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Clinton Condemns WikiLeaks Release

Monday, November 29, 2010

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is condemning the release of millions of documents by the group WikiLeaks. According to The Associated Press, WikiLeaks has begun posting documents online, and ultimately plans to release more than 250,000 documents.

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The Takeaway

Morning Wrap: Is Julian Assange a Hero?

Monday, November 29, 2010

Which is it?

“Julian is a hero!” (Greg on Facebook)

Or

"I think in cases of national security like this they should find a way to screw up his servers and kill his website ... then the man should be prosecuted." (Tyra)
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The Takeaway

Behind-The-Scenes Diplomacy Revealed in Latest WikiLeaks Release

Monday, November 29, 2010

WikiLeaks struck again this weekend, this time releasing a trove of over 250,000 documents containing cable messages between international diplomats. The New York Times and four other major international newspapers received the documents from WikiLeaks early, and agreed to publish their reports today. The confidential messages are plentiful and far-reaching, and reveal the tangled workings of diplomats behind the scenes as they relay messages about a potentially-nuclear Iran, contingency plans for North Korea and various coordinated efforts in the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Wikileaks and The Guardian: Freedom of the Press or Reckless Information Release?

Monday, November 29, 2010

One of the publications that received the 50,000 classified diplomatic cables from Wikileaks was U.K. newspaper The Guardian. Some have wondered if the publication is playing a part in what they charge is Wikileaks founder Julian Assange's "anti-Americanism." Is the leak a shining example of freedom of the press, or a dangerous and damaging action? 

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, November 29, 2010

NYT's David Sanger discusses the 250,000 leaked diplomatic cables published by Wikileaks and analysed by the New York Times.

WQXR News

Washington Reacts to Wikileaks Documents

Monday, November 29, 2010

Washington is reeling after the release of a quarter of a million classified cables sent to and from the State Department. The Obama administration has been forced into damage control and politicians are criticizing the release of the documents.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Examining trove of diplomatic WikiLeaks, Today's top stories

Monday, November 29, 2010

Taking a look at the latest Wikileaks dump, the United States and others try to assess the whether and how much dammage the release of information will cause. 

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Wikileaks Dump Suggests Strange Allies, Morning Headlines

Monday, November 29, 2010

The latest Wikileaks dump of information includes revelations like diplomatic cables from U.S. embassies around the world in which American diplomats are told to spy on their foreign counterparts. But it also reveals some unlikely allies, like Saudi Arabia and Israel, who appear united against Iran. 

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The Takeaway

Wikileaks 'Intelligence' Gathering: State Department or CIA?

Monday, November 29, 2010

Yesterday's WikiLeaks document release shed light on certain demands on U.S. State Department officals across the world. According to the confidential cables obtained by Wikileaks, State Department personnel have been asked to gather personal information — frequent flier numbers, fax and phone information, and credit card numbers, among others — on foreign officials. Is this an explosive realization, or merely a glimpse at the normal operations in the State Department? 

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The Takeaway

Torture and Abuse Revealed in WikiLeaks Documents

Monday, October 25, 2010

WikiLeaks released 400,000 documents on Friday that reveal cases of torture and abuse of detainees by Iraqi security forces. The reports also increase the number of civilian casualites in the war. WikiLeaks editor-in-chief, Julian Assange is the man at the center of this controversy, as he faces accusations that he has put U.S. troops and Iraqi civilians in danger. Also being heavily criticized is The New York Times, which published the reports.

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The Takeaway

Iraq, Torture and the United Nations

Monday, October 25, 2010

The whistle-blowing site WikiLeaks has released a second set of documents out of Iraq — the “Iraq War Logs.” While the nearly 400,000 field reports detailing events seen and heard by the U.S. military troops on the ground in Iraq offer little information about the inner-workings of American detention facilities, they show that the U.S. military was not only aware of torture carried out by the Iraqi army and police — and perhaps even condoned and facilitated it.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 02, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on the politics of the auto bailout and the fall-out of last week's Wiki-Leaks.

The Takeaway

Taliban Target WikiLeaks Names

Friday, July 30, 2010

The WikiLeaks documents have far reaching consequences in Afghanistan. The Taliban claims that they are going to track down informants named in the WikiLeaks documents, putting many lives at risk. Also, the evidence that Pakistan has worked with the Taliban has emboldened the Afghan government to come out harshly against Pakistan.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Neil Sheehan on Leaks and Wikileaks

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Former New York Times reporter Neil Sheehan—the man Daniel Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon Papers to—discusses Wikileaks' disclosure of the “Afghan War Logs” and how reporters handle sensitive government documents that have been passed their way.

