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Wikileaks

The Takeaway

Businesses Turn on Wikileaks

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

Should a company that sells pornography turn it's back on helping host, or fund, Wikileaks? Where is the moral and legal line for companies that have been involved in the company? We're joined by Lauren Bloom, business ethics consultant, for her take. She says that it seems likely the companies aren't caving to government pressure, but are rather making savvy business decisions. 

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The Takeaway

The Case Against WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

Julian Assange turned himself over to police in London on Tuesday, bringing to a close a period of speculation about how and whether the WikiLeaks founder would wind up in custody. Assange currently faces extradition to Sweden where he is wanted for discussion with the police on alleged sex crimes. His problems may not end at the Swedish border, however.

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The Takeaway

Julian Assange: Pariah to E-Commerce

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

In the run up to the arrest of Julian Assange, large companies, including Amazon, Visa and Paypal, refused to continue doing business with WikiLeaks, saying the site and its staff had violated various terms of service. Being dropped has meant WikiLeaks has had to change its online domain name, source its documents from a different web hosting company, and, accept donations via methods other than credit cards. Was this tightening of the noose business as usual or an unethical over-use of corporate power?

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The Takeaway

Imagining WikiLeaks' Political Drama as Literal Drama

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

The tale of Julian Assange and WikiLeaks that has transpired in recent months, and especially the events of the past couple of weeks, has played out like a dramatic thriller. It now seems somewhat inevitable that someone will eventually portray Assange and WikiLeaks, literally, using political theater. How might a dramatic retelling of these already-dramatic events work out?

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Julian Assange as an Outlaw, Morning Headlines

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

Julian Assange is in custody, and from governments to companies, the world is weighing in on what should be done with him or whether his actions with Wikileaks are treason, terrorism, or heroic. Meanwhile, his camp says Assange isn't the international outlaw so many are claiming. 

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

George Packer on Wikileaks and Julian Assange

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

George Packer, staff writer for The New Yorker, discusses what we've learned about U.S. foreign policy from WikiLeaks and this morning's arrest of Julian Assange.

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The Takeaway

Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange Surrenders in London

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange surrendered to authorities in London this morning, for charges that he sexually assaulted two women in Sweden. Assange denies the allegations, which are separate from other accusations concerning Wikileaks document dumps. A Wikileaks spokesman says the charges won't stop the organization from releasing classified information. We're joined by John Burns, reporter for our partner The New York Times, who is outside the courtroom where Assange will find out if he'll be extradited to Sweden to face the charges. 

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The Empire

Wiki stains on your transcript

Monday, December 06, 2010

A State Department employee warned students not to link to or tweet about the Wiki Leaks because, according to the Columbia Spectator, it "could hurt students’ chances of getting jobs in the federal government."

The School of International and Public Affairs warned students on Friday to avoid tweets, Facebook comments, or other posts about the recently released WikiLeaks documents.

In an email sent out to SIPA students, the Office of Career Services said that an alumnus from the U.S. State Department recommended against posting links to or making comments on social media sites about WikiLeaks, a controversial website that releases government information. The site has received attention most recently due to a leak of a quarter-million confidential American diplomatic cables.

The email from SIPA—forwarded to Spectator and also posted on a blog called The Arabist last Thursday—said that the WikiLeaks documents are still considered classified and that posts about them could hurt students’ chances of getting jobs in the federal government.

Representatives from SIPA and the OCS did not respond to requests for comment this weekend.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiJournalism: TMI?

Monday, December 06, 2010

Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism; vice chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists, and co-author of Blur: How to Know What's True in the Age of Information Overload, talks about how news consumers can discern valuable information from dross in the age of "document dumps" a la WikiLeaks.

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It's A Free Country ®

A Quarter of a Million Cables to Analyze? Where to Begin?

Monday, December 06, 2010

WNYC
"Every journalist has to decide, how do I in publicizing these remarks, contextualize them in such a way that I'm creating knowledge and not just publicity."

