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Women'S Rights

The Brian Lehrer Show

Gender Violence in India

Monday, January 07, 2013

Elora Halim Chowdhury, associate professor of women's studies at University of Massachusetts-Boston and author of Transnationalism Reversed: Women Organizing against Gendered Violence in Bangladesh, provides a cultural context for the recent sexual assault in New Delhi and subsequent protests.

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The Empire

Senate Democrats Push Republicans on Women's Issues

Friday, May 04, 2012

In a letter signed by female Democratic state senators to the senate's Republican majority leader, Dean Skelos, Senate Democrats accuse their Republican colleagues of waging the "war on women" here in New York.

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The Takeaway

TED Talks: Nobel-Laureate Leymah Gbowee on Peace in Liberia, and the World

Thursday, March 01, 2012

Leymah Gbowee, a speaker at TED2012, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 for her pivotal role with Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace, the women's peace movement that, in 2003, helped end the four-year-long Second Liberian Civil War. She shared the award with Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the first female president of Liberia. In the wake of the controversy around Sirleaf's reelection, Gbowee was asked by the president to start a "national peace and reconciliation initiative" to address the growing political and ideological tensions within the country.

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The Takeaway

A Pioneer in Women's Running on the 50th Anniversary of Her First Big Race

Thursday, November 24, 2011

This morning, some 15,000 runners are warming up ahead of the Manchester Road Race, a 4.75 mile circuit in New London, Connecticut. One runner is wearing the same blue tunic she wore 50 years ago, when she defied a ban on female participation in long distance running, and set a precedent that changed the face of the sport.

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The Takeaway

Saudi Women Demand Their Right to Drive

Friday, June 17, 2011

In 1990, a group of women in Saudi Arabia did something almost completely unheard of. They got behind the wheels of their cars and they drove. Afterward, they were severely punished, and both the women and the movement fell quiet. However, last month, a single mother named Manal Al-Shafif picked up the torch. Angry and frustrated, she uploaded footage of herself driving. As with the women before her, she was severely punished. This time, however, the movement did not fall quiet.

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The Takeaway

Woman Among Warlords: Afghan Activist Malalai Joya

Friday, April 15, 2011

In 2005, at the age of 27, Malalai Joya became the youngest person ever elected to Afghanistan's National Assembly. In 2007, she was booted from the Parliament after publicly criticizing Afghan warlords. Now, Joya is an activist for women and democracy, and she remains a fierce critic of both Hamid Karzai's government and the presence of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan. Joya shares her story and explains why she has been called "the bravest woman in Afghanistan." 

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The Takeaway

Starting Egypt's Feminist Movement

Friday, March 11, 2011

As the Middle East convulses with more unrest this Friday we want revisit Egypt’s push for democracy and the role that women are playing in the movement there.  It was only three days ago on International Women’s Day that women protesting for equal rights in Egypt’s Tahrir square were attacked and sexually harassed.  What steps should they be taking next in the pro-democracy movement?

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The Takeaway

On 100th Women's Day, a Look at the Changing Middle East

Tuesday, March 08, 2011

Today is the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day. Recently, women in the Middle East and North Africa, have been standing up and pushing for democratic change and equal rights. What lies ahead for women in these countries as they grapple with forming new, more democratic, governments?

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It's A Free Country ®

The Budgetary War on Women

Thursday, March 03, 2011

WNYC
When women feel unable to carry a pregnancy to term, they do seek termination services, even when those services are illegal, difficult to find or dangerous. So not only would we expect a rise in abortions, we might also expect a rise in negative outcomes for women’s health.

Melissa Harris-Perry, columnist at The Nation magazine and associate professor of politics and African-American studies at Princeton University on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Women in Democracy Building in the Middle East

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Karima Bennoune, professor at Rutgers School of Law and a specialist on the democracy movement, women's rights and religious extremism in the Middle East, and Egyptian-born Leila Ahmed (author of the forthcoming book A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, from the Middle East to America), professor at Harvard Divinity School whose work focuses on women and religion in the Middle East, discuss the role of religion and women in reform in the Middle East.

Read A Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

It's A Free Blog

The Bias that Won't Go Away

Monday, November 01, 2010

WNYC

The 2010 elections have demonstrated that sexism is alive and well in politics. Yesterday Carl Paladino shamelessly referred to Senator Kirsten Gillibrand as Chuck Schumer's little girl. Twice.

