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Wikileaks

The Takeaway

Warning Those Named in WikiLeaks Documents

Friday, January 07, 2011

The State Department is working to warn foreign officials, human rights activists and businesspeople who are named in the diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks. Although there haven't been any reports of harm, the State Department is worried that the documents could put hundreds at risk. Correspondent for The New York Times, Mark Landler reports on this move by the U.S.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

U.S. Diplomats and Boeing

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

Eric Lipton, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the WikiLeaks cables that reveal the U.S. diplomatic role in selling Boeing to the rest of the world.

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The Takeaway

British Judge Allows Julian Assange to Post Bail

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Julian Assange was in court again this morning. The WikiLeaks founder is still fighting extradition to Sweden for alleged sex crimes, but today's appearance had more to do with the conditions of his bail. A British judge in a high court heard an appeal from prosecutors, but ruled against the appeal, allowing Assange to be freed from jail for some $317,000 bail. Other stipulations may also apply; the 39-year-old Australian might have to wear an electronic monitoring device, and give up his passport. But he reportedly does plan on leaving his cell for some nicer digs: a 10-room mansion in Essex.   

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks Africa

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Elizabeth Dickinson, assistant managing editor of Foreign Policy magazine and former Nigeria correspondent for the Economist, talks about what the WikiLeaks cables have revealed about Nigeria and Sudan.

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WQXR News

Authorities Delay Assange's Release

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Julian Assange's release on bail has been delayed to allow Swedish authorities to contest the ruling.

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The Takeaway

Reactions From Down Under to Aussie Julian Assange

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

One of the world's most wanted men is seen as a hero and a villian, depending who you talk to. Many in the United States consider him a traitor, even though he is not a U.S. citizen. So how does Assange's native land feel about him? With help from our partners the BBC, we listen to reactions on the topic of Julian Assange and his controversial WikiLeaks, from his home country of Australia.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Tax Cuts and Lame Duck Business

Monday, December 13, 2010

Many Congressional Democrats are not happy with President Obama's compromise with Republicans on extending tax cuts. House Democrats showed that by voting not to bring up the tax bill last week. Callie Crossley, host of the Callie Crossley Show on WGBH in Boston, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, look at how the Senate plans to vote today on the bill.

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It's A Free Country ®

Slideshow: What To Make Of Wikileaks

Monday, December 13, 2010

Images and notable quotes from a recent symposium on Wikileaks and Internet Freedom, sponsored by the Personal Democracy Forum in New York City.

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The Takeaway

More WikiLeaks Cables: Somali Pirates, Saddam Video and China vs. Internet

Friday, December 10, 2010

The leaky faucet of information from WikiLeaks continues even as Julian Assange is in custody. What are this week's findings as reporters sift through the documents? Somali pirates discover underground shipments of weapons to Sudan coming from the Ukraine; an Iraqi ambassador predicts how insurgents will use video of the taunting of Saddam Hussein to recruit, and the portrayal of Chinese leaders as obsessed with the Internet's potential threat to their power. For more on these news bits we speak with Andrew Lehren reporter for our partner The New York Times

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It's A Free Country ®

The Mix: Wikileaks Week

Friday, December 10, 2010

Welcome to It's A Free Country's The Mix, where we take some of the notable clips and other voices found on WNYC this week and mix 'em up. This week, it's all Wikileaks. The Brian Lehrer Show covered the story of the diplomatic cables every day, with a variety of voices, and watched as the conversation moved from the content of the cables to questions over Wikileaks role in our new media landscape. As always, characters in blue, connections in italics.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Daniel Ellsberg On Wikileaks

Friday, December 10, 2010

Read a summary of this conversation at It's A Free Country.

Daniel Ellsberg discusses the Wikileaks case, which he sees as analogous to his 1971 leak of the Pentagon Papers.

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It's A Free Country ®

Echoes of Ellsberg in WikiLeaks Controversy

Friday, December 10, 2010

People who thought Julian Assange or Bradley Manning are immoral now, people like that certainly thought I was immoral at the time. Manning I see as the first person in 40 years who has been willing as he said to go to prison for life or be executed in order to get this information to the American people, and as he said to cause worldwide discussion, debate and reform. That's where I was 40 years ago, and I haven't heard anyone say anything like that in the intervening period.

