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War

The Takeaway

Iraq: The Dangers of Drawdown

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Monday was the deadliest day for U.S. troops in Iraq in months as an insurgent attack killed five U.S. soldiers stationed in Baghdad. The country is still a dangerous place to be even as the United States prepares to begin the final withdrawal of American troops from the country. "There are people out there who are trying to kill you," says John Kamin, who was in the Army when he was deployed iwht the Louisiana National Guard in March, 2010. He says "to me it's reminiscent of the earlier days in the war." Kamin is a member and spokesman of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

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The Takeaway

US to Hire 5,000 Contractors to Protect Americans in Iraq

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Almost 50 thousand U.S. troops remain in Iraq who are supposed to be out of the country by the end of the year. However, Iraq remains a very a dangerous place and The State Department announced that it will  hire over 5,000 private security contractors to fill the void and protect military hardware and diplomats who will remain in the country. Reporter for The Wall Street Journal, Nathan Hodge says there's more than one way you can solve this problem. One way, of course, is not to be in the country. Another is to use the State Department's diplomatic security service, but it is not nearly big enough for this situation.

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The Takeaway

Can Troops Really Leave Afghanistan in July?

Monday, June 06, 2011

The troop drawdown in Afghanistan is scheduled to begin in July, but we don't yet know how many will be taken out of the country. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said that a slower drawdown is needed when he spoke from Afghanistan on his farewell visit to troops before his retirement. David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times analyzes the situation. He says we haven't yet heard from the new Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta. It is likely, says Sanger, that President Obama do what he did in Iraq, essentially setting a date for the ultimate drawdown and leave the pace of the withdrawal up to the commanders. 

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The Takeaway

Cyberwar's Rules of Engagement

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

The laws of war dictate that a foreign attack on American soil can be met with military retaliation. But what if that attack is comes in the form of a computer virus? The Pentagon has determined that a computer sabotage coming from another country can constitute an act of war, which opens the door for the U.S. to respond using traditional military force. Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege, Jr. explains what this means for military strategy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Oscar Nominated Documentaries: "Restrepo"

Monday, May 30, 2011

Sebastian Junger, filmmaker/journalist and author of WAR, and filmmaker/photographer Tim Hetherington, discuss their film about the war in Afghanistan, "Restrepo."

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The Takeaway

Memorial Day with Veterans and their Families

Monday, May 30, 2011

For millions of Americans, Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of the Summer. It's a time for backyard barbecues, town parades and family getaways. However, for the men women and families of those who killed serving their country, Memorial Day weekend resonates more deeply. William Brown is a former Navy Seal and currently a law student at Rutgers.  Mary Galeti is the wife of First Lieutenant Russell Galeti of the National Guard.

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The Takeaway

Memorial Day, Remembered by Military Widows

Monday, May 30, 2011

It's become a tradition here at The Takeaway to speak with veterans about who they're remembering on Memorial Day. Taryn Davis's husband Michael was a soldier serving in Iraq. He was killed in Baghdad in May 2007, when Taryn was just 21 years old. Taryn is the founder of the American Widow Project. Also with us is LaNita Herlem. Her husband was also killed in Iraq, in April 2006.

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The Takeaway

Who Will You Remember on Memorial Day, and How?

Friday, May 27, 2011

Memorial Day is a holiday — we break out the grill, head to the beach, pack a picnic. But many people around the country are also focused on the holiday's genesis: honoring our men and women in uniform. This weekend some will throw parties for loved ones; others will visit graves of the deceased who served or gave the ultimate sacrifice. Still others will be visiting war memorials around the country. 

We've been asking you: Who are you honoring this weekend, and how are you going about it? You've given us some powerful responses. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Food, Love, and War

Friday, May 27, 2011

Annia Ciezadlo gives an account of civilian life during wartime. She spent six years living in Baghdad and Beirut, where she broke bread with Shiites and Sunnis, warlords and refugees, matriarchs and mullahs. Day of Honey: A Memoir of Food, Love, and War is about the hunger for food and friendship in times of war, and she writes about food and the rituals of eating to show a side of the Middle East that most Americans never see.

