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Wikileaks

On The Media

Covering the Manning Trial

Friday, March 15, 2013

Coverage of the Manning trial has been inconsistent at best - in part due to a lack of press interest, and in part because the government is making this story difficult to report. Brooke talks to Arun Rath, a reporter for PBS's Frontline and PRI’s The World, who says that few members are actually there following the pre-trial minutiae at Fort Meade. When they are, he says, they’re not in the courtroom, but in the press room.

 

Rahim Alhaj - Dance of the Palms

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Drama, School

Friday, November 23, 2012

We hope you had a happy Thanksgiving! Today we’re rebroadcasting some favorite interviews. We’ll find out the history and future of anonymous information leaks by hackers and activists, like Wikileaks and Anonymous. Tony Danza tells us about his experiences teaching 10th-grade English for a year at Philadelphia’s largest high school, and explains why he wants to apologize to every teacher he’s ever had. Emma Straub talks about her new novel, Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures. Plus, Paul Tough looks at why children’s success depends less on intelligence and more on skills like curiosity, optimism, and self-control.

The Leonard Lopate Show

WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists

Friday, November 23, 2012

Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg traces the history of the activists trying to free the world’s institutional secrets, from the cryptography revolution of the 1970s to Wikileaks’ founding hacker Julian Assange, Anonymous, and beyond. In This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information, he explains how hackers access private files of government agencies and corporations, bringing on a new age of whistle blowing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Activist Hackers

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg traces the history of the activists trying to free the world’s institutional secrets, from the cryptography revolution of the 1970s to Wikileaks’ founding hacker Julian Assange, Anonymous, and beyond. In This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information, he explains how hackers access private files of government agencies and corporations, bringing on a new age of whistle blowing.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Violence in South African mining and the Julian Assange embassy imbroglio

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Violence in South African mining and the Julian Assange embassy imbroglio

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bill Keller On Romney

Friday, August 17, 2012

Bill Keller, op-ed contributor and former executive editor for The New York Times, discusses Mitt Romney's circle of political advisers and donors and explores how these relationships would shape a Romney Administration.  He also discusses the news of Wikileaks chief Julian Assange being granted asylum by Ecuador.

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The Takeaway

Assange Supporter Vaughan Smith on His Extradition

Friday, August 17, 2012

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is sitting it out at Ecuador's embassy in London. Yesterday Ecuador's foreign minister granted him political asylum. But if Assange steps foot out of the embassy, he faces imminent arrest by British authorities and extradition to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sex crimes.

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The Takeaway

Why Ecuador May Have Chosen to Offer Asylum to Assange

Friday, August 17, 2012

The political and economic costs of harboring Julian Assange are high, so why has Ecuadorean president Rafael Correa chosen to do it? Ernesto Capello, Associate Professor of Latin American History at Macalester College, explains.

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The Takeaway

Assange Granted Asylum

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Ecuador's government says it will grant political asylum to the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange. Assange has been inside Ecuador's embassy in London since June. He's been seeking asylum in Ecuador in an effort to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sex crimes. Yesterday, Ecuador's foreign minister said the UK had threatened to enter the embassy to arrest Assange.

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WNYC News

WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange Granted Asylum by Ecuador

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Ecuador said Thursday that it was granting asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, a decision that thrilled supporters but will do little to defuse the standoff at the Latin American nation's London embassy, where the Australian ex-hacker has been holed up for almost two months.

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The Takeaway

Julian Assange, International Fugitive

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Last week the U.K.'s Supreme Court dismissed Julian Assange's bid to reopen his appeal against extradition to Sweden for questioning over alleged sex crimes. Due to his fear of extradition from Sweden to the U.S. to face charges over WikiLeaks, for which he could face the death penalty, he has chosen to break his bail conditions to occupy the Ecuador embassy in London. Rob Broomby from our partner the BBC and Australian journalist Phillip Knightley are following the story.

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The Takeaway

Julian Assange: The Next Oprah?

