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Wikileaks

The Takeaway

WikiLeaks Publishes Names of Sources

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Since Wikileaks first began releasing diplomatic cables, the organization has been seen as a threat by the U.S. government and foreign officials. WikiLeaks recently published more than 134,000 diplomatic cables, but unlike previous "document dumps," WikiLeaks published the information themselves rather than working with established media partners like The New York Times and The Guardian. Previously, WikiLeaks would turn over documents to its media partners, which would study and redact the information before releasing it to the public. This time, WikiLeaks chose to release the documents without removing the names of diplomatic sources and other contacts.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Daniel Ellsberg On Wikileaks

Friday, August 19, 2011

Daniel Ellsberg discusses the Wikileaks case, which he sees as analogous to his 1971 leak of the Pentagon Papers.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Pentagon Papers Legacy and WikiLeaks

Friday, August 19, 2011

James Goodale, former vice chairman and general counsel of The New York Times and a lead lawyer in the Pentagon Papers case, discusses the WikiLeaks case on the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Pentagon Papers decision.

It's A Free Country ®

Pentagon Papers Legacy and WikiLeaks

Thursday, June 30, 2011

The great vice in what the government is trying to do is that it's trying to criminalize the journalistic process with respect to getting information that's classified. If in fact they can succeed in the Assange case, they will be taking away a journalistic right that journalists have had for years, which is to talk to a variety of people in order to gather information.

James Goodale, former vice chairman and general counsel of The New York Times and a lead lawyer in the Pentagon Papers case, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

WNYC Archive: 40th Anniversary of the Pentagon Papers

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Forty years ago Thursday, the Supreme Court decided 6-3 in favor of the New York Times in the Pentagon Papers case. Officially known as New York Times Company vs. United States, this is the infamous lawsuit in which the administration of President Richard Nixon tried to stop the Times from publishing classified information about Vietnam War decision making. The papers were leaked to the Times by former government military analyst Daniel Ellsberg. The Court ruled that the First Amendment right to freedom of the press trumped the government's right to stop the Times from publishing its secrets. The decision is considered a hallmark of American journalistic freedom.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Pentagon Papers Legacy and WikiLeaks

Thursday, June 30, 2011

James Goodale, former vice chairman and general counsel of The New York Times and a lead lawyer in the Pentagon Papers case, discusses the WikiLeaks case on the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Pentagon Papers decision.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: What the WikiLeaks Cables Reveal about Haiti

Thursday, June 16, 2011

On this week’s Underreported, Dan Coughlin, reporter for The Nation magazine, Kim Ives, editor for Haiti Liberté, discuss what the WikiLeaks cables reveal about American diplomatic attitudes toward Haiti – both before and after the devasting earthquake there in 2010. A new series of reports about the 1,918 cables that relate to Haiti is being published in a partnership between The Nation and the Haiti Liberté newspaper.

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The Takeaway

Pentagon Papers Revealed, 40 Years Later

Monday, June 13, 2011

The National Archives and Records Administration releases the Pentagon Papers in full for the first time today. When the papers were leaked by Daniel Ellsberg in 1971, Americans learned the truth behind the U.S.’s involvement in Vietnam for the first time. Exactly 40 years ago, on June 13, 1971, The New York Times published the first in a series of articles based on the Pentagon Papers. The Times' decision to publish the classified documents led to a series of legal battles with the Nixon Administration. The Supreme Court finally decided the case, ruling that under the First Amendment, the Times could freely publish the Pentagon Papers.

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The Takeaway

'WikiSecrets': New Documentary on Bradley Manning and WikiLeaks

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

It’s been a year since Bradley Manning was arrested for allegedly handing over a half million classified documents to WikiLeaks, in the biggest intelligence breach in U.S. history. The former Army intelligence analyst remains jailed in the Army brig in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, awaiting his first pre-trial hearing, while WikiLeak’s head Julian Assange lives under police watch in a home near London. Their relationship is the focus of a Frontline documentary "WikiSecrets," airing tonight. Bradley Manning’s father Brian Manning says his son is innocent. He joins Frontline correspondent Martin Smith to discuss his son and the documentary.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks' Lawyer

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Mark Stephens, Julian Assange’s attorney, talks about the effects of Wikileaks on transparency and foreign policy. 

