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Workforce

WNYC News

The Changing Faces Around the Water Cooler

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

A report from New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer shows the office workforce in Manhattan is now less white, less black, and less female, than it was in 1990.

Stringer’s analysis, comparing 1990 and 2012, shows that women workers comprise a slightly smaller percent of the total workforce (48.2 percent ...

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New Tech City

A Juice Cleanse for Your Brain: 5 Steps to Relevance in Today’s Workforce

Thursday, October 31, 2013

We used to classify ourselves as either artsy or analytical. Not only has the myth of left or right-brain dominance been debunked, limiting yourself to one or the other won't further a career these days.

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New Tech City

New Tech City: Finding a Job in the Digital Era

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

In response to New York City's 9.1 percent unemployment rate, many New Yorkers are exploring new tech-based strategies to find jobs on their tablets, smartphones and even "dumb" phones.  

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The Takeaway

Performance Reviews Might Just Be the Problem

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

It's the time of year when companies around the nation ask employees and employers to have what's usually an awkward conversation: the 'performance review.' We'll be hearing from a management professor who thinks we should simply do away with them entirely. Do you have to do one? Do you have to conduct one?  Are they helpful, or is there a better way to get the information across?

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The Takeaway

Toolbelts and Hard Hats: The Road to Female Financial Freedom?

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

The American workforce is still surprisingly segregated by gender, and this separation does not seem to benefit women. Two-thirds of working women are concentrated in only five percent of occupational categories. And in the few fields where more than 90 percent of workers are women – like childcare and food preparation – the pay tends to be low. Compare this low pay to male-dominated industries (there are a lot of them). Almost one in four job categories, such as construction work and trucking consist of workforces that are almost exclusively male. And those same jobs pay up to 30 percent more than traditionally female jobs like secretarial work.

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The Takeaway

Does the Summer Job Exist Anymore?

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

For this week’s work segment, we look at a coming-of-age ritual that teenagers have engaged in for decades, but might be missing out on this year due to the bad economy: the summer job. A new study indicates that the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds has doubled in the past three years, from 10 percent to 20 percent, making the search for the summer job harder than ever.

But it’s not entirely hopeless.

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The Takeaway

The Risks and Payoffs of Dangerous Jobs

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

The recent accidents in a West Virginia mine and a Gulf of Mexico oil rig have a lot of us focusing on dangerous jobs, and asking: what makes some careers so dangerous? And what drives some workers to risk their lives for their work?

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The Takeaway

How To Land On Your Feet When You're Falling Down The Corporate Ladder

Tuesday, April 06, 2010

As the recession rages on, many experienced workers who’ve lost their jobs are looking at job listings and wondering: Am I overqualified for this? And if I apply anyway, how can I convince myself (or someone else) that I'm right for the job?

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The Takeaway

The Working Mother Dash

Tuesday, March 09, 2010

First, the warm up: A light jog amid office cubicles to the elevator bank. Filled with liquid gold – the day’s breast milk receipts – my six-pound Pump & Go vigilantly straddles my shoulder as I make my way, gingerly dodging the judgmental eyes and last-minute questions from colleagues. I pound the call button once, then twice more for good measure, then rifle through my purse, desperately groping for the commuter ticket that will take me home to the achingly sweet babies I left at home 10 hours earlier.

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The Takeaway

Turning a Seasonal Job Into a Full Time Gig

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

During the holidays it’s not unusual for people to take on a holiday job, at a retailer or a mail-order company, to make ends meet and to help put Christmas gifts under the tree. But in this competitive job market, you might want to also consider that short term job a way to get your foot in the door for the long term. Beth Kobliner, author of "Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance In Your Twenties and Thirties," discusses this with Kurt Kuehn, Chief Financial Officer at UPS. Kuehn started with UPS as a seasonal driver's assistant 32 years ago.

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The Takeaway

Temp Workers Find More Jobs In November

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

Temporary and contract workers may be the first to start feeling some relief as the recession ebbs. Temporary staffing companies found jobs for more than 52,000 workers in November, the most since 2004, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this week. For a deeper look at the freelance market, we speak with Sara Horowitz, founder and executive director of Freelancers Union. We also speak with University of Chicago Professor Susan Lambert.

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The Takeaway

Retraining: Learning New Tricks in a Down Economy

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Some 5.6 million American manufacturing jobs have been lost since 1999, and many of those jobs don't appear to be coming back anytime soon. At least some of the people who worked in manufacturing are trying to learn new job skills: We look at the successes and failures of retraining programs with Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner. We're also joined by Hal Higdon, president of Ozarks Technical Community College in Springfield, Mo., who says community colleges are too overburdened to be effective; and Robin Ambrosy, laid off in January of 2006 from her job with Sony and now retraining to become an occupational therapist.

