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War

The Takeaway

Burn Pits Leave Lasting Mark on Soldiers' Health

Thursday, October 31, 2013

For some time now, doctors have seen an alarming number of veterans return from the front lines with respiratory diseases and rare forms of cancer-- and it may have to do with the way the military is getting rid of its garbage. Congressman Tim Bishop, a Democrat from New York, is one of the legislators behind a bipartisan effort to regulate the military's use of burn pits. Katie Drummond, science editor for the news site The Verge, recently investigated how these burn pits have made soldiers sick and how the Department of Defense and the VA are doing little to help them.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

U.N. General Assembly Dynamics

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs magazine and author of the book How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle, discusses President Obama's address at the U.N. General Assembly and the dynamics animating this year's gathering.

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The Takeaway

The Syrian Opposition & Possible U.S. Intervention

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

As the Obama Administration lobbies Congress to support an American intervention into the Syrian conflict, the Syrian opposition waits with baited breath. Carne Ross is a former British diplomat and the founder of Independent Diplomat, a non-profit diplomatic advisory group that is currently advising the Syrian National Coalition. He discusses the state of the opposition, and the Coalition’s hopes for the future.

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Radiolab

Truth and Cannonballs

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Errol Morris is a legendary fact-hunting documentary sleuth. His film The Thin Blue Line has been credited with overturning a murder conviction, and freeing an accused man from a death sentence. For him, the search for truth shouldn't stop short of insanity. He tells Jad and Robert a story about ...

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Radiolab

Hidden Truths

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Surprising truths hidden in plain sight.

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State of the Re:Union

State of the Re:Union: Stories of Veterans Returning from War

Saturday, July 06, 2013

Broadcast times: Saturday at 6am on 93.9FM, 2pm on AM820. Sunday at 7am and 8pm on AM820.

More than two million veterans have come home so far from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. For returning veterans, reintegrating into society can be a challenge. How do you find your place, when you’ve changed and the people you love don’t recognize you? When that old life is gone and you have to start a new one from scratch. In this hour State of the Re:Union explores reintegration and asks the question: how do you come back home from war?

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Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The "Is Hillary Too Old?" Gabfest

Friday, July 05, 2013

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring David Plotz, John Dickerson and Atlantic senior editor Garance Franke-Ruta. This week: Will the House move on immigration? Is HRC too old to be president? Is Gettysburg the most important battle in U.S. history?

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The Takeaway

Fighting the Real Threat of Killer Robots

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

They may sound like the stuff of campy horror films, but killer robots are a real threat, and an international community of scholars and NGOs is trying to stop them. Mark Bishop, of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, is among them.

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The Takeaway

Author and Veteran Kevin Powers Reflects on Memorial Day

Monday, May 27, 2013

From Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front" to Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried," the combat novel takes its readers right into the action, into the horrors of war. With his recent novel "The Yellow Birds," author and veteran Kevin Powers does for Iraq what Remarque did for World War I and O'Brien did for Vietnam. On this Memorial Day, Powers reflects on his fellow veterans, and the military personnel still serving today.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Justice Sotomayor; Against Landmines; Primates and Humanism

Monday, May 27, 2013

We’re airing some of our favorite recent segments on this Memorial Day. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor talks about growing up in the Bronx and her path to the highest court. Then, we hear listeners respond to two questions inspired by Justice Sotomayor’s interview: first, is law school worth it? And who inspired you to see the world differently? Plus, Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams on her activism against landmines; primatologist Frans de Waal on what animals can teach us about innate morality and therefore about religion; and a discussion about the intersection of art and science with performance artist Marina Abramović and two NYU neuroscientists.

The Takeaway

President Obama Seeks to Narrow 'War on Terror'

Friday, May 24, 2013

In the first major counter-terrorism speech of his second term, President Obama outlined guidelines for the use of drone strikes, laid out plans to close Guantanamo and sought to find a way to finally end the war on terror.

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The Takeaway

How Long Will the War on Terror Last?

Monday, May 20, 2013

How long will the war on terror last?  Another five years? Or ten years? That question was put to a senior Pentagon official by Congress last week during hearings by the Senate Armed Services Committee over whether to revise the AUMF, the Authorization to Use Military Force. Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist and author of the book, “The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War,” explains what the AUMF means and why its extension matters.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Washington News; NJ Transit During Sandy; Mammograms; Evil Men

Monday, May 13, 2013

Buzzfeed's Ben Smith discusses the latest news out of Washington. Plus: WNYC's Transportation Nation team discusses New Jersey Transit's performance during Sandy; a new vision for Madison Square Garden and Penn Station; an explanation of the different kinds of mammograms; war crimes and the evil men who perpetrate them; and How to Be a Grown A$$ Woman with Jezebel's Lindy West.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Reimagining American Influence in the Middle East

Monday, April 29, 2013

David Rohde looks at the evolving nature of war and argues that a dysfunctional Washington squandered billions on contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan, neglected its true allies in the war on terror, and failed to employ important nonmilitary weapons in the war on terror. His new book Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence in the Middle East surveys post-Arab Spring Tunisia, Turkey, and Egypt, and finds a yearning for American technology, trade, and education, and says only Muslim moderates can eradicate militancy.

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On The Media

Covering the Veteran Beat

Friday, April 26, 2013

NPR's Quil Lawrence spent a decade in Iraq and Afghanistan as a war correspondent. But now, he's covering a new beat - veterans from those wars as they transition back to civilian life. Bob talks to Quil about challenging his own assumptions and the conventional wisdom on the veteran beat.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Wall Street Manipulation, Chuck Close, Jessica Soffer's Novel, Jeremy Scahill on Covert War

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi talks about whether bankers and brokers manipulated the market rates that affect global borrowing costs. Chuck Close describes the process of using large-scale Polaroid photographs to create his paintings. Jessica Soffer discusses her novel called Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots. The Nation’s Jeremy Scahill talks about America’s covert wars and the elite soldiers who operate in more than 100 countries around the world.

The Takeaway

The Social and Economic Costs of a Lockdown

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Last Friday, the city of Boston and its surrounding areas were put on lockdown as authorities searched for the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. The subways no longer ran, residents were asked to stay inside, and 9000 police, military and swat personnel descended on the city. In the end, the suspect was apprehended, but what were the costs - psychologically and economically - to Boston and the nation? And were those costs worth it?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle for Afghanistan: 19th Century and Now

Monday, April 22, 2013

Award-winning historian, journalist, and travel writer William Dalrymple talks about the spectacular first battle for Afghanistan: the British invasion of the remote kingdom in 1839, and argues that it’s an important parable of neocolonial ambition, folly, and hubris that has striking relevance to our own time. Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan: 1839-42 illuminates the uncanny similarities between the West’s first disastrous entanglement with Afghanistan and the situation today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Times of TIm Hetherington

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Sebastian Junger talks about directing the documentary “Which Way is the Front Line from Here: The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington,” a portrait of the war photographer who in April 2011 was killed by mortar fire in Misrata, Libya, where he’d been covering the civil war. Junger is joined by James Brabazon, a war photographer who is featured in the documentary, and who was a friend of Hetherington. The film debuts April 18 on HBO, in conjunction with “Sleeping Soliders,” an outdoor exhibition of  Hetherington’s work at The International Center of Photography.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Is war with North Korea imminent?

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Is war with North Korea imminent?

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