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World Literature

To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Codex Seraphinianus

Sunday, April 19, 2015

This book really got us excited. 12 x 36. 10 pounds. Everyone wanted to touch it. Borrow it. Talk about it. It felt like magic. And the title was just as mysterious – Codex Seraphinianus. Publisher Charles Mier tell us what the hell it is (and what is isn't). Want to see the first 74 pages of the "world's weirdest book"?

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

BookMark: "Independent People" by Halldór Laxness

Sunday, March 01, 2015

 "Independent People" by Halldór Laxness reviewed by author David Mitchell ("Cloud Atlas")

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

A Poet's Glossary

Sunday, February 22, 2015

The celebrated poet Edward Hirsch says the history of poetry is the history of poetic forms. And to prove it he wrote a 700-page compendium about all things poetry.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Somali-American Fantasy

Sunday, February 01, 2015

A fantasy novel written by a Somali-American Mennonite raised in the US who wrote it while teaching English during a civil war in what is now South Sudan and then revised it in Egypt.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Nigerian Science Fiction

Sunday, February 01, 2015

No discussion of genre fiction would be complete without science fiction. And an alien invasion. That’s the premise of “Lagoon" set in Lagos, Nigeria.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

New African Literature

Sunday, February 01, 2015

 It’s time for you to meet the next wave of African fiction and our guest has compiled their writing together in the book “Africa39” – an anthology of 39 African writers under the age of 39

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

BookMark: Alfred Kubin's "The Other Side"

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Jeff VanderMeer recommends "The Other Side" by Alfred Kubin.

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Talk to Me

Working Words: Writers Try to Fix It at the PEN World Voices Festival

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Is the pen mightier than the sword, or any number of other challenges? That’s what “A Working Day,” at the PEN World Voices Festival set out to explore on April 28.

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