Streams

 

War

The Leonard Lopate Show

Churchill's First War

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

An account of Winston Churchill's early military career fighting in the 1890 Afghan campaign offers revealing parallels into today's war in Afghanistan.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Seriously Not All Right

Monday, May 12, 2014

A senior military intelligence officer and Foreign Service officer for the U.S. Department of State developed PTSD after witnessing war crimes adn genocide around the world.

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The Takeaway

Deaths of 40 Vets Spark Calls for VA Reform

Friday, May 09, 2014

According to Congressional officials, as many as 40 veterans died waiting for care at a VA medical center in Phoenix. Many are calling for VA Secretary Eric Shinseki to resign, but not everyone in D.C. believe that's the right move.

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America Abroad

America Abroad: The Consequences of Shrinking America's Military

Friday, May 09, 2014

The Pentagon has announced plans to shrink the U.S. military to pre-World War II levels following the end of the war in Iraq and the continued withdrawal from Afghanistan. On this edition of America Abroad, hear reactions to a smaller U.S. military from allies in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East about whether America's ability to advance its interests is compromised.

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The Takeaway

Draft Draws Young Ukrainian Home to Fight

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

The question of whether or not he would fight for his country, even die for his country, has real weight for 24-year-old Ukrainian Yuriy Didula, now that Ukraine has reinstated the draft.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America’s Shadow Wars

Monday, May 05, 2014

Deniable covert operations are not new—they’ve been ordered by every president and every administration since the World War II. In many instances covert operations have relied on surrogates, with American personnel involved only at a distance, insulated by layers of deniability. Larry Hancock and Stuart Wexler trace the evolution of these covert operations from the Truman era through the Obama Administration. Their book Shadow Warfare: The History of America’s Undeclared Wars also explores relationship between the CIA and the military.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Struggle: Covert War, Minimum Wage, Isolation and Exile

Monday, May 05, 2014

On today’s show: We’ll look into the history of covert operations, stretching all the way back to the Truman Administration. George Prochnik traces the life of Stefan Zweig, and tells us why this major literary star of the 1930s killed himself in 1942. Our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America series continues with former Labor Secretary Robert Reich on the economics of being poor and whether raising the minimum wage can actually help workers get out of poverty. And Mona Simpson talks about her latest novel, Casebook.

Freakonomics Radio

Which Came First, the Chicken or the Avocado?

Thursday, April 24, 2014

When it comes to exercising outrage, people tend to be very selective. Could it be that humans are our least favorite animal?

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The Takeaway

Nearly 1,000 Wrongful Deaths in VA System

Thursday, April 03, 2014

In the decade after 9/11, nearly 1,000 veterans became victims of the administration designed to help them. The Department of Veterans Affairs paid more than $200 million in wrongful death claims.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

George Packer and Dexter Filkins on the literature of the Iraq War.

Monday, March 31, 2014

George Packer and Dexter Filkins on the literature of the Iraq War.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tributes: Jonathan Schell

Friday, March 28, 2014

Jonathan Schell spent a lifetime exploring war in all its various incarnations.  His 1982 book, The Fate of the Earth – in which he called for complete nuclear disarmament -- was called “the new Bible of our time, the White Paper of our age,” by Helen Caldicott, president of Physicians for Social Responsibility.  He had been a lead writer at The New Yorker till 1987, a columnist for Newsday and New York Newsday, and, most recently, a correspondent for The Nation.  He died recently at the age of 70. You can hear his interview with Leonard from May 2003, when he spoke about the greatest non-violent moments in modern history, from his book The Unconquerable World.

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Soundcheck

How 'Teenage' Became A Part Of Life

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

This might be hard to imagine, but there was a time -- not too long ago -- when teenagers didn’t exist. Yes, there were people between the ages of 13 and 19. But the term “teenager” didn't enter pop culture until the end of World War II, in 1945. Matt Wolf, director of a new documentary called Teenage, joins us to talk about how the term and the concept behind it came about -- and the role that music played in its worldwide spread.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Redeployment: Stories about Soldiers

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Iraq war veteran Phil Klay describes the frontlines of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, asking us to understand what happened there, and what happened to the soldiers who returned. His book of short stories, Redeployment, is interwoven with themes of brutality and faith, guilt and fear, helplessness and survival, the characters in these stories struggle to make meaning out of chaos.

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The New Yorker: Political Scene

Patrick Radden Keefe and William Finnegan on the arrest of El Chapo and the drug war.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Patrick Radden Keefe and William Finnegan on the arrest of El Chapo and the drug war.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

McChrystal: "I Would Not Oppose Re-Instituting the Draft"

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Saying that the US armed forces should reflect the US population, General Stanley McChrystal, former commander of U.S. Forces in Afghanistan, offered support for the idea of re-instating the draft on the Brian Lehrer Show. He also discussed the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, even agreeing that the invasion of Iraq may have been one of the biggest foreign policy mistakes in U.S. history.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Bosnia List

Monday, February 24, 2014

Kenan Trebincevic discusses how his happy childhood was totally transformed once the civil war began in 1992 – and returning to Bosnia 20 years later. His memoir is called The Bosnia List.

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The Takeaway

War on Film: Bridging The Civilian-Military Divide

Monday, January 13, 2014

On and off film, war isn't what it used to be. Nowadays, it seems like war films may represent a dual yearning to revisit combat experiences by those who served, and a desire to better understand conflicts by those who haven't. Award winning film author and lecturer Robert McKee has done extensive research on the depiction of war in the movies. He discusses how public sentiment and the kinds of wars we fight have changed what we see on the screen, and how the box office performs. 

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The Takeaway

Iraq War Vets Reflect as Al Qaeda Rebounds

Monday, January 13, 2014

Al Qaeda flags now fly over Fallujah and Ramadi, two of the major conflict zones for American troops throughout the Iraq War. For U.S. veterans who fought in the region, that news is hard to hear. Marine Michael Zacchea suffered severe injuries in a fire-fight in 2004 during what is known as the second battle of Fallujah. Benjamin Busch served two combat tours in Iraq as a Marine Corps infantry officer. David Retske is a former UAV pilot who served in Iraq from 2004 to 2005. Together they reflect on Al Qaeda's resurgence. 

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The tug of war over the future of Ukraine

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The tug of war over the future of Ukraine

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WNYC News

Over 150 Years of Wars, in Photos

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Photos that capture war from the point of view of observers, civilians and soldiers over the last 165 years in 28 nations are on display at a new exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum.

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