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World War Ii

The Takeaway

Remembering Pearl Harbor

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

December 7, 1941 was a grim rude awakening for the United States. America was part of a world dissolving into global industrial scale bloodshed. The attack on Pearl Harbor exposed the vulnerability and disarray of the U.S. Military in 1941. But it also motivated a resolve that America had never before experienced — a unity that redefined a nation still simmerring with divisions left over from the Civil War days. America's entry into the Great War of 1914-1919 was an acknowledgement of its arrival as a world power, no longer anyone's former colony. The nation's entry into World War II was a righteous cause to redress a wound everyone in the country felt.

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The Takeaway

Tweeting World War II in Real Time, 72 Years Later

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Since August 31, the anniversary of Germany's invasion into Poland, Alwyn Collinson has been tweeting the events of World War II as if they were in real time, 72 years later. Under the handle @RealTimeWWII, Collinson sends up to 40 tweets a day chronicling the war, using eyewitness accounts, photographs and video. His Twitter page now has more than 118,000 followers and his tweets are translated into Spanish, Portuguese and Russian. Collinson talks about how he embarked on the six-year project.

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The Takeaway

Nazi Rudolf Hess Exhumed From Grave

Thursday, July 21, 2011

The corpse of Adolf Hitler's one-time top deputy Rudolf Hess was exhumed and his grave destroyed, according to authorities in Germany. Hess's tombstone, which read "I dared" in German, had become a shrine for neo-Nazis according to the Lutheran church in Wunsiedel, where he was buried. Hess was burried in Wunsiedel according to his wishes after committing suicide in prison at age 93 in 1987. His remains will be cremated and scattered at sea.

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The Takeaway

Was Justice Served in Nazi Prison Guard Trial?

Friday, May 13, 2011

Former Nazi death camp guard John Demjanjuk was found guilty of nearly 30,000 counts of accessory to murder in a German prison. At age 91, Demjanjuk was sentenced to five years in prison, but will be released pending a possible appeal. Demjanjuk is accused of being a prison guard at the Sobibor camp in Nazi occupied Poland in 1943. Does he deserve an appeal? David Cesarani,  professor of history at Royal Holloway, University of London, joins us for more on the story. 

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The Takeaway

Nazi John Demjanjuk Convicted of Accessory to Murder

Thursday, May 12, 2011

John Demjanjuk has been found guilty of being an accessory to murder as a Nazi concentration camp guard. He was living as a retired autoworker living in Ohio. In 2009, he was deported from the U.S. for a second time and sent to Germany, where he was charged with helping to force nearly 28 thousand Jews to their death at the Sobibor death camp in Poland. Reporter for the BBC, Steve Evans was at the trial.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Following Up: Baby Boom vs. War Boom

Friday, January 07, 2011

Jim Von Schilling, professor of English and humanities at Northampton Community College and the Baby Boomer Area chair for the Popular Culture Association, compares the lives of postwar baby boomers to those of a lesser-known "War Years" boom—the millions who were born during World War II. Plus, how some people misuse the phrase "Kabuki Theater."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Blood-Dark Track: Joseph O’Neill’s Family History

Friday, November 26, 2010

Joseph O’Neill, author of the novel Netherland, tells a personal family history. His grandfathers—one Turkish, one Irish—were both imprisoned during the Second World War. In Blood-Dark Track: A Family History, he traces their stories, set against the history of the last century's most inhuman events.

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The Takeaway

Yankees Aboard British Fleets

Thursday, November 11, 2010

The U.S. involvement in World War II famously began on December 8th, 1941, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. But there were already a small number of Americans personally invested in the war effort. They were volunteers to the British Royal Navy — and had headed to Halifax as early as 1940 to join the war effort.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Blood-Dark Track

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

Joseph O’Neill, author of the novel Netherland, tells a personal family history. His grandfathers—one Turkish, one Irish—were both imprisoned during the Second World War. In Blood-Dark Track: A Family History, he traces their stories, set against the history of the last century's most inhuman events.

