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WNYC News

NJ Coyote Tests Positive for Rabies

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Sunday's encounter was the second coyote attack in Bergen County this month.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Shocking Truth About Tiger Farms

Friday, April 03, 2015

In China's government-supported tiger farms, big cats are raised and harvested for their body parts -- part of a multi-million dollar trade in tiger bone wine and tiger skin decor.  Meanwhile, wild tiger numbers are at an all-time low.

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The Takeaway

A Passionate Call to Leave Zoos Behind

Monday, March 09, 2015

Zoos have a long history. But Outside Magazine contributor Tim Zimmerman argues that zoos are bad for animals and don't do much good for people, either.

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The Takeaway

Obama's Move to Protect Arctic Wildlife Triggers Fight With GOP

Monday, January 26, 2015

To the dismay and fury of GOP leaders, President Obama urged Congress to protect 12 million acres of Alaskan wildlife, a move that would prevent all future oil and gas development.

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The Takeaway

How the Fight for the Gray Wolf Was Won & Lost

Monday, November 03, 2014

The federal government’s reintroduction of the gray wolf in the 1990s was a success from a wildlife perspective, but a political disaster with lasting impact.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What To Know About Black Bears in New Jersey

Friday, September 26, 2014

On Sunday, a black bear killed a Rutgers student who was hiking in Northern New Jersey. Attacks are rare -- and this is the first fatal attack in the state since 1852.

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PRI's The World

Here's the green success story of the California blue whale

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

A new study of blue whales in the eastern Pacific has found that the population of the behemoths there has bounced back to near pre-whaling levels. But other populations of blues elsewhere are not doing nearly as well.

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PRI's The World

Coral reefs can communicate with fish, and many of them are crying for help

Thursday, August 21, 2014

With corals in trouble around the world, researchers are examining the role of smell in telling fish to come to a healthy reef or stay away. That may help scientists find ways to manipulate the smells to help damaged reefs recover.

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PRI's The World

Shark photographer Michael Muller goes uncaged to capture the best photos

Friday, August 15, 2014

Photographer Michael Muller's love of sharks takes him into the water and outside of the protection of cages to get as close as possible to his animal subjects. He also photographs celebrities — but won't admit which group is scarier to shoot.

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PRI's The World

As the Ebola crisis rages, West African villagers are warned away from fruit bats

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Scientists are warning West African villagers to stop hunting bush meat and to stay away from fruit bats as they circle in a possible animal source for the latest Ebola outbreak. The Ebola virus lives in fruit bats, scientists believe, and is threatening communities who are already facing the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.

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PRI's The World

Be careful the next time you leave the country with your bagpipes

Friday, August 08, 2014

18-year-old Campbell Webster had his bagpipes seized while crossing the US-Canada border, just days before he was due to fly to Scotland for the World Pipe Band Championships. That's because the pipes are made out of ivory, and new rules about the ivory trade are tripping up musicians like him.

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PRI's The World

The key to some big endangered species crime investigations is a small lab in Oregon

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Trying to figure out where that confiscated rhino horn came from? Is that guitar made from a piece of endangered tropical hardwood? You might find the answers to your questions at the US Fish & Wildlife Service's Forensic Lab in Ashland, Oregon, the only one like it in the world.

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PRI's The World

New lawn 'mooers' keep the grass trimmed in East London's parks

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

The town council in Havering, England, has turned to cows instead of lawnmowers to keep parks and other green spaces neat and trim. Locals say traditional grazing promotes biodiversity and could save half a million dollars over 10 years.

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Radiolab

For the Birds

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Today, a lady with a bird in her backyard upends our whole sense of what we may have to give up to keep a wild creature wild.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Fisher and Friends: Wildlife in New York City

Monday, June 30, 2014

A "fisher" has been spotted in the Bronx. It's an animal related to the weasel, and thought to no longer live in this area after over-hunting in the 1600s. Leslie Day, New York City naturalist, environment and life science educator at The Elisabeth Morrow School, adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and the author of Field Guide to the Natural World of New York City (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007) talks about wildlife in NYC, including what it means that the fisher is back.

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Transportation Nation

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year: MTA Bands Peregrine Falcon Chicks

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Springtime is hatchling time, and in keeping with a 31-year effort, New York's MTA banded the peregrine falcon chicks that nest atop three of its bridges.

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Radiolab

Can It Be? Pigeons, Geese And White-Tailed Deer Were Once Rare

Monday, February 03, 2014

Passenger pigeons went. Dodos went. Buffalo nearly went. But here's the surprise. Three of the weediest, everywhere-ist animals we know (the common pigeon, the white-tailed deer and Canada geese) — they almost went too! Everything, it turns out, is fragile.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What's Happening to the Moose?

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Michelle Carstensen, wildlife health program Supervisor at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and Kristine Rines, a certified wildlife biologist and moose project leader at the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, and talk about why moose are disappearing and the challenges of studying why it’s happening.

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Radiolab

How To Build Little Doors Inside Your Shell: The Secrets of Snail Carpentry

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Snails getting ready for winter are natural carpenters. They construct doors, or maybe you'd call them walls, inside their shells. They do this without hammers, nails or cement. Instead, they use their foot — and of course, their favorite material, mucus. Welcome to the ingenious world of snail construction.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Cicadas Are Coming!

Monday, April 01, 2013

The last time Cicadas appeared in NYC, the Brian Lehrer Show was called "On the Line," there was no such thing as an "embedabble map," and WNYC's Data News team didn't exist. Luckily that's all changed. John Keefe of WNYC Data News discusses their latest project: Cicada Tracker. WNYC is asking citizen scientists around the region to build a detector that reports back soil temperatures. When we begin to see consistent readings of 64° we'll know the cicadas or on their way!

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