Streams

 

 

White House

The Takeaway

This week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, June 15, 2009

It's a week full of foreign news: disarray continuing in Iran following the country's hotly contested presidential election; the world reacts to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Mideast peace plan; and U.S. Middle East Envoy George Mitchell is in Syria. On the domestic front, President Obama and Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner are expected to lay out regulation reforms. The Takeaway is joined by Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor for The New York Times, and Jonathan Marcus, Diplomatic Correspondent for the BBC.

"The ball, to some extent, will be in President Obama's court, but he cannot serve that ball until, obviously, the situation in Tehran becomes clearer."
— BBC's Jonathan Marcus on U.S. relations with Iran

Comment

The Takeaway

A Step to Closing Guantanamo? A Detainee in New York

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

The first detainee from Guantanamo Bay prison to face civilian trial in the U.S. pleaded "not guilty" in a New York court on Tuesday. Ahmed Ghailani is charged with helping to coordinate the bombing of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. The transfer and trial of this detainee is viewed as an important step in the Obama administration’s plan to close Guantanamo Bay. The Takeaway talks to Jonathan Mahler author of The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power about what this first trial means for the nation and the detainees.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry

Monday, June 08, 2009

The Takeaway gives you your weekly rundown of the stories to keep an eye on. This week there's a battle brewing between the finance sector and the Obama administration as some banks prepare to pay back TARP funds. Iran's elections kick off as Lebanon's conclude. And this week's Apple software developer's conference may see the return of Steve Jobs. For that and more we're joined by Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor for our partners, The New York Times.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Agenda: What's In Store for the Week Ahead

Monday, June 01, 2009

The Takeaway talks to Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor for The New York Times, and BBC Arab Affairs Analyst Magdi Abdel Hadi about what's in the headlines for the week ahead. Topics include President Obama and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner hitting the road, GM contining the long, slow walk to bankruptcy, and predictions that unemployment numbers may hit nine percent for the first time in a quarter of a century.
"I expect both sides to really be diplomatic and conciliatory this week and to really talk a lot about being partners."
—New York Times international business editor Marcus Mabry on U.S. relations with China

Comment

The Takeaway

What Does Supreme Court Diversity Mean?

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Of the 110 U.S. Supreme Court justices in history, only eleven have been Catholic. But if Judge Sonia Sotomayor is confirmed as the newest member on the bench, there will be six Catholic judges on the bench at once. That begs the question: What does diversity on the Supreme Court mean? Is it about race, religion, or gender? Or should it be about something bigger? The Takeaway talks to Nadine Strossen, the former President of the ACLU who is currently a professor at New York Law School. Also joining the conversation is John Allen, the senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter.

Comment

The Takeaway

China's Role in North Korea's High-Stakes Game

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

North Korea continues to raise the stakes in its game of nuclear poker, conducting a second nuclear test in as many days on Tuesday. Meanwhile, a South Korean newspaper has reported that U.S. spy satellites have detected signs that North Korea has started up its nuclear plant again. The international community has condemned Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions. But the only country with real clout over North Korea is China: the nation is North Korea’s neighbor and main trading partner. To find out China's take on the North Korea situation, The Takeaway talks to John Pomfret, author of Chinese Lessons: Five Classmates and the Story of the New China. He writes the blog Pomfret’s China on the Newsweek/Washington Post website.

Comment

The Takeaway

Nukes, Hawks and Ambassador John Bolton

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Just hours after the U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's nuclear tests, Pyongyang tested more missiles. President Obama criticized the tests, prompting North Korea to respond that its "army and people are fully ready for battle... against any reckless U.S. attempt for a pre-emptive attack."

An American attack is extremely unlikely. But what clout does the U.S. or the international community have? The Takeaway turns to John Bolton: he served as the Permanent U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations from August 2005 until December 2006 and is currently a Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.
"The next step really ought to be the kind of sweeping economic sanctions that were imposed on Iraq after it invaded Kuwait in 1990. That would be a real sign."
—Former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton on the U.S. response to North Korea

Click through for transcript

In case you missed the President's remarks on North Korea, here they are:

