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Waterfront

WNYC News

After Years of Delays, Sunset Park Residents Celebrate New Waterfront Park

Thursday, November 13, 2014

WNYC
The Sunset Park waterfront was once a dumping ground for local industry. But now it's now home to a 23-acre park with a bicycle path, tidal ponds and sports fields. 

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WNYC News

The 8% Solution: City Asks for Help to Bolster Low-Lying Coast

Thursday, October 02, 2014

WNYC
Some 43 miles of waterfront could be flooded on daily basis due to sea level rise by 2050. The city is asking experts how to prevent that.

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WNYC News

Beach Planned for Under the Brooklyn Bridge

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Yes. Or, at least, there will be.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

On the Waterfront

Friday, June 28, 2013

Justin Davidson, New York magazine’s architecture and classical music critic, discusses the New York City waterfront and Mayor Bloomberg’s resiliency plan. He The looks at the history of the city’s relationship to the waterfront, and argues that we should double down on developing it rather than retreat. Davidson's article "Liquid City" is in the July 1 issue of New York.

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WNYC News

A Critic’s Tour: New Parks Along the Waterfront

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Sandy exposed the city's vulnerability to flooding, just as development along the water's edge has been booming. Waterfront parks are part of that growth and they could have a unique advantage helping the city deal with rising waters. James Russell, an architecture critic with Bloomberg News, took WNYC on a tour of these developing esplanades, which are transforming the city’s waterfront.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Defending New York City Against Hurricanes

Thursday, February 28, 2013

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, there have been a number of proposals to waterproof the New York waterfront. One idea is to erect large—and expensive—storm surge barriers. Alex Marshall, author of "The $5.9 Billion Question" in the February issue of Metropolis magazine and author of the new book The Surprising Design of Market Economies, Malcolm Bowman, distinguished professor of oceanography at SUNY Stonybrook, Piet Dircke, and global director for water management for ARCADIS, talk about the proposals.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Future of New York's Waterfront

Thursday, November 15, 2012

We take a look at the future of New York’s waterfront post-Sandy and discuss some innovative ways to protect the harbor and city. Guests include: Justin Davidson, classical music and architecture critic at New York magazine; Eric Sanderson, author of Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City and a Senior Conservation Ecologist at the Wildlife Conservation Society;Catherine Seavitt Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Spitzer School of Architecture, City College of New York and co-author of On The Water: Palisade Bay.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Tiny Museums: The Waterfront Museum

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

David Sharps, president of The Waterfront Museum, talks about what visitors can learn about New York City's barges and waterfront history at the museum.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Rising Water

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Hurricane Irene demonstrated the risks of flooding along NYC's waterfront. Stephen Cassell and Adam Yarinsky, principals at Architecture Research Office LLC, offered solutions for Lower Manhattan as part of a recent MOMA exhibition on global warming, now in book form: Rising Currents: Projects for New York's Waterfront.

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WNYC News

Council Examines Sewage Spill Impact on Waterfront Businesses

Monday, September 19, 2011

WNYC

The sewage spill that for a time rendered the city's rivers unsafe for recreation this summer has prompted the City Council's Waterfront Committee to look for ways to improve the city's notifications to businesses directly affected.

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WNYC News

City Reclaims Waterfront as 'Sixth Borough'

Monday, March 14, 2011

WNYC

New York is a city of vast and diverse waterfront — with more than that of Seattle, San Francisco, Chicago and Portland combined. But much of its 520-mile shoreline has been underutilized or neglected for decades. Now, city officials are hoping a new, 10-year strategic plan unveiled Monday will provide a framework for the city to reclaim its standing as a world class waterfront city.

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