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

 

From Oprah to Piers Morgan, the world loves a good talk show. And if the multiple seasons of Celebrity Apprentice have taught us anything, audiences also love reality TV shows featuring pseudo celebrities. Yesterday, a program premiered that’s a tiny bit of both. Entitled "The World Today," the new talk show is hosted by Julian Assange, the man most famous for founding WikiLeaks. Alessandra Stanley, television critic for The New York Times, watched the first episode of "The World Today." She shares her thoughts on whether Assange might be the next Ellen, or just another candidate for Celebrity Big Brother.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bradley Manning: Hero or Traitor?

Monday, April 16, 2012

Chase Madar, civil rights attorney and author of the new book The Passion of Bradley Manning, discusses the Army soldier who revealed the content of classified documents through WikiLeaks. 

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The Takeaway

UN Special Rapportuer: Solitary Confinement is Cruel and Unusual Punishment

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

The Eighth Amendment declares that "cruel and unusual punishment" may not be inflicted on prisoners. But does solitary confinement constitute cruel and unusual punishment? In a new report looking at the imprisonment of Bradley Manning, the soldier suspected of leaking confidential military documents to the whistleblowing website Wikileaks, the UN Special Rapporteuer on Torture, Juan Mendez, says that it does. Having just completed a 14-month investigation, Mendez concludes that keeping Manning locked up alone for 23 hours a day over an 11-month period might have constituted torture and has formally accused the U.S. government of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment towards Bradley Manning. 

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The Takeaway

New WikiLeaks Document Dump

Monday, February 27, 2012

This morning the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks began publishing more than 5 million emails from a Texas-based global security analysis company that has been compared to a shadow CIA. WikiLeaks has not explained how it acquired the documents, which belong to the company Stratfor but it's widely believed that WikiLeaks was given the information by the hacker group Anonymous. Hackers linked to Anonymous claim to have stolen emails from Starfor last year. Noah Shachtman is a contributing editor of Wired Magazine and a Fellow at The Brookings Institution.

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The Takeaway

'Incident in New Baghdad': The Effects of War on a Soldier

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

The Oscar-nominated documentary Incident in New Baghdad recounts the 2007 killings of two Reuters reporters by US attack helicopters, footage of which was released by WikiLeaks in 2010. Director Jim Spione [spee-OWN] joins The Takeaway to discuss his film.

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The Takeaway

Closing Arguments in Pre-Trial for Wikileaks Suspect Bradley Manning

Thursday, December 22, 2011

A seven day pre-trial that closes Thursday will determine if Army Pvt. Bradley Manning, a suspect in leaking confidential military and diplomatic intelligence, faces a court-martial. Manning's defense lawyers claim that the Army's computer security was lacking and a faulty chain of command. Meanwhile, his prosecutors have brought 21 witnesses to the stand in the hopes of establishing traitorous intent.

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The Takeaway

Bradley Manning's Pre-Trial Hearing and a Look at Military Secrecy

Monday, December 19, 2011

In Fort Meade, Maryland, a pre-trial investigation to determine whether or not to court-martial Private Bradley Manning is underway. Manning is accused of passing confidential U.S. military documents onto WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. In theory, the Article 32 hearing could give Manning's lawyers the chance to bring up a broad host of issues connected to the case — about military secrecy, for example, and about the personal difficulties Manning, who is gay, struggled with in the Army. However, over the weekend, Army investigators put strict limits on what witnesses Manning can call in his own defense.

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The Takeaway

Assange Loses Extradition Appeal

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Two appeals judges in London ruled on Wednesday that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange can be extradited to Sweden to face rape and sexual assault changes. Assange, who has been under house arrest in a country manor for months, maintains his innocence and contends the charges are politically motivated. Assange and his lawyers will have 14 days to seek an appeal on the European Arrest Warrant. Nick Childs, correspondent for the BBC, reports from the High Court in London.

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On The Media

The Leak at WikiLeaks

Friday, September 02, 2011

This week WikiLeaks released the largest number of US diplomatic cables to date, but the release has been overshadowed by an unredacted leak of its entire cache of cables. Bob talks to Atlantic Wire writer Adam Clark Estes about who's blaming who for the leak at WikiLeaks and what this could mean for WikiLeaks in the future.

Song: Lead Us To The End

Artist: The Quantic Soul Orchestra

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