Streams

 

Writers

The Brian Lehrer Show

Books That Changed My Mind: New York City

Thursday, December 11, 2014

In our ongoing series on "Books That Changed My Mind," writers Sari Botton and Alexander Chee debate leaving New York City.

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Schoolbook

Teenage Authors Get Dark and Twisted for Novel Writing Month

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

November was National Novel Writing Month. At a Manhattan middle school, students who took part in a writing challenge focused on some pretty twisted stuff.
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The Leonard Lopate Show

Penelope Fitzgerald Began Her Esteemed Writing Career at Sixty

Monday, November 17, 2014

Then promptly won a Booker Prize. A new biography covers the life of the Oxford-educated "blond bombshell" who struggled for years as an impoverished mother before finding literary fame.

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Selected Shorts

Creative Writing

Friday, October 24, 2014

A husband and wife write duelling fictions.

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Selected Shorts

I Dated Jane Austen

Friday, October 24, 2014

The title says it all in TC Boyle's absurd fantasy, "I Dated Jane Austen."

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Selected Shorts

On Keeping a Notebook

Friday, October 24, 2014

Joan Didion's trade secrets.

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Selected Shorts

The Writers Model

Friday, October 24, 2014

Molly Giles' wicked story about male novelists in search of inspiration.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Writers on the Art of Writing

Friday, October 24, 2014

Molly Giles, Etgar Keret, Joan Didion and TC Boyle on the art of writing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Do You Have to Be Crazy to Be a Genius?

Monday, July 21, 2014

Neuroscientist and literary scholar Nancy C. Andreasen tries to answer the question: If high IQ does not indicate creative genius, then where does the trait come from, and why is it so often accompanied by mental illness? Andreasen has studied the neuroscience of mental illness and has worked with many gifted subjects, including Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, and John Cheever, from the Iowa Writers' Workshop to investigate the science of genius. She’s currently working with artists and scientists including George Lucas, the mathematician William Thurston, the novelist Jane Smiley, and six Nobel laureates. Her article “Secrets of the Creative Brain” is the cover story of the July/August issue of The Atlantic

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Selected Shorts

Lydia Millet speaks with Hannah Tinti

Friday, July 04, 2014

SELECTED SHORTS’ literary commentator Hannah Tinti talks to Lydia Millet about “Sir Henry” and short fiction.

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Selected Shorts

What Animal Are You?

Friday, April 25, 2014

This reading by Willem Dafoe of Etgar Keret’s “What Animal Are You?” is part of the SELECTED SHORTS program “Wish Fulfillment,” hosted by Parker Posey.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Extremely Creative Writing

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

A writers' model, Alex Karpovsky reads some extremely creative writing by Etgar Keret, Joan Didion tells us how she did it, TC Boyle dates Jane Austen.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Daily Rituals

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Mason Currey describes the daily rituals of Andy Warhol, John Updike, Twyla Tharp, Benjamin Franklin, William Faulkner, Jane Austen, and other other great minds. In Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, he describes the routines that enable novelists, poets, playwrights, painters, philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians to do the work they love to do.

Do you have daily rituals that help you get your work done? Share them—leave a comment below!

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: D. T. Max

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

New Yorker writer D. T. Max stopped by to talk about his biography of the author David Foster Wallace, Every Love Story is a Ghost Story. He shared his guest picks with us.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Lives of Margaret Fuller

Thursday, January 17, 2013

John Matteson talks about the writer and a fiery social critic, Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), who was perhaps the most famous American woman of her generation. She was the leading female figure in the transcendentalist movement, wrote a celebrated column of literary and social commentary, served as the first foreign correspondent for an American newspaper, and she authored the first great work of American feminism: Woman in the Nineteenth Century. Matteson tells her story and examines her legacy in his biography of her, The Lives of Margaret Fuller.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Inspiration Strikes After Tragedy: Alfred Kazin on His New Yorker Trilogy

Friday, November 02, 2012

WNYC

Starting Out in the Thirties (1965), the second installment of Kazin's New Yorker Trilogy, had just been published when he gave this brief talk on the genesis of his artistic motivation at a 1965 Books and Authors Luncheon.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: An Irish Ear: Colum McCann’s Favorite Stories

Sunday, August 19, 2012

Ultimate acts in stories selected by Colum McCann, and a sharp-edged fantasy by Molly Giles).

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

A Paradigm Shift For the Beat Generation

Friday, August 10, 2012

WNYC

Jack Kerouac famously suggested the Beat Generation is "a swinging group…of new American men intent on joy." Scholars and writers join Kerouac in this 1959 discussion at the Brandeis University Club of New York for a rollicking, witty debate.

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The Takeaway

Reflections on the Life and Legacy of Adrienne Rich

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Adrienne Rich, a poet and essayist who profoundly influenced a generation of modern American writers, died yesterday at the age of 82. Rich was known as the poet of the women’s movement. Her most renowned collection, "Diving into the Wreck," was published in the midst of the feminist revolution in 1971. With us is Jan Clausen, poet and professor at Goddard College, who was profoundly influenced by Adrienne Rich.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: The World of Etgar Keret

Sunday, October 02, 2011

The new season of SELECTED SHORTS begins with a program devoted to the darkly humorous Israeli writer Etgar Keret, whose playful but subversive stories, in which harsh reality often topples into fantasy, have earned him an international following.  His story collections include The Bus Driver Who Wanted to be God, The Girl on the Fridge, and The Nimrod Flipout.

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