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The Takeaway

As Airstrikes on Libya Continue, Lessons in History

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

NATO increased airstrikes on Libya Wednesday morning, bombarding Gadhafi forces with the heaviest assault since the air campaign started over two-months ago. However, Col. Moammar Gadhafi does not seem any closer to relinquishing power than he did two months ago. What is NATO doing wrong? Robert Haddick, managing editor of Small Wars Journal, says NATO will look to past successful campaigns, such as Kosovo, and try to implement that success to Libya. Haddick explains that there is an element of coercion and pressure implicit in these attacks aimed at getting Gadhafi's leadership to crack.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Eliminating the Use of Child Soldiers

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

As the leader of the United Nations peacekeeping force in Rwanda in 1994, Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire came face-to-face with child soldiers during the genocide there. Since then, the use of child soldiers has proliferated in conflicts around the world: they are cheap, plentiful, expendable, and loyal. In They Fight Like Soldiers, They Die Like Children: The Global Quest to Eradicate the Use of Child Soldiers, Dallaire looks at how the use of child soldiers can be eliminated.

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The Takeaway

Chaos for Civilians in War-Torn Libya

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Most of the news out of Libya focuses on the battle between Moammar Gadhafi’s security forces and the Libyan rebels. But what about the civilians, the foreign aid workers and the journalists who have to live with the chaos war leaves behind? James Foley is a freelance journalist reporting from Libya. He was captured by Libyan security forces in April and has been detained in Brega ever since. His mother Diane Foley joins us to talk about her son’s detention and the turmoil in Libya.

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WNYC News

Bin Laden Son Who Rejects Violence Condemns Father's 'Arbitrary Killing'

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

His father should have been "arrested and tried in a court of law so that truth is revealed to the people of the world," Omar bin Laden says in a statement sent to The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Will Drones in Libya Help Overthrow Gadhafi?

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Armed drones will soon fly in Libya in order to help enforce the no-fly zone in place there, the White House announced last week. Drones have been a controversial military weapon over the past few years, and a new study by the British Defense Ministry, believes new technologies, such as drones, may mean we resort to military conflict much sooner and easier than before. Are drones really a useful tool in military conflict or do they just serve to escalate the situation? 

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The Takeaway

Remembering Photojournalists Killed in Misrata

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Tim Hetherington, Oscar-nominated director of the 2010 documentary, “Restrepo” and photojournalist Chris Hondros were killed yesterday in Misrata, Libya. They, along with other war photographers, were caught in the middle of heavy fire between rebels and government forces. Two other photographers were also injured but are in stable condition. The Takeaway had a chance to speak with another photographer in Misrata, Andre Liohn, who had been at the scene of the shelling only a few hours prior to the attack. Andre was the first to report the deaths.

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Studio 360

Soldiers Protecting Art, Art Protecting Soldiers

Monday, April 18, 2011

A recently discovered audio recording of a 1946 speech by then-General Dwight D. Eisenhower reminds us that "they who have dwelt with death will be among the most ardent worshipers of life and beauty and of the peace in which these can thrive."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Afghanistan War on Film

Friday, April 15, 2011

Janus Metz, director of the film "Armadillo", discusses his film and the challenge of capturing this war on film.

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The Takeaway

Woman Among Warlords: Afghan Activist Malalai Joya

Friday, April 15, 2011

In 2005, at the age of 27, Malalai Joya became the youngest person ever elected to Afghanistan's National Assembly. In 2007, she was booted from the Parliament after publicly criticizing Afghan warlords. Now, Joya is an activist for women and democracy, and she remains a fierce critic of both Hamid Karzai's government and the presence of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan. Joya shares her story and explains why she has been called "the bravest woman in Afghanistan." 

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The Takeaway

When Fighters Become Humanitarians

Thursday, April 14, 2011

We often look at the soldiers we send off to battle as warriors. But the experience of war transforms can transform fighters into humanitarians; we hear from two young veterans for whom this is the case. U.S. Marine Rye Barcott is an Iraq veteran, and founder of Carolina for Kibera: a non-governmental organization that uses sports and health care to nurture and develop young leaders in the slums of Kenya. He’s also the author of “It Happened on the Way to War: A Marine’s Path to Peace.” Eric Greitens is a Navy SEAL, Iraq veteran, Rhodes Scholar, and founder of The Mission Continues: a non-profit that trains wounded veterans for leadership roles in their communities. He’s also the author of “The Heart and the Fist: The Education of a Humanitarian, the Making of a Navy Seal.”

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The Takeaway

Perennial Budget Cut Survivor: The Defense Department

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

The budget remains the hot button issue in Washington, and cuts all across the board appear likely, except for defense. Military spending makes up approximately 20 percent of the federal budget, and will likely exceed $700 billion in 2011 — that's 40 percent of the world's total military spending. Where does all that money go to? Larry Korb, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense under the Reagan administration explains.

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