Mark Stephens is taking part in a panel discussion this evening at Columbia Journalism School: Life After WikiLeaks: Who Won the Information War?

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The Takeaway

New WikiLeaks Documents Shed Light on Guantanamo

Monday, April 25, 2011

Nearly 700 classified military documents are part of the latest trove released by WikiLeaks, detailed in a new story by The New York Times. The leaked documents tell new stories of still-detained and already released Guantanamo Bay detainees, providing details of life at the prison. One detail reveals a former prisoner held for several years who now is a rebel fighter in Libya; lists of the "pocket litter" items taken from prisoners pockets when they were captured. Andy Lehren helped break the story for The New York Times and explains what was in the documents.

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The Takeaway

From Gitmo Prisoner to US Ally in Libya?

Monday, April 25, 2011

The New York Times obtained a trove of more than 700 classified documents holding new information about the prisoners being held at Guantanamo Bay. The documents show that most of the 172 prisoners who remain locked up at Guantanamo are “high risk” and pose a threat to our national security if released without proper rehabilitation. But more alarmingly, the documents reveal that nearly 200 of the 600 detainees already released were also rated high risk. Also, surprisingly, one of the prisoners who was released is now fighting with the rebels in Libya. Scott Shane, reporter for The New York Times helps analyze the documents.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks on Gitmo Prisoners

Monday, April 25, 2011

Karen Greenberg, executive director of the Center on Law and Security at NYU Law School, reviews the latest release of documents from WikiLeaks.

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The Washington Report

Washington Report: Wikileaks Documents on Guantanamo Bay

Monday, April 25, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in a recently released trove of Wikileaks documents.

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It's A Free Country ®

The Manning Wikileaks Defense - Is It Free Speech?

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

It is a form of non-violent resistance but it still might have violent consequences. That's why the question quickly becomes not one of law. If he did this, any government, any government—however dedicated to free speech—would punish him, and probably punish him severely.

Floyd Abrams,a visiting professor of First Amendment Law at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Giving Wikileaks a Legal Look

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

Floyd Abrams, a visiting professor of First Amendment Law at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, will give his legal perspective on Bradley Manning, Julian Assange and Wikileaks.

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The Takeaway

WikiLeaks: The Backstory from the Editor of the NY Times

Thursday, January 27, 2011

As WikiLeaks has become a household name over the past year, one of the organizations that has most aided the website's rise to prominence is the New York Times. Through many of the leaks that have changed the landscape and called into question the tenants of journalism, the Times often provided Julian Assange and WikiLeaks with an audience by studying, and publishing the documents it was releasing. As questions about Julian Assange's character grow, so do those about his impact on the world and whether it is positive or negative. Bill Keller, executive editor of the New York Times, talks about dealing with Assange behind the scenes.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Social Media and Revolution

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Clay Shirky, internet guru, professor at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU and author of Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age, discusses the how social media tools are affecting political power structures, especially in the case of the turmoil in Tunisia.

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The Takeaway

WikiLeaks' Next Target: Financial Crimes

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Rudolf Elmer, an ex-employee of the Swiss Bank, Julius Baer, handed over two discs to Julian Assange and WikiLeaks, in a press conference yesterday. The discs reportedly contain information on tax evasion and other crimes of more than 2,000 individuals and companies around the world. Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for The New York Times, sees these events as a preview of what could come shortly, as rumors swirl that WikiLeaks will release damning information on a major American bank; perhaps Bank of America. Is the website's new target corruption in the financial industry?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Spilling Secrets: Wikileaks and The Guardian

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Vanity Fair contributor Sarah Ellison talks about the troubled relationship between The Guardian and Wikileaks. Her article “The Man Who Spilled the Secrets” gives an account of the five months of stops and starts and all the machinations with Julian Assange and his lawyers at The Guardian’s London offices, which led to the publication of WikiLeaks’ cache of diplomatic cables on November 29. “The Man Who Spilled the Secrets” appears in the February issue of Vanity Fair.

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