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Womens Rights

The Takeaway

An 'All Boys Club' in Iowa?

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

The rise and fall of Michele Bachmann in Iowa has brought to light an uncomfortable truth about Iowa politics. The state, which holds the first caucus in the nation, has never elected a female to the U.S. Senate, Congress, or the governorship

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The Takeaway

Mississippi's Proposition 26 Radically Alters Abortion Laws

Friday, October 28, 2011

On November 8, Mississippi voters will be making a decision which will have deep and lasting national implications for women’s contraceptive rights. If passed, Proposition 26, also known as "The Personhood Amendment," would say that life begins at the moment that a human egg is fertilized. This would give an egg, no matter the age, all of the human and legal rights afforded to a citizen.

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The Takeaway

After Criticism, FBI May Change Federal Definition of Rape

Friday, October 21, 2011

Last year, according to The New York Times, the city of Chicago recorded nearly 1,400 rapes. But none of these appeared in the FBI's annual federal crime report. That’s because the FBI doesn’t accept Chicago’s definition of what constitutes "rape." And it’s not just Chicago. The annual figures from cities and municipalities across the country are understated every year in the FBI's yearly Uniform Crime Report due to how the Bureau defines the crime.

Last year, according to our partner the New York Times, the city of Chicago recorded nearly 1,400 rapes. But none of these appeared in the FBI’s annual federal crime report. That’s because the F-B-I doesn’t accept Chicago’s definition of what constitutes “rape.” 
And it’s not just Chicago. The annual figures from cities and municipalities across the country are understated every year in the F-B-I’s yearly Uniform Crime Report due to how the Bureau defines the crime. It's a definition that was written more than 80 years ago.
But after years of criticism from women's rights advocates.. the F-B-I is proposing a revision to the federal definition of rape. The change would lead to a significant increase in the number of sexual assault crimes reported to the FBI by law enforcement agencies across the country. 
Joining us now to talk about all of this is Carol Tracy. She’s the Executive director of the Women’s Law Project in Philadelphia and she’s been leading the effort for a new, broader federal definition of rape for years.

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The Takeaway

Three Women Awarded Nobel Peace Prize

Friday, October 07, 2011

Three women were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, becoming the first women to win since 2004. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, also of Liberia, and Tawakul Karman of Yemen will share the award. The Norwegian Nobel committee honored the three women for "their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work." Johnson Sirleaf is the first democratically-elected female head of state in Africa, Gbowee is an activist, and Karman is a leading figure in Yemen's pro-democracy movement.

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The Takeaway

Taliban Stones Young Couple to Death in Afghanistan

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

For the first time in nearly a decade of war in Afghanistan, the Taliban has executed a young couple by stoning for having a relationship out of wedlock.

Carried out on Sunday by townspeople and even family members of the couple who tricked them into returning after trying to elope, the execution was the latest in a string of harsh punishments by the former regime, which include lashing and amputation. Already some in the country are calling the execution appropriate. Just a week ago a group of 350 religious scholars meeting with government officials called for more punishment under Sharia law.

Are we seeing a resurgence of the Taliban’s extreme punishment, in a long and painful war that was meant to eradicate it? What does the recent violence say about our efforts, and about the Taliban in Afghanistan?

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The Takeaway

Inside Kabul's First Prison for Women

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Western countries celebrated the liberation of women in Afghanistan from the Taliban-controlled government when the U.S. invaded in 2001. However, as the war in the country continues in the post-Taliban era, women's rights are not secure. Badam Bagh, Kabul's only prison for women is filled with stories about the violation of women's rights.

In one instance, a 16-year-old girl was sentenced to 18 months in prison after a boy came to her home to propose without sending his parents first; another was arrested when her husband accused her of adultery. The women's prison is an improvement of sorts, before it existed, female prisoners were incarcerated alongside men, and there were reports of rape. But even at Badam Bagh, "The Almond Garden," it becomes clear that Afghan women are still struggling without rights.

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