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Wall Street

The Takeaway

Oil Prices Spike Amid Turmoil in Egypt

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Oil prices have been floating around $90 a barrel for weeks, but now, the turmoil in Egypt has pushed the price up. Crude oil jumped close to 4% on Friday and then 3.2% yesterday to settle at $92.19 a barrel. However, the output of crude hasn’t changed in the region, so what exactly explains the sharp rise in prices?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Financial Crisis Commission: What We've Learned

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Charles Herman, WNYC business and economics editor, has been monitoring the press conference and report from the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission this morning - he offers his highlights.

→ Read A Primer on the Findings, Watch Live Video of the Panel, And Add Your Thoughts at It's A Free Country

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Financial Comission Reports Back

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Joe NoceraNew York Times business columnist and author of the Executive Suite blog, previews the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission press conference taking place this morning.

→ Read A Primer on the Findings, Watch Live Video of the Panel, And Add Your Thoughts at It's A Free Country

WNYC News

Wall Street Won't Be Hurt By Reform Bill, Says Bloomberg Official

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

A Bloomberg administration official said sweeping new financial regulations being written in Washington, D.C., will not harm Wall Street.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Derivatives All Grown Up, Morning Headlines

Monday, December 13, 2010

Derivatives have long been a part of the financial system, but they aren't what they used to be — and they're a lot more complicated.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Is Wall Street Worthy?

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

John Cassidy, staff writer at The New Yorker, discusses his recent article "What Good is Wall Street", which argues that the work investment bankers do today is socially worthless.

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The Takeaway

British Government to Keep Closer Tabs on Investment Banking Firms

Friday, November 12, 2010

Yesterday, Britain’s government announced a plan to more closely monitor its financial services firms, including large investment banking companies. Their financial watchdog arm, called the Financial Services Authority, is going to start recording the cell phone conversations of investment bankers to try and cut down on fraud and insider trading.

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WNYC News

New Figures Show the Strength of Wall Street's Rebound

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Tuesday that between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the average weekly wage in Manhattan rose 12 percent. In comparison, across the nation the average weekly wage increased less than one percent. The figures include end-of-year bonuses, which big banks typically pay out in the first part of the calendar year.

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The Takeaway

One More Time Around on Financial Reform?

Friday, November 05, 2010

Now that the midterm elections are over, the shakeup in Congressional committees are about to begin. Republicans have made it clear that when they take control of the House this January, they'll be targeting several key pieces of President Obama's agenda to roll back. A number of Republicans ran on repealing the president's health care reform legislation, but far fewer of them have talked about their desire to repeal the sweeping financial regulation bill passed earlier this year. Louise Story, business and finance reporter for The New York Times, explains what this means for President Obama and consumers.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Dodd, Frankly

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Christopher Dodd, retiring United States Senator (D-CT), talks about the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and the race to replace him in the Senate.

»» Join The Conversation At It's A Free Country

The Brian Lehrer Show

James Wolfensohn: A Global Life

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Former president of the World Bank James D. Wolfensohn discusses his life and work, and his new book A Global Life: My Journey Among Rich and Poor, from Sydney to Wall Street to the World Bank.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Context and a Movie: "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps"

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

Dana Stevens, film critic for Slate.com and co-host of their Culture Gabfest, discusses the film "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps," the sequel to the "greed is good" original. Also, Joe NoceraNew York Times business columnist and author of their Executive Suite blog, offers his take on "Wall Street," the movie vs. Wall Street, the reality.

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The Takeaway

Should the Government Have Earned More from TARP?

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Under the unpopular bank bailout program, the Troubled Asset Relief Program, better known as TARP, the government invested money in struggling banks, and eventually got something in return. But the program's end got Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for our partner The New York Times, thinking about whether the big banks got a better deal than the government did, when everything was said and done.

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The Takeaway

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps ... or Does It?

Friday, September 24, 2010

Today, one of the greatest screen villains of the past quarter century returns in “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.”

This time, Gordon Gekko, again played by Michael Douglas, returns to the investment banking world just in time to see it crash and burn ... and of course, in time to benefit from it crashing and burning.

But while some fans of Gekko and "Wall Street" are thrilled with the prospect of a sequel, we’re more interested in knowing whether the movie is good, the facts accurate, and what we might learn from it.

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The Takeaway

Corporate Directors Dodge Scrutiny After Companies Collapse

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Two years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, its directors remain in high demand in corporate America.  In fact, rather than face the public outrage and scrutiny that marred the reputations of their CEOs, sitting board members of many of Wall Streets' troubled firms, including AIG, Bear Stearns and Wachovia, still play an active role in the daily operations of corporate America.

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The Takeaway

Does Income Inequality Lead to Financial Crisis?

Friday, August 27, 2010

There's long been a growing gap between the rich and the poor in the United States, but some believe that disparity could actually cause more harm than previously thought. A group of economists, sociologists, and legal scholars are saying there may be a correlation between income inequality and financial crises. One possible link between the two, according to David A. Moss, an economic and policy historian at the Harvard Business School could be the fact that Wall Street titans wield power that, in turn, allows them to promote policies which benefit them, but not necessarily the financial system as a whole.

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The Takeaway

End Credits Bring Seriousness to Ferrell Farce

Friday, August 13, 2010

The new Will Ferrell comedy “The Other Guys” is the top grossing movie in theaters right now, but it’s the movie credits that are getting an extraordinary bout of attention.

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The Takeaway

Grim Numbers Do Not Bode Well for Economic Outlook

Friday, August 13, 2010

With Wall Street indexes down for a third straight day yesterday and poor economic reports in recent weeks, the outlook for global economies does not look bright.

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Azi Paybarah

Dems Hit Lazio as a 'Bonus Baby'

Friday, July 30, 2010

WNYC

Here’s the New York State Democratic Party’s latest video, dubbing Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Lazio “a Bonus Baby,” for getting $1.3 million from JP Morgan, which received federal aid during the Wall Street meltdown.

The ad, it’s worth noting, is not coming directly from Democratic gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo’s campaign, but it’s clear the way they want to handle Lazio is by tying him personally to Wall Street, bonuses and bailouts.

The goal is force Lazio into defending Wall Street, which isn't too common right now, as this front-page Washington Post story about Democratic congressional candidate Reshma Saujani makes clear.

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The Takeaway

Citi Settles with SEC for $75 Million

Friday, July 30, 2010

Citigroup has reached a $75 million settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for misleading investors about the extent of its holdings in sub-prime mortgage investments. This follows the SEC's investigation into several banking practices during the financial crisis and their record settlement with Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs.

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