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Welfare

WNYC News

De Blasio Looks For New Ways To Get People From Welfare to Work

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The de Blasio administration is dismantling a core program at the center of decades of welfare reform.

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The Takeaway

How Your Tax Dollars Subsidize Low Wages

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

A new study finds that companies like Walmart and McDonalds often pay employees such low wages that many are driven to federal assistance programs to make ends meet.

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WNYC News

Stabbing of NJ Welfare Worker Shines Spotlight on Police Cuts

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The stabbing of a state case worker in Camden is raising questions about the Christie Administration's decision to remove police officers from New Jersey's welfare offices.

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WNYC News

City Routinely Loses Legal Challenges To Welfare Cuts

Thursday, July 31, 2014

WNYC

A new report shows that while New York City routinely cuts benefits for welfare recipients citing missed meetings or insufficient documentation it loses 8 out of every 10 cases when the cuts are challenged in court.

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FT Big Read

US unemployment: a long term trap?

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

A long term trap? James Politi reports on US joblessness

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Parenthood and Poverty in the Inner City

Monday, April 07, 2014

For this week’s installment of our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, Kathryn Edin and Timothy J. Nelson examine the problems of extreme poverty in cities like Camden, NJ (the poorest city in the country), Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The also investigate a number of the questions many have about the urban poor, such as: How do single mothers survive on welfare? Why were so many low-income women having children without marrying, when doing so seems so difficult? Where are the fathers and why do they disengage from their children’s lives? Why don’t more people work? Their book Doing the Best I Can: Fatherhood in the Inner City is based on a multi-year ethnographic study of black and white low-income, unmarried fathers in inner-city Philadelphia and Camden and shows how major economic and cultural shifts have transformed the meaning of fatherhood among the urban poor.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Who Relies on the Social Safety Net?

Monday, March 24, 2014

The notions of the Welfare Queen and of unemployed poor people taking advantage of federal programs like welfare and food stamps are hard to shake in our society, but they don’t represent a real picture of who relies on these safety net programs and why.

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The Takeaway

Report Links Government Neglect to Deaths of Hundreds of Florida Children

Monday, March 17, 2014

After sorting through six years of files, the Miami Herald has revealed that at least 477 children died of abuse or neglect—even though their homes had already been investigated and flagged by the state. The vast majority of victims were under 5-years-old, and over 70 percent were under 2 years of age. Were these deaths preventable? Were these children betrayed by the very state agency that was charged to protect them? Carol Marbin Miller, an investigative reporter for the Miami Herald who worked on this report, joins The Takeaway to explain.

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WNYC News

Paying Kids to Go to School: Can it Work?

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

The city is trying to motivate kids by paying them to go to school, get good grades and pass standardized tests. The theory is that rewarding good choices in health, education and work leads to permanent changes in habits and behavior, breaking the cycle of intergenerational poverty.

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On The Media

The Real Story of the Welfare Queen

Friday, December 20, 2013

In the late 1970s, Ronald Reagan told the story of a woman in Chicago who became known as the welfare queen, the embodiment of the problems with the welfare state. Like most myths, there’s some grain of truth embedded in this narrative: there was a woman in Chicago who was indicted on welfare fraud,  but her other crimes were far more grave. Brooke speaks with Josh Levin, executive editor of Slate, about his investigation of Linda Taylor, America’s original welfare queen.

Ike & Tina Turner - I Smell Trouble

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Planet Money on Disability

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Chana Joffe-Walt, reporter for NPR's Planet Money, discusses her This American Life piece  on the rise in the number of people on disability.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: Holes in the Safety Net

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

30 Issues in 30 Days is our election year series on the important issues facing the country this election year. Today: Where the government stands in its coverage of the neediest Americans. Visit the 30 Issue home page for all the conversations.

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It's A Free Country ®

Explainer: Did Obama 'Gut' Welfare Reform?

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

It’s totally bogus to charge President Obama with “gutting” welfare work requirements. Here's why.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: GOP Should Welcome the Spending Cuts They Bargained For

Friday, July 27, 2012

Mandatory spending cuts are on the horizon, and the party of fiscal discipline doesn't do itself any favors by running from them.

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The Takeaway

Why It’s So Hard to End Poverty in America

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Poverty is one of the most pressing and divisive issues of our day, and Democrats and Republicans have staked out largely different approaches to the increasing divide between the poorest members of the United States and the richest. With the economy central to the November elections, the wealth gap will likely only become even more talked about in the months to come. Peter Edelman, one of the most outspoken antipoverty advocates in the country, examines the current state of poverty in the country, and elaborates upon what can be done — and what hasn't.

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WNYC News

Overcrowded Welfare Offices Causing Hardship for Poor

Tuesday, January 03, 2012

Advocates for the poor say welfare offices across the city have become seriously overcrowded, causing struggling New Yorkers to wait hours for assistance.



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The Brian Lehrer Show

Nickel and Dimed Again

Monday, August 08, 2011

Author Barbara Ehrenreich discusses the new afterword to her 2001 bestselling book, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, and how it relates to today's bleak economic picture.

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It's A Free Country ®

Bullhorn: The Narrow Debate on Race Distorts Political Labels

Sunday, October 03, 2010

“You’re not as conservative as I thought!” I hear this all the time. I’ve learned that when media outlets seek me out, it is best to let them know early on that I cannot serve as right-wing “balance” in a quest for a “diversity” of black voices, and that my politics are best described as cranky liberal.

But that’s not the reputation that precedes me. Why the confusion? Because I write about race politics, and when you venture into that territory, today’s narrow view of what’s acceptably liberal quickly distorts ideological labels.

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The Takeaway

Americans Struggle as Poverty Rises

Friday, September 17, 2010

The U.S. Census Bureau released a report yesterday showing that in 2009, more than 14 percent of the population was living in poverty: It's a rate that hasn't been seen in the U.S. since the early '90s. Looking ahead into 2010's statistics, economists fear poverty will soon be higher than at any time since the 1960s, before President Lyndon B. Johnson declared the War on Poverty, as part of his Great Society initiative.  We discuss what can be done to fight poverty in America and how the government defines being poor. 

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The Takeaway

Listeners Respond: Government Aid

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Yesterday we spoke about the large number of Americans receiving public assistance, and the story got you commenting as well. Listeners weighed in with their own personal stories about work and the issue of pride when you are getting help from the government.

 

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