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The Takeaway

Banning Hair Dos, Iran Cracks Down on Western Influence

Thursday, July 08, 2010

In Tehran, a private organization has introduced a catalog of appropriate haircuts for men, the first such code since the Islamic Revolutions of 1979. The list, presented by the Veil and Modesty Festival, has not been officially sanctioned by the Ministry of Culture, though they say approval is "pending."

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The Takeaway

FIrst Take: A Woman's World; Outrage on US-Mexico Border; Futbol Foreign Affairs

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

For the first time in U.S. history, women have become the majority in the workforce. And Tuesday’s primary elections showed us that women can dominate in politics too. In California, Carly Fiorina and Meg Whitman both won their Republican nominations for Senate and governor, respectively. Sen. Blanche Lincoln secured the Democratic ticket in Arkansas. Plus Nikki Haley was victorious in South Carolina. The Washington Post’s website is leading with a headline that suggests this may be the “year of the women.”  Hanna Rosin wrote a piece for The Atlantic titled, "The End of Men." Politics aside, who has it easier in America today – men or women?

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The Takeaway

In Haiti's Tent Cities, Rape A Worsening Problem

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Since Haiti's earthquake earlier this year, thousands of Haitians continue to live in tent cities, which tend to be small, crowded and offer little privacy. As a result, many women have reported being victims of sexual assault or rape. Rape has always been a problem in Haiti, a country where the act was only truly criminalized in 2005, but the breakdown of social structures since the earthquake has worsened the problem.

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The Takeaway

Should Women Be on the Front Lines?

Thursday, February 18, 2010

With the recent announcement that the administration may repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," there has been much talk about issues of equality when it comes to the military. But another another group is also struggling for equal military opportunities: women. The current policy held by the Department of Defense does not allow women in ground units where they might engage in direct combat.

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The Takeaway

Sexual Assault Still Major Problem in Military

Thursday, February 18, 2010

More women serve in America's armed services than in most other nations. Yet 30 percent of female veterans report being sexually assaulted or raped while serving, according to a 2003 survey funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. This month, Congress is hearing testimony from service members who say they were sexually attacked.

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The Takeaway

Is Women's Empowerment the Solution to World Hunger?

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

The United Nations is reporting that the world is hungrier than ever. This year, the number of people going hungry will top 1 billion for the first time – not a milestone anyone wanted to reach. But a new report claims to have the solution: Give women more power. The BBC's Mark Doyle joins us with the story.

For more, download the International Food Policy Research Institute's Global Hunger Index for 2009 (PDF, 2.7 MB)

Check out the interactive world hunger map from the International Food Policy Research Institute to see how countries are faring:

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The Takeaway

Report: Increased Sexual Assault in the Military

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

As we continue our conversation on women serving in war, we turn to a new report, “Women Warriors: Supporting She ‘Who Has Borne the Battle,’” that shows sexual assault in the military was up nine percent last year. But many assaults go unreported, and fewer than 10% of assailants are court-martialed. For a look at the culture of sexual assault in the military, we're joined by the report's author, Erin Mulhall, from Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, and Army Sgt. Cara Hammer, who served in Iraq from 2004 to 2005 and works in veteran services at the IAVA.

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The Takeaway

Empowering Women From Oppression to Opportunity

Monday, August 24, 2009

What are the biggest moral challenges we face today? We're joined by two people who have given a lot of thought to cultural challenges around the world, including poverty, racism, and the systematic oppression of women. Nick Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times, and his wife Sheryl WuDunn a former New York Times correspondent.

They are authors of the new book “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide,” and wrote the article in Sunday’s New York Times Magazine, "The Women's Crusade."

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The Takeaway

Women and Sports: Can the WNBA Survive?

Monday, June 15, 2009

The WNBA (the professional women’s basketball league) just kicked off its new season. The team that won the first WNBA championships, the Houston Comets, folded under financial pressure. The team's that remain are more talent-packed than ever. But they still face a very tough opponent: the economy. The Takeaway is joined by ESPN.com writer Mechelle Voepel to talk about the WBNA's future.

Watch the top 10 WNBA plays in the video below.

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