-Daniel Ellsberg, the whistleblower who leaked the infamous Pentagon Papers in 1971, on The Brian Lehrer Show.  

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It's A Free Country ®

Hacktivism for Wikileaks

Thursday, December 09, 2010

WNYC
Intermediaries are absolutely necessary to ensure that free speech online is robust and strong, and when they're afraid to stand up for their users' right to free speech and help them get that speech out, then users don't have much of a right at all.

Marcia Hoffman, Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Staff Attorney, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Your Take: Wikileaks Drama

Thursday, December 09, 2010

Our listeners have had a lot to say during our coverage of WikiLeaks and the news on Julian Assange, from all parts of the opinion spectrum.   

Kevin from Kansas had this to say: 

Assange is not some hero making us aware of a policy he disagrees with. He just releases as much sensitive information as possible to create damage. What if he was leaking information damaging to you? Prosecute him to the MAX.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Hacktivism and Wikileaks

Thursday, December 09, 2010

To show their support for Wikileaks and its founder, Julian Assange, hackers attacked websites of corporations such as PayPal and MasterCard who have been making it difficult for the controversial site to function. John Abell, New York Bureau Chief for Wired, discusses this recent form of cyber warfare and Marcia Hoffman, Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Staff Attorney, weighs in on the first amendment ramifications of shutting Wikileaks out of funding, or prosecuting them for the cable dumps.

For a summary of their conversation, go to It's A Free Country.

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It's A Free Country ®

WikiLeaks: Are the Critics Wrong?

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

WNYC
Just imagine if on this show today the government's listening and decides there are things that you say or that one of your guests say that it doesn't like or it think harms the national security of the United States and then it starts calling your banks and telling your banks to freeze your funds because what you've done is illegal. And then it starts cutting off your credit cards and preventing people from donating to your station...all informal, all just through pressuring tactics and bullying tactics. Is anyone going to argue...that this is not a major threat to freedom of the press and first ammendment values? That is exactly what they're doing to WikiLeaks.

- Glenn Greenwald, columnist with Salon.com on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Morning Wrap: Mastercard and 'Anonymous' Hacker Group -- Technological Warfare?

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

MasterCard.com, PayPal, and other sites are suffering large-scale attacks from a hacker group called “Anonymous”. The group claims it’s retaliating against companies that have stopped working with WikiLeaks.

Are these prankster antics or the start of a technological war?

Read More

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The Takeaway

Mastercard, Other Sites Brought Down by Wikileaks Supporters

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

All morning, hackers claiming to be fighting back on behalf of Julian Assange and Wikileaks have been attacking major websites that recently stopped offering services to the organization. "Operation Payback" has already brought down Mastercard's site, Paypal is under attack, as is a bank that froze Julian Assange's accounts. Meanwhile, Julian Assange is in custody in England, waiting to see if he'll be extradited to Sweden to face sexual assault charges. Ironically, the attacks on these major sites aren't all that different from similar efforts to bring down Wikileaks itself (one tactic being used is to take down the sites by pure volume of traffic). But how do they really work, and how do hackers decide what to target?   

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The Takeaway

MasterCard, Other Websites Downed by Hackers Supporting Assange

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

A hacker group known as "Anonymous" has reportedly initiated "Operation Payback" a call for attacks on several websites in retaliation for those sites pulling services from Wikileaks in the past 24 hours. So far, Mastercard's website has been brought down, PayPal is under attack as is Swiss bank PostFinance, which recently froze Julian Assange's bank accounts at the institution. We're joined by Rory Cellan-jones, reporter for our partner the BBC, for more on this breaking story.  

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The Brian Lehrer Show

In Defense of WikiLeaks

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

Read a recap of this interview on It's A Free Country.

Glenn GreenwaldSalon.com columnist, former constitutional law and civil rights litigator in New York and the author of Great American Hypocrites: Toppling the Big Myths of Republican Politics, discusses why critics of WikiLeaks are wrong.

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