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Washington Dc

PRI's The World

Undocumented Asian immigrants shy away from revealing their status

Thursday, August 28, 2014

The immigration debate often centers on people from Latin America, but many undocumented immigrants are Asian. Yet Asian communities are seeking out help and enrolling in a government anti-deportation program at much lower rates than Latinos, thanks to stigma over being undocumented.

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PRI's The World

Conservationists are working to create more national parks at sea

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Here’s some positive environmental news. In fact, it's a positive environmental trend: nations across the world are protecting huge swaths of ocean waters. And the trend may just be getting started.

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Has Already Outlawed Uber's New Taxi Service

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

WAMU

Two weeks after launching a new taxi service in Washington, the popular tech start-up Uber says regulators are shutting it down because the cars are too small.

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Transportation Nation

Why Is D.C.'s Metropolitan Branch Bike Trail Taking So Long to Build?

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

WAMU

Despite the lack of on-the-ground progress for more than two years, Washington D.C. transportation officials say the Metropolitan Branch Trail is not languishing in planning rooms and that funding has been budgeted to complete the D.C. portion of the eight-mile, off-street bicycling and pedestrian path.

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Transportation Nation

D.C.'s Outer Beltway Plan Draws Ferocious Opposition, as Business Leaders Cry For More Lanes

Friday, May 31, 2013

WAMU

A plan to add roadways to the D.C. suburbs is drawing fierce opposition. The so called "outer beltway" project stole the show at a recent public meeting, hinting at the ferocity of resistance in store for the plan to build a 45-mile, north-south corridor in the western suburbs of Washington. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mental Health Guide; DC Developments; College Inequality

Monday, April 15, 2013

There might be compromise in the air in Washington, DC. Bob Cusack, managing editor for The Hill, talks about possible deals on gun legislation, immigration and the budget. Then, Lloyd Sederer, medical director of New York State’s Office of Mental Health, about his new guide for mental healthcare written for families. Plus: a 5-year study of a group of women in college shows inequality in college education; and news headlines from your hometowns.

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Ted Sorensen Writes with Affection and Respect for the Kennedy Clan

Monday, December 31, 2012

WNYC

When a "member of the opposition" said that he had read Ted Sorensen's new book, Kennedy, and that he didn't like it very much, Sorenson replied that he was surprised, because "I didn't know you could read." Thus the sharp-tongued attorney and political advisor begins his talk before a 1965 Book and Authors Luncheon.

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Soundcheck

Go-Go: The Beat of D.C.

Friday, May 18, 2012

Earlier this week, Washington D.C. music legend Chuck Brown died at age 75. Brown was known as the Godfather of Go-Go: the funky, bluesy sound that was born in, and helped define, African-American life in the city - particularly in the 1970s and '80s. These days, you’re more likely to find it in the suburbs, if you can find it at all. We talk with Natalie Hopkinson, author of the social history “Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City.”

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

National Gallery Director J. Carter Brown, 1971

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Views on Art host Ruth Bowman interviews J. Carter Brown (1934-2002), the director of the National Gallery from 1969 to 1992. 

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The Takeaway

Listeners Respond: Are You Voting Today?

Tuesday, April 03, 2012

Republican primaries take place today in Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia. We're checking in with voters today, including Mitt Romney supporter Deborah Edattel in D.C., conservative blogger David Blaska in Wisconsin, Peg Edquist from Wisconsin, and Santorum supporter Julaine Appling from Wisconsin. 

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On The Media

Website Tracks D.C. Homicides in Real Time

Friday, November 04, 2011

When Laura Amico launched the website Homicide Watch D.C., her intent was to create a comprehensive record of all the murders in the District. Little more than a year later, the site has become more than a somber document for posterity: it's a bona fide newsbreaker, often identifying victims before police do.

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The Takeaway

Who Are the 'Gang of Six'?

Monday, April 18, 2011

They represent what may be the last great hope for a grand compromise on the budget crisis facing America. Their success or failure could mean either a new tone in Washington or a long fight to the finish of the 2012 elections. The fight also includes everything from raised retirement age and Medicare changes to higher taxes. But who are the Gang of Six? With the help of Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, we take a closer look at six men in whose hands the fate of a giant policy resolution may rest.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: The Budget Deal

Monday, April 11, 2011

Listeners: Wherever you are on the political spectrum, do you feel like your leaders sold you out? Or are you happy with their leadership? Give us a call or comment here!

Comments [19]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Week Ahead: Nuclear Policy, Budget Showdown, More

Monday, March 14, 2011

Susan Page, USA Today Washington bureau chief, talks about the week ahead in Congress and the White House response to domestic and international events.  Joseph Romm, senior fellow at Center for American Progress and founder of the blog, ClimateProgress.org, joins the conversation and discusses U.S. nuclear energy policy in light of what's happened in Japan in the aftermath of last week's earthquake.

Listen, Read a Recap, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Three Presidents Walk Into a Bar...

Friday, January 28, 2011

The lobby of Washington, D.C.'s Mayflower Hotel has seen more than its fair share of presidents and political elite. The hotel's piano bar has become a social scene for presidents within the hotel, from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Harry Truman, Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter. Our partners at the BBC spoke with the one man who's seen it all go down, and provided the entertainment along the way — Dan Ruskin, the piano man.

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The Takeaway

Federal Deficit to Hit $1.5 Trillion

Thursday, January 27, 2011

The federal deficit is set to top $1.5 trillion this year. It's a huge number, but does it even mean anything anymore? Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich says that competing budget plans are popping up all around the Capitol as lawmakers try to find ways to cut as much as possible. The Republican leadership in the House says they will cut $100 billion from the budget this fiscal year. Meanwhile, President Obama has proposed a $400 billion cut over ten years. As the Republicans look for deeper and deeper cuts, the Democrats warn that this could shock the economy back into a recession.

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The Takeaway

Congress Convenes Without a Kennedy For the First Time in Nearly 50 Years

Monday, December 27, 2010

When the 112th Congress convenes next week, it will be the first class of legislators in nearly fifty years that does not include a member of the Kennedy clan. From Jack to Bobby to Ted to Joseph, and finally to Patrick — who decided against running for reelection this year as representative from Rhode Island  — the Kennedys have been a mainstay in Washington D.C. for decades.

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The Takeaway

A Very Political Thanksgiving

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Thanksgiving approaches, a holiday full of yearly traditions for families across the country. As Americans begin to prepare turkey, mashed potatoes and cranberries for their Thanksgiving meals, we decided to take look at how our nation's capital celebrates this holiday. It seems that Washington lobbyists have their own special traditions in November, and the food we enjoy each Thanksgiving arrives infused with political influence. 

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The Takeaway

Signs and Impressions from the 'Rally to Restore Sanity'

Sunday, October 31, 2010

What struck me most about Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's "Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear?" The attendees were not the people that Washington thinks they are. Yes, there were plenty of college students, pot smokers, and 20-somethings who rarely vote.  But of the 20 people that I spoke to as they passed by me on the National Mall, not one of them fit that description.  In fact, only two were younger than 40. 

Many politicians (on both sides of the aisle) are comfortable dismissing the Daily Show and Colbert crowd as not serious, and non-voting.  I think that's a mistake.  The majority of the people I saw were middle-aged or retired, politically active, and fed up with politics. 

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The Takeaway

Commission Considers How to Reduce Burgeoning National Debt

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

There's growing concern about the national debt: currently a gulp-inducing $13 trillion... and counting. President Obama's National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform is tasked with coming up with proposals to begin solving the problem later this year. We speak with Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), ranking member on the Senate Budget Committee, and a member of the bipartisan deficit-reduction commission.

Comments [4]