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The Takeaway

Investing in Yourself: The Job Club

Friday, October 16, 2009

Almost 6 million people are currently unemployed in the United States. Trying to get a job in a volatile job market is proving so difficult that some job searchers are turning to professional help. The Takeaway's Femi Oke joined a networking club to meet job hunters who’ve decided they need to spend some money to land their next job.

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The Takeaway

Technology: Where Staff Diversity Makes Business Sense

Thursday, October 15, 2009

This morning we're discussing technology companies who have made diversity a priority. When Larry Page and Sergey Brin set up Google, they made diverse hiring a goal. It wasn’t for the sake of being politically correct — they thought it would be good for business. We speak to Marissa Mayer, vice president of search product and user experience at Google (and one of Google’s first employees); along with Xerox’s chief diversity and employee advocacy officer, Philip Harlow. We also look at how minorities lag behind at research universities with Donna Nelson, a chemistry professor at the University of Oklahoma, who authored a report: "A National Analysis in Science and Engineering Faculties at Research Universities (opens a PDF)."

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The Takeaway

Immigrants Axed by American Apparel

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

A Los Angeles–based clothing company is laying off 1,800 immigrant employees in the coming weeks at the behest of the Obama administration. And it's not just any company — it's American Apparel, a business that has made a name for itself for paying its workers a better-than-fair wage and offering in-factory massages. (And, yes, they have also made a name for themselves with their over-the-top "sex sells" advertising.) Are the layoffs at American Apparel the start of a larger storm to come, in which more companies will be asked to let immigrants go? New York Times immigration reporter Julia Preston gives us the details.

For more, read Julia Preston's article, Immigration Crackdown With Firings, Not Raids, in today's New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Workplace Gender Balance Shifting

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, we're soon likely to see a major shift in the gender balance of the working world. As early as this November, it's projected that for the first time in U.S. history, more women will be working than men. Add to this fact that 78 percent of the people laid off in the recent recession were men, and one sees a whole new picture of America's workforce.

We speak with Beth Kobliner, author of "Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties." She says the forces changing the demographics of the working world influence both men and women. Also, Sharon Meers, a former Goldman Sachs executive and co-author of "Getting to 50/50: How Working Couples Can Have It All by Sharing It All," explains what the shifts might mean for the managers and workers of small and large companies across the country.

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The Takeaway

Will Move For Work

Thursday, September 17, 2009

As the unemployment rate climbs, more people are having to relocate in order to find work. Almost 20% of Americans who took new jobs in July moved in order to get them. The Takeaway's finance contributor Beth Kobliner talks about the challenges — and opportunities — of a national job search. We also hear from Jeff Gilbert, who moved last year from outside Detroit to Wyoming, Ohio to take a job as general manager of a commercial manufacturing company.

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The Takeaway

Productivity on the Rise

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

The U.S. Labor Department just released productivity numbers for the spring quarter and they are on the rise—productivity is the highest in six years. We talk to Kelly Evans, economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

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The Takeaway

Economy Hits Older Workers Hard

Monday, August 10, 2009

14.5 million Americans are out of work due to the worst recession since the Great Depression. All age groups are feeling the pain of the recession, but for 44-55 year olds, it's even harder. Beth Kobliner, Takeaway work-life Contributor and author of the bestseller, "Get a Financial Life" talks to us, along with Susan Price, who is 49, unemployed and looking for work.

I tried to remove some of the age indicators from my resume...I definitely updated my resume to reflect the newness of the MBA and tried to play down some of the other dates.
—Susan Price, 49 year old laid-off professional trying to find a job

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The Takeaway

Does High Unemployment Mean the Death of Macho?

Thursday, July 02, 2009

This morning the unemployment numbers come out and there is a strong chance that they could reach the double digits. The economy is hitting men particularly hard. From the corporate suites to the construction sites, since November, more than 80 percent of job losses in the U.S. have fallen on men. For a look at what this means for both men and women in the workforce, we are joined by Kelly Evans, she is the economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal. We are also joined by Riehan Salam, a fellow at The New America Foundation; he’s written a new piece on this for Foreign Policy magazine titled The Death of Macho. And for an up close look on how the recession is affecting men we turn to Michael Doyle. Doyle is the Vice President and General Manager of the Southeast Division of Manpower, which is an employment service provider.

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