Tom Rosenstiel, speaking about Wikileaks on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

How the US Might Prosecute Julian Assange

Monday, December 06, 2010

We’ve learned a lot more about Julian Assange since he began publishing tens of thousands of classified documents on WikiLeaks last Sunday. Some believe he’s a hero. Others call him dangerous. Neither the U.S. nor Britain has charged Assange with anything, to date. But should Assange be prosecuted for releasing classified information? Is our legal system prepared to deal with what’s become one of the most notorious information-heists of the Internet Age?

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The Takeaway

US Banks Nervously Await Next WikiLeak

Friday, December 03, 2010

Back when WikiLeaks wasn’t a household name, editor Julian Assange mentioned to ComputerWorld magazine that he had 5 gigs of information from a Bank of America executive’s hard drive. Then last week, Assange mentioned to Forbes that he has something that may take down “a bank or two,” refusing to specify which ones.


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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks Around the World

Friday, December 03, 2010

Derek Stoffel, national reporter for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, discusses what the WikiLeaks cables have to say about Canada.  Then Scott Horton, contributing editor to Harper's Magazine and blogger for Harpers.org, talks about the leaked cables out of Madrid that reveal efforts by the U.S. State Department to obstruct criminal investigations involving Spain. And Time magazine Washington correspondent Massimo Calabresi talks about Julian Assange, the man behind WikiLeaks.

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It's A Free Country ®

Reflections on Wikileaks, From a Man Who Knows How it Feels to be Outed

Thursday, December 02, 2010

WNYC
As embarrassing as some of these more candid comments may be, it is now pretty clear the extent to which we have been working diplomatically, and have been engaging friends and allies around the world on critical questions ranging from Korea to Iran.

-Joe Wilson, former U.S. Ambassador, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks and the Arab World

Thursday, December 02, 2010

Rami Khouri, director of the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut, talks about the portrayal of Arab leaders in the WikiLeaks cables, and the response overseas.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks: Fair Game?

Thursday, December 02, 2010

Ambassador Joe Wilson discusses diplomacy in the wake of WikiLeaks. Also, he talks about the film "Fair Game" in which he and his wife are portrayed. Valerie Plame Wilson was outed as a CIA operative in 2003 by information leaked from the US State Department.

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The Takeaway

Wikileaks Documents Shed Light on US-Pakistani Relations

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Among the State Department cables leaked on WikiLeaks and analyzed in The New York Times were messages from the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan about the country's nuclear fuel resources. In a cable dating May 27, 2009, Amb. Anne W. Pateron reported her concern over a stockpile of highly enriched uranium, which had been sitting for years near an aging research nuclear reactor in Pakistan. There was enough to build several “dirty bombs” or, in skilled hands, possibly enough for an actual nuclear bomb.

The cables show that underneath public assurances lie deep clashes over strategic goals on issues like Pakistan’s support for the Afghan Taliban and tolerance of Al Qaida.

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The Takeaway

Who is Bradley Manning?

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Bradley Manning is a 23-year-old U.S. Army intelligence analyst from a small town in Oklahoma who has gained notoriety after being arrested on charges of leaking over 250,000 diplomatic cables to wikileaks.

Who is this young man, who is currently held in a Viriginia military base, awaiting trial, and why did he do what he did?

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It's A Free Blog

Wikileaks Is No Watchdog

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

We seek transparency from our government to expose wrongdoing. However, the content in the WikiLeaks so far does not expose any thing done wrong by U.S, officials. The only thing that WikiLeaks has accomplished is to put diplomatic communications at risk.

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The Takeaway

Morning Wrap: Is There Any Expectation of Privacy in the 21st Century?

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

You’re still weighing in on the Wikileaks document dump:

The thing about these leaks is how little important information is here. Embarrassing to us and our allies? Sure. But who doesn't think North Korea acts like a spoiled child? Who isn't aware of how China has little impact on North Korea? If WikiLeaks acts like they're doing investigative journalism, they're wrong.They're just another example of tabloid journalism. (Andy on Facebook)

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