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Vietnam

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Photographic History of the War in Vietnam

Monday, November 04, 2013

Pete Hamill, reported from Vietnam in 1965, and Hal Buell and Santiago Lyon of the Associated Press discuss how photography tells the story of the war in Vietnam and talk about the new book Vietnam: The Real War, A Photographic History by the Associated Press, and the accompanying exhibition at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York.

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Studio 360

American Icons: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Friday, October 04, 2013

How do you memorialize a war that was more tragic than triumphant? Inscribed with the name of every fallen soldier, Maya Lin’s granite wall became a sacred place for veterans. 

Comments [28]

On Being

Thich Nhat Hanh — Mindfulness, Suffering, and Engaged Buddhism [remix]

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Zen master and poet Thich Nhat Hanh was forcibly exiled from his native country of Vietnam more than 40 years ago. We visited the Buddhist monk at a Christian conference center in a lakeside setting of rural Wisconsin. Here, Thich Nhat Hanh offers stark,

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On Being

[Unedited] Larry Ward with Krista Tippett

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Zen master and poet Thich Nhat Hanh was forcibly exiled from his native country of Vietnam more than 40 years ago. We visited the Buddhist monk at a Christian conference center in a lakeside setting of rural Wisconsin. Here, Thich Nhat Hanh offers stark,

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Thich Nhat Hanh with Krista Tippett

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Zen master and poet Thich Nhat Hanh was forcibly exiled from his native country of Vietnam more than 40 years ago. We visited the Buddhist monk at a Christian conference center in a lakeside setting of rural Wisconsin. Here, Thich Nhat Hanh offers stark,

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Cheri Maples with Krista Tippett

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Zen master and poet Thich Nhat Hanh was forcibly exiled from his native country of Vietnam more than 40 years ago. We visited the Buddhist monk at a Christian conference center in a lakeside setting of rural Wisconsin. Here, Thich Nhat Hanh offers stark,

Comment

The Takeaway

Two Veterans Separated by 30 Years Come to Terms With PTSD

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Years after the Vietnam War, PTSD is now a household term. Mary McGriff is a retired Captain in the United States Air Force. She served at Balad Air Force base in Iraq in 2004. Douglas Howell was a Marine