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

National Security: Obama's Plan for Guantanamo Bay

Thursday, May 21, 2009

This morning President Obama will deliver what the White House is calling a major national security speech. At least part of his speech will detail his plan to close the Guantanamo Bay Detention Center. But with Congressman, Senators and even FBI Director Robert Mueller lining up against the closure of Guantanamo, what can Obama possibly say? The Takeaway talks to Jonathan Mahler. He’s a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and author of the book The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power.
"It's a diplomatic challenge. It's a political challenge. It's a national security challenge. And it's really an almost impossible situation for him."
—Writer Jonathan Mahler on the closing of Guantanamo Bay

Comment

The Takeaway

Join the Team! Obama Sends GOP Governor to China

Monday, May 18, 2009

President Obama has appointed Utah's Republican Governor Jon Huntsman as his Ambassador to China. Many say it’s a politically savvy move that will ensure the moderate Republican Huntsman,a Mormon who co-chaired John McCain's campaign, is out of the running as a candidate for the 2012 presidential election. The Takeaway talks to Alexander Burns, a reporter for Politico.

Here's the President announcing his choice of Jon Huntsman:

Comment

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, May 18, 2009

It’s Monday: time to ask our guests what will we'll see in the news this week. For a look at the agenda of the week ahead, we’re joined by Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor of The New York Times and by Jonathan Marcus, Diplomatic Correspondent for the BBC.
"A lot of people have talked about a train wreck in Israel/U.S. relationships, and that's not going to happen in this meeting. I think there are going to be smiles all around."
—BBC correspondent Jonathan Marcus on Benjamin Netanyahu coming to Washington

Comment

The Takeaway

Hip Hop Artists Are In the (White) House

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

On the campaign trail, President Barack Obama said that no one should graduate from university without having read poetry. He also promised that he would open up the White House to a wide range of people. Last night he made progress on both promises when the White House hosted a poetry slam (or more accurately, a poetry jam because it wasn’t a competition, but instead an open mic night that included slam poets, musicians and spoken-word artists. James Earl Jones read a piece and among the performers were two young spoken word poets from Youth Speaks, a non-profit organization in San Francisco for teens. One of the young poets, Joshua Brandon Bennett, joins The Takeaway to perform some of his poetry and talk about the experience. Also joining the conversation is Jeff Chang, journalist and author of Can't Stop, Won't Stop, the award-winning history of hip-hop.

To get a taste of what went on at the poetry jam, watch this clip of Joshua Bennett freestyling.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

About Face: Pentagon Shifts Command in Afghanistan

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

The Pentagon has asked for the resignation of General David McKiernan, the commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan. McKiernan will likely be replaced by Lieutenant General Stanley McChrystal, a former special operations commander chosen by Defense Secretary Robert Gates. So what does the shake-up indicate about U.S. military strategy in Afghanistan? The Takeaway talks to Retired Air Force Colonel Sam Gardiner. He's taught strategy and military operations at the National War College.
"Normally you don't replace commanders during combat. One of the reasons you don't is because it has an effect on the troops. The troops will interpret this, or question 'Is this because I'm not doing a good job?'"
—Retired Air Force Colonel Sam Gardiner on the replacement of General David McKiernan

Comment

The Takeaway

On the Agenda for This Week, from Marcus Mabry

Monday, May 11, 2009

It’s Monday, and we’re taking a look at the agenda for the week ahead: From the Pope's mission to the Middle East to a Senate subcommittee hearing on torture to the Credit Cardholders' Bill of Rights. The Takeaway is joined by our friend Marcus Mabry, the international business editor of The New York Times.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Urkel and Obama: The rise of the black nerd

Tuesday, May 05, 2009

The election of Barack Obama may have had what we'll call The Urkel Effect. Takeaway Contributor and Senior Editor at Essence Magazine, Patrik Henry Bass says the rise of the bookish President may clear a path for people once maligned as nerds and bookworms. And he says that may have a particularly strong impact in the black community, especially in conjunction with the rise of authors such as Colson Whitehead and Trey Ellis.

Which books were on Patrik's list?


Barack Obama may be President, but will he get his own breakfast cereal like Urkel?

Comment

The Takeaway

Fuzzy Math? Jobs and the Economic Recovery Act

Monday, May 04, 2009

In his prime time press conference last week, President Obama credited his Economic Recovery Act with the creation of 150,000 jobs. It's an astonishing number. But is this a case of some slightly fuzzy math? The Takeaway talks to Political Director Andrea Bernstein.

