Streams

 

War On Terror

The Takeaway

Pentagon Transfers 6 Guantánamo Prisoners

Friday, July 18, 2014

The Pentagon has secretly notified Congress that the military intends to transfer six low-level Guantánamo Bay detainees to Uruguay as early as next month. It would be the first transfer of Guantánamo detainees since the prisoner swap released U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl.

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The Takeaway

The Case for Inaction in Iraq and Syria

Friday, July 11, 2014

Has the U.S.'s failure to intervene in Syria ultimately allowed ISIS to grow in power and spread to Iraq? Owen Bennet-Jones, host of Newshour on the BBC World Service, argues that inaction might be the wisest response.

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The Takeaway

The World's Richest Jihadi Group

Monday, June 23, 2014

Business is booming as the Sunni militants of ISIS loot banks, traffic weapons, and most recently, capture an oil refinery. How did the group get such deep pockets? And will they keep getting deeper? 

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The Takeaway

Al Qaeda Offshoot Captures Iraqi City

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

The Iraqi military was seen abandoning their weapons and fleeing the city of 1 million while the militants took control of government buildings and military bases, and freed hundreds of prisoners.

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Radiolab

60 Words

Friday, April 18, 2014

How one sentence -- just 60 words written in the hours after the September 11 attacks -- became the legal foundation for the "war on terror."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dexter Filkins: Covering War Distorts Everything

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The New Yorker staff writer tells guest host Sarah Jessica Parker about his experiences covering war in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America in Afghanistan since 2001

Monday, April 07, 2014

Carlotta Gall talks about reporting from Afghanistan and Pakistan since shortly after 9/11 and gives a sweeping account of a war brought by well-intentioned American leaders against an enemy they barely understood and could not truly engage. Her book The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014, combines personal accounts of battles and betrayals with moving portraits of ordinary Afghanis who have endured war for more than a decade.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Insider Attacks in Afghanistan

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Journalist Matthieu Aikins lives in Kabul and has been reporting from Afghanistan since 2008. He examines the troubling rise and potential causes of “insider attacks” in Afghanistan and looks at whether we’ll ever be able to leave the country. His article “Portrait of an Assassin” is in the October 7 issue of Mother Jones.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mark Mazzetti on the CIA's Shadow War

Friday, August 30, 2013

Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter Mark Mazzetti gives an account of the transformation of the CIA and America’s special operations forces into man-hunting and killing machines around the world. In The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth, Mazzetti tells the story of that shadow war, a campaign that has blurred the lines between soldiers and spies.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Drone Strike Compensation Payments?

Thursday, August 15, 2013

There have been nine reported drone strikes reported in Yemen in the past two weeks, and there have been as many as six civilian deaths reported. Cora Currier, ProPublica Reporting Fellow, talks about drone strikes and whether the United States is paying families when drone strikes kill innocent Yemenis. She’s investigated in her article “Does the U.S. Pay Families When Drones Kill Innocent Yemenis?

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"Dirty Wars"

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Jeremy Scahill and Richard Rowley talk about the documentary “Dirty Wars.” Directed by Rowley, “Dirty Wars” follows investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill as he covers America’s covert wars, from Afghanistan to Yemen, Somalia and beyond. The film unfolds through Scahill’s investigation and personal journey as he chases down one of the most important stories of our time. "Dirty Wars" opens at IFC Center and Lincoln Plaza Cinemas.

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The Takeaway

President Obama Seeks to Narrow 'War on Terror'

Friday, May 24, 2013

In the first major counter-terrorism speech of his second term, President Obama outlined guidelines for the use of drone strikes, laid out plans to close Guantanamo and sought to find a way to finally end the war on terror.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Next Phase in the War on Terror

Friday, May 24, 2013

Justin Vogt, senior editor for Foreign Affairs, and Jess Bravin, Supreme Court correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and the author of The Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay (Yale University Press, 2013), offer analysis of President Obama's speech on national security and counter-terrorism.

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The Takeaway

President Obama Seeks to Narrow 'War on Terror,' A Closer Look at the IRS Inquiry, Boy Scouts to Allow Gay Members

Friday, May 24, 2013

President Obama Seeks to Narrow 'War on Terror' | What's Next in IRS Inquiry? | The Boy Scouts Vote to Allow Openly Gay Members | Listener Wisdom for the Class of 2013 | Oklahoma High School Seniors Graduate in Tornado's Aftermath | Movie Date: 'The Hangover Part III,' 'We Steal Secrets,' 'Fast & Furious 6'

The Takeaway

Afghanistan and the Struggle to Walk Away

Monday, May 20, 2013

There is a name for the human tendency to allow a questionable decision to overstay its usefulness and to stick with something when its harm is clear and the damage is evident to all. Economists call it "the sunk cost fallacy." CNN Chief Washington Correspondent Jake Tapper's book, “The Outpost: An Untold Story of American Valor,” is about a lot of things, including how tough it is to walk away from a place where so many lives have been lost.

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The Takeaway

How Long Will the War on Terror Last?

Monday, May 20, 2013

How long will the war on terror last?  Another five years? Or ten years? That question was put to a senior Pentagon official by Congress last week during hearings by the Senate Armed Services Committee over whether to revise the AUMF, the Authorization to Use Military Force. Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist and author of the book, “The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War,” explains what the AUMF means and why its extension matters.

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The Takeaway

The IRS Scandal: The Criminal Investigation, Afghanistan and the Struggle to Walk Away, Does Medicare Part D Care About Safety?

Monday, May 20, 2013

The IRS Scandal: The Criminal Investigation | How Long Will the War on Terror Last? | Afghanistan and the Struggle to Walk Away | Tornadoes Tear Through the Midwest | Does Medicare Part D Care About Safety? | Why We Stay When We Know We Should Leave | Yahoo to Buy Social Media Site Tumblr

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mark Mazzetti on the CIA's Secret Army and Shadow War

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter Mark Mazzetti gives an account of the transformation of the CIA and America’s special operations forces into man-hunting and killing machines around the world. In The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth, Mazzetti tells the story of that shadow war, a campaign that has blurred the lines between soldiers and spies.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Terror Courts, Rita Moreno, Phone Phreaks, Morality and Technology

Monday, March 04, 2013

The Wall Street Journal’s Supreme Court correspondent Jess Bravin and government prosecutor Lt. Col. Stuart Crouch talk about the courts at Guantanamo Bay, where suspected Al Qaeda terrorists are tried. Rita Moreno looks back at her career on stage and screen. She’s one of the few artists to win Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Awards. We’ll look at the underground network of “phone phreaks” who managed to hack into the country’s telephone system. Plus, the political and moral dilemmas posed by the technological efficiencies of the digital age.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Guantanamo Bay Terror Courts

Monday, March 04, 2013

Jess Bravin, the Wall Street Journal’s Supreme Court correspondent, and Lt. Col. Stuart Couch, a government prosecutor, talk about the terror courts at Guantanamo Bay, set up after the September 11 attacks in 2001, to hold captured suspected al-Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world. In his book The Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay, Bravin describes the U.S. effort to create a parallel justice system for enemy aliens, and argues that a maze of legal, political, and moral issues has stood in the way of justice—issues often raised by military prosecutors who found themselves torn between duty to the chain of command and their commitment to fundamental American values.

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