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WQXR News

New Footage of "The Blitz" Unveiled

Monday, September 06, 2010

Rare color footage of the bomb damage inflicted on London during World War II has surfaced on the eve of the 70th anniversary of the Blitz.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Film Unfinished

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Filmmaker Yael Hersonski, discusses “A Film Unfinished:” her acclaimed documentary about the atrocities in The Warsaw Ghetto during World War II. The footage, shot by the Nazis in May 1942, became a resource for historians. However, the later discovery of a long-missing reel that included multiple takes with staged scenes, complicated earlier readings of the footage. “A Film Unfinished” presents the raw footage in its entirety, carefully noting fictionalized sequences, and explores the making of an infamous Nazi propaganda film. The film opens in New York August 18 at Film Forum and at Lincoln Plaza Cinema.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Sam Bryan on "Siege"

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Sam Bryan talks about the film “Siege,” made by his father, American photojournalist Julien Bryan, during the Siege of Warsaw in September 1939. Bryan was the only neutral reporter left in the city after the German invasion of Poland that started World War II, and he shot footage of the massive destruction of Warsaw and its people. “Siege” has just been released on DVD. It's available at amazon.com and at barnesandnoble.com.

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WNYC News

Today in History: Japanese Surrender

Wednesday, September 02, 2009

japansurrenderOn September 2, 1945, Japanese officials signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender aboard the USS Missouri. Here General MacArthur speaks at the signing ceremony.

“We are gathered here representatives of the major warring powers to conclude a solemn agreement whereby peace may be restored. The issues involving divergent ideals and ideologies have been determined on the battlefields of the world and hence are not for our discussion or debate...It is my earnest hope and indeed the hope of all mankind that from this solemn occasion a better world shall emerge out of the blood and carnage of the past, a world dedicated to the dignity of man, and the fulfillment of his most cherished wish for freedom, tolerance, and justice....

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WNYC News

Today in History: World War II Begins

Tuesday, September 01, 2009

germaninvasion1939On September 1, 1939, World War II begins as Nazi Germany invades Poland.

French news account of events in English, which aired August 31:


German news account of events in English:

Adolph Hitler's ...

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Studio 360

Philip Roth

Saturday, November 06, 2004

In Philip Roth’s latest novel The Plot Against America, Roth imagines what would have happened if the aviation hero Charles Lindberg had defeated Franklin Roosevelt in the 1940 election. In the book, an 8-year old boy named Philip Roth watches as the U.S. sits out of World War II ...

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Studio 360

Exiled in Hollywood

Saturday, June 28, 2003

In the 1930s and '40s, Hollywood became a major destination for European composers fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe, and they made Tinseltown an important musical center, not just for film scores, but for contemporary classical music. Produced by Jeff Lunden.

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Studio 360

The Post War Moment

Saturday, March 01, 2003

What happened after World War II that made artists want to improvise? Produced by John Strausbaugh.

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Studio 360

Zoot Suit Riots

Saturday, August 11, 2001

In southern California during World War II, the extravagantly-tailored suits of young Mexican-Americans, with broad shoulders, huge lapels, narrow peg pants and wingtip shoes, clashed with the all-American austerity of the war. KCRW's Eric Roy takes a look back at 1940s Los Angeles and the improbable flash point that became ...

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Studio 360

Chiura Obata

Saturday, August 11, 2001

In the spring of 1942, Chiura Obata, an art professor at the University of California at Berkeley, and his family were among the thousands of Japanese Americans relocated to internment camps. Obata's granddaughter, Kimi Kodani Hill, and Timothy Burgard, a curator at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, tell the ...

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Studio 360

Commentary: War Memorials

Saturday, November 11, 2000

Veterans Day, November 11th, prompts Kurt’s commentary on America’s war memorials. 

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