, or write to each other in short texts. How are Facebook and Twitter affecting our writing? For younger people who are still learning their language skills along with these technologies, is their writing better or worse for the experience? English teacher Jessica Lahey of New Hampshire believes that writing skills are being eroded by things like Facebook. English teacher Andrew Simmons of California says he sees his student's writing improving from social media.

Comments [20]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Daniel Menaker on Life and The New Yorker

Monday, November 18, 2013

Daniel Menaker discusses beginning his career as a fact checker at The New Yorker in 1969. He was promoted to editor and he stayed at the magazine for another 24 years. InMy Mistake: A Memoir, he portrays life in that wonderfully strange place and beyond. He offers wry, hilarious observations on publishing, child-rearing, parent-losing, and the writing life.

Comment

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Peter Hessler on writing about small towns.

Monday, November 11, 2013

Peter Hessler on writing about small towns.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ivan Klima's Crazy Century

Monday, November 11, 2013

Acclaimed Czech writer Ivan Klima reflects back on his life and on decades of war, totalitarianism, censorship, and the fight for democracy. Klíma’s memoir My Crazy Century begins in the 1930s on the outskirts of Prague. During WWII, most of his family survived the Terezín concentration camp, but when they returned home, their city was falling into the grip of Communism.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ann Patchett's Story of a Happy Marriage

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Ann Patchett examines her deepest commitments—to writing, family, friends, dogs, books, and her husband.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Writers on Loving and Leaving New York

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Hear their own stories of the allure of New York and the grief that comes when the city loses its magic.

Comments [32]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Questions for Peter Carey

Monday, October 21, 2013

What are your favorite books/who are your favorite authors?

     The library is too big for favorites. Recently I have enjoyed Donna Tartt's new novel, John Ralston Saul's Voltaire's Bastards, David Graeber's Debt, Chris Adrian's The Children's Hospital.

 

What authors or works do you think are underappreciated or overlooked?

     The Great Australian writer Helen Garney. Go out and buy The Spare Room now.

 

Do you have any writing rituals or habits? Where, when, and how do you write?

     Clean teeth. Put on shoes. Make coffee. Write with my nose.

 

Do you have favorite or least favorite words? What are they and why?

     MBA words of any sort—incentivise for instance. Ultilitarian, ugly words like "de-glove."

 

Are there certain kinds of characters or stories you’re drawn to in your own work?

     Obsessive people, angry people, anyone with dangerous levels of energy.

 

What's the last great thing you read/saw/listened to?

     Rachel Kusher's The Flame Throwers.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

"Write. Rewrite. Stop." Brian's Advice to Writers

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

I recently got a chance to speak at the presentation of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, put on by the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. Here are my remarks, with advice for writers young and old.

I was asked to choose some words of advice to give to young writers. I have three words: write, rewrite and stop.

If you want to make it at something, do it all the time. If you love to write and want to be a writer, write along with your life. Write about the mundane things that happen in your day and you'll wind up finding meaning in them that you didn't know was there until the writing made you start to think. I sometimes tell people I think with my fingers, meaning give me a keyboard, any keyboard, when I want to really think something through. So write along with your life. Then write about things outside your life.

Read More

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

David Plante on Becoming a Londoner

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

David Plante discusses his memoir, Becoming a Londoner: A Diary. This first volume spans his first 20 years in London, beginning in the mid-1960s, and pieces together an intimate portrait of a relationship and a luminous world of writers, poets, artists, and thinkers.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

John O'Hara's BUtterfield 8 and New York Stories

Thursday, September 12, 2013

John O’Hara is the most-published short story writer in the history of The New Yorker, and he’s seen as an American master of realism. Two new editions of his work have been published—The New York Stories, collected for the first time, and his popular novel BUtterfield 8. Steven Goldleaf, professor of English literature at Pace University and the author of John O’Hara: A Study of Short Fiction, and Lorin Stein, editor of the Paris Review, John O’Hara’s work and style.

Comments [2]