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Vietnam War

The Takeaway

Retracing a Journey From Saigon to San Francisco

Thursday, April 16, 2015

In April 1975, author Andrew Lam fled Saigon for San Francisco. Forty years after the end of the Vietnam War, Lam reflects on his homeland and the formation of his American identity.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Stationed in Saigon, a Bank Manager Saves His Staff

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Former Vice President of Citibank John P. Riordan talks about his role in the rescue of 106 Vietnamese people in the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Burning Dollars and Boarding Helicopters: A Kennedy Revisits Vietnam

Thursday, September 04, 2014

Rory Kennedy discusses her documentary, “Last Days in Vietnam,” a recounting of the 1975 military evacuation of Saigon, with Col. Stuart Herrington, who's featured in the film.

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The Takeaway

Remembering the Vietnam War's 'Lost 74'

Monday, August 04, 2014

In June 1969 during the Vietnam War, an Australian aircraft carrier collided with an American ship in the South China Sea. There were 200 lost that day, including 74 U.S. sailors. But these 74 names have not been included on the Vietnam Memorial.

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The Takeaway

For Many, Iraq's Chaos Hits Too Close To Home

Thursday, June 19, 2014

As Iraq seemingly unravels, how do veterans feel about the situation? Listeners who served in Iraq, along with veterans and visitors to the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, weigh in on America's obligation as Iraq again spirals into chaos.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Adventures and Troubles in Foreign Lands and at Home

Monday, May 26, 2014

On today’s Memorial Day show we're re-airing some favorite interviews from March. Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal, and Sarah Shourd—the three Americans who were captured by Iranian forces while they were hiking and were held for two years—tell us about being in prison and then finally being released. Carl Hoffman explains how he uncovered new evidence about the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in New Guinea in 1961. We’ll look at the diaries of George F. Kennan, who devised the policy of containment during the Cold War. Bruce Dancis talks about becoming an anti-war activist in the 1960s—and going to prison for resisting the draft during Vietnam.

Voices at the New York Public Library

Paul Fussell: The Poetry of Three Wars: World War I, World War II and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The late Paul Fussell (1924-2012) was a noted cultural and literary historian, who taught at Rutgers and the University of Pennsylvania. He wrote about such diverse subjects as Samuel Johnson, travel, and the American class system. His numerous books include Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, The Great War and Modern Memory (for which he won a National Book Award), and The American Infantry in Northwestern Europe, 1944-45. Fussell was a veteran of World War II, fighting in Europe, where he was wounded and decorated with a Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Vietnam Vets Oral History

Monday, June 17, 2013

Philip F. Napoli, assitant professor of history at Brooklyn College and the author of Bringing It All Back Home: An Oral History of New York City's Vietnam Veterans (Hill and Wang, 2013)goes beyond the image of the damaged Vietnam veteran, gathering stories from veterans, many of whom went onto careers in public service.

→ EVENTBook Launch and Author Talk with Philip F. Napioli, Saturday June 22, from 2pm tp 4pm at the Brooklyn Historical Society's Othmer Library. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Syria Intervention; John Liu; Sheila Oliver; Vietnam Veteran Stories

Monday, June 17, 2013

New York Times chief Washington correspondent David Sanger analyzes the next steps in the Syrian war, the Iranian elections and the ongoing strife in Turkey. Plus: City Comptroller John Liu; New Jersey State Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver states her case to be the next New Jersey senator; author and history professor Philip Napoli discusses his new book, Bringing It All Back Home: An Oral History of New York City’s Vietnam Veterans; and Bloomberg View columnist Noah Feldman weighs in on Supreme Court rulings. 

The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: The Iraq War Generation

Friday, March 22, 2013

We're marking the 10th anniversary of the Iraq war by asking for comments from those of you young enough to have your view of war shaped by Iraq (as opposed to Vietnam). What lessons have you drawn about war, the US's role in the world, our leaders, and more? And how do you think it compares to the way your parents (Vietnam) and grandparents (WWII) talk about the lessons of war? Call 212-433-9692 or comment here.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Ms. Bella Abzug

Monday, March 18, 2013

In March, 1972, reporter Eleanor Fischer interviewed Congresswoman Bella Abzug as she was fighting to hold on to her congressional district in Manhattan encompassing, in part, the Battery, the Lower East Side, Little Italy, Chinatown, Greenwich Village and Chelsea. Representative Abzug talks about this effort to marginalize her. She also calls for pulling U.S. troops out of Vietnam, endorses Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm's campaign for the Presidency and (there may be some debate over it) lays claim to starting the honorific "Ms."

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Diplomatic Impunity: Dean Acheson Counsels Audiences on Disarmament

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

WNYC

In 1958, former Secretary of State Dean Acheson was out of power but not out of opinions. At this Book and Authors Luncheon the influential statesman weighs in on the pressing foreign policy question of the day: our relations with the Soviet Union.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tibutes: Stanley Karnow

Monday, January 28, 2013

Stanely Karnow was not only a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, but a foreign correspondent and television documentarian.  His books include Vietnam: A History, Mao and China: From Revolution to Revolution, and the memoir, Paris in the Fifties -- which prompted his friend, Bernard Kalb, the former CBS reporter, to recall, "Stanley has a great line about how being a journalist is like being an adolescent all your life."  You can hear him speak with Leonard as part of a panel discussion about the accuracy of historical movies from November 1995.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The American War in Vietnam

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Journalist and historian Nick Turse talks about the American war on Vietnamese civilians. His book Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam is based on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews, and reveals that official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Foreign Correspondent David Halberstam Analyzes Conflict in Vietnam

Friday, October 12, 2012

WNYC

David Halberstam briefs this 1964 meeting of the Overseas Press Club on what he sees as a "sharp conflict" between America's official optimism and the reality experienced by reporters embedded in Vietnam.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Making of America’s Vietnam

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Fredrik Logevall traces the path that led two the United States and France to lose their way in Vietnam. Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam opens in 1919 at the Versailles Peace Conference and concludes in 1959, with a Viet Cong ambush on an outpost outside Saigon and the deaths of two American officers. In between come years of political, military, and diplomatic maneuvering and miscalculation, as leaders on all sides turn an avoidable struggle into a bloody reality.

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The Takeaway

U.S. Begins Agent Orange Cleanup

Thursday, August 09, 2012

During the Vietnam War, the U.S. sprayed millions of gallons of the toxic defoliant known as Agent Orange over jungle areas to destroy enemy cover. Today, the U.S. has begun clean-up project in an effort to build ties between the countries. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Wallace and Westmoreland

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

David Blum, editor of Kindle Singles at Amazon, adjunct professor at Columbia School of Journalism, and author of TICK...TICK...TICK...The Long Life and Turbulent Times of 60 Minutes, talks about the Westmoreland v. CBS case, its affect on Mike Wallace, and history's verdict on the accusations.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: The Things They Carried

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Tim O’Brien’s stirring and poignant tale of foot soldiers in the Vietnam War shapes this entire program.

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The Takeaway

Pentagon Papers Revealed, 40 Years Later

Monday, June 13, 2011

The National Archives and Records Administration releases the Pentagon Papers in full for the first time today. When the papers were leaked by Daniel Ellsberg in 1971, Americans learned the truth behind the U.S.’s involvement in Vietnam for the first time. Exactly 40 years ago, on June 13, 1971, The New York Times published the first in a series of articles based on the Pentagon Papers. The Times' decision to publish the classified documents led to a series of legal battles with the Nixon Administration. The Supreme Court finally decided the case, ruling that under the First Amendment, the Times could freely publish the Pentagon Papers.

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