If you missed last week's press conference, you can see President Obama's take on job creation below:

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Texas case challenges Voting Rights Act in Supreme Court

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The Supreme Court will hear a challenge today that goes to the heart of the Voting Rights Act. This landmark piece of legislation was enacted in 1965 to prevent racial discrimination at the polls. The section of the law at the center of the case requires some states, primarily those in the South, to get federal approval before they can change any of their voting procedures. The changes that require approval from the Justice Department can be as big as a redistricting plan or as small as moving a polling place to a new location. A Texas community got approval for a move, but still decided to take their case to the Supreme Court.

When the U.S. Supreme Court hears the case today, it will be deciding the fate of a hard-fought piece of civil rights legislation. But now that we have an African American president, some say we no longer need the protections afforded by this act. Is the need to protect minorities at the polls outdated? The Takeaway talks to Ted Shaw. He’s a professor at Columbia University Law School and Of Counsel to the law firm of Fulbright and Jaworksi.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Beyond Black Hawk Down: U.S. involvement in Somalia

Thursday, April 23, 2009

A donor’s conference for Somalia is underway today in Brussels. The United Nations hopes to raise more than $250 million to improve security in the anarchic nation. This comes on the heels of United Nations Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, has said it is too dangerous to send UN peacekeepers to Somalia and that it could exacerbate the armed conflict there. Also attending the donor's conference is Somali President Sheikh Sharif, a former Islamist rebel leader elected in January at U.N.-brokered talks and widely seen as the best hope for restoring stability. While Somali gangs have made headlines seizing ships in the Indian Ocean, U.S. involvement in Somalia goes beyond our recent adventures with Somali pirates on the high seas.

The Takeaway is taking a deeper look at U.S. interests in Somalia with Bronwyn Bruton, a Somalia expert with the Council on Foreign Relations and with the BBC’s Mike Wooldrige in Brussels who is reporting on the donors' conference.
"We need to try hard to help the Somalis understand that we're not out to get them, and I'm not sure we're doing a good job of that right now."
—Bronwyn Bruton of the Council on Foreign Relations on U.S. relations with Somalia

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Congressman Jerrold Nadler reacts to possible inquiry into CIA interrogation tactics

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

On Tuesday, President Obama made it clear that he is leaving open the possibility of investigating the members of the Bush administration who authorized the use of so-called enhanced interrogation techniques against terror suspects. The use of waterboarding, hanging from the ceiling, and other tactics could constitute illegal torture and President Obama suggested creating a commission to investigate these potential abuses. The President's remarks on Tuesday caused both controversy and confusion in light of earlier statements by both Mr. Obama and his staff that suggested he was interested in turning the page on the past abuses and moving forward. To help us understand what Congress is thinking about this issue, The Takeaway talks to the man in charge, New York Congressman Jerrold Nadler, who is Chair of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.
"Even the people who actually did torture in the CIA, if they reasonably relied on instructions or legal guidance from the Justice Department, they should not be prosecuted."
—Congressman Jerrold Nadler on investigating interrogators

Did you miss the President's remarks to the CIA? Here they are:

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

The U.S. casts an eye to South Africa's elections

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Fifteen years ago, Nelson Mandela swept to an historic victory to become the first black President of South Africa. That victory was the start of the dominance of Mandela's African National Congress Party. A decade and a half later, the African National Congress Party's candidate, Jacob Zuma, is again poised to reign supreme. Today is the last day of campaigning before South Africans head to the polls on Wednesday.

To help us understand what Zuma's presumed leadership will mean for South Africa and what the U.S. will be watching in this election, The Takeaway talks to Dan Simpson. Simpson is currently an editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Before taking the reigns at the paper, he was Director of Southern African Affairs in the State Department in the 1980s and has been U.S. Ambassador to several African countries.

Comment

The Takeaway

Jordan's King Abdullah visits the White House

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

President Barack Obama is set to meet with King Abdullah of Jordan today. This is his first major meeting with a leader from the Middle East and the leader is not Israeli. It has long been standard practice for U.S. Presidents to meet with Israeli leaders first, before reaching out to their Arab counterparts. Earlier this week Press Secretary Robert Gibbs described Jordan as a close ally and partner of the United States. But is this international friendship worth the risk of appearing to snub the Israeli government? For more we turn to the BBC's Jonathan Marcus.

Comment