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The Takeaway

WikiLeaks Founder Defends Document Release

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

92,000 cryptic reports that offer an hour-by-hour, and sometimes a minute-by-minute, look at the U.S. Army’s actions in Afghanistan were leaked this Sunday by WikiLeaks, a European news organization devoted to uncovering secrets of all kinds. The documents were shared with The Guardian, The New York Times, and Der Spiegel weeks ago, and made public in those papers, and on the Internet, on Sunday.

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The Takeaway

WikiLeaks Documents Show How Pakistan Aids the Taliban

Monday, July 26, 2010

Secret military documents released by WikiLeaks, and published in The New York Times yesterday, show that Pakistan's intelligence service has been aiding the Taliban in Afghanistan. These documents solidify what many Americans fighting the war, and those homeside have suspected and feared for some time. Peter Galbraith, former United Nations Deputy Special Representative for Afghanistan, looks more closely at the documents.

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The Takeaway

Is Obama Cracking Down on Whistle Blowers? The Pentagon Seeks Wikileaks Founder

Monday, June 14, 2010

The Pentagon is searching for Julian Assange, founder of the website Wikileaks, amidst concerns that the site could publish thousands of international cables from the State Department. The cables are allegedly part of a larger package of material given to Wikileaks by 22-year-old Army Specialist Bradley Manning. In late May police arrested Manning, an intelligence analyst in Iraq, accusing him of downloading confidential material from computers on his base and posting it to WikiLeaks.

We speak with Scott Shane, the National Security reporter for The New York Times. He says that while President Obama's administration was elected on a campaign of government transparency, it is actually following a doctrine of extreme media secrecy. Shane says Obama has, in two years, prosecuted more information-leakers than any other president in history.

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The Takeaway

Ex-Hacker Turns in Army Specialist for Leaking Video to Wikileaks

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

Specialist Bradley Manning was arrested for giving Wikileaks a video showing a military helicopter firing on civilians and killing two Reuters reporters. The specialist had struck up a friendship with an ex-hacker, who eventually turned him in for the leak. According to New York Times reporter, Elisabeth Bumiller interviewed the ex-hacker, who said the soldier was unhappy with the military and its policies  Bumiller details the recent arrest and the relationship between the two men.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Listeners React to WikiLeaks Video, Central Command Responds

Thursday, April 08, 2010

Yesterday, we reported on a widely circulated WikiLeaks video from 2007 showing U.S. troops firing on citizens, reporters and armed Iraqis. The video led to a conversation about what we should see from the war as well as the reliability of the source material. We hear your responses. Takeaway producer, Noel King, looked into the story and got a response from a Central Command spokesperson who pointed us to a photo, that he says shows, “very clearly an AK 47 or what remains of it,” as well as “at least one RPG and a number of rifles.”

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The Takeaway

Follow-Up: Digging Deeper Into the Wikileaks Video

Wednesday, April 07, 2010

Noel King here — following up on a story I produced yesterday about a classified video that was released by the non-profit group Wikileaks showing footage of a 2007 incident in Iraq, in which Americans in an Apache helicopter fired on several Iraqis. Two unarmed employees of the Reuters news agency — as well as ten other men — were killed in that incident.

This morning, we spoke to Josh Ray Person, who served with the Marines from 1999 — 2003 and the BBC’s Baghdad Correspondent Jim Muir, who was gathering Iraqi reaction to the video.

A listener from Miami wrote in to say that we failed to mention a redacted report released by the Pentagon late Monday, which said some of the Iraqis — though not the two Reuters employees — were carrying weapons.

Mauro wrote:

Yesterday on NPR this same topic was discussed and the guest agreed that the journalists were there and that they were considered armed because of the straps on their shoulders, but it was also said that at least one RPG was found on one of the casualties and it is shown (but not highlighted) in the video that another of the victims did have an AK-47. Watchdogs are necessary, but they must also be impartial, this video is showing this situation from a very biased viewpoint, all of the editing and the intro are geared towards showing all involved as innocent victims, which is not the complete truth and we have to be fair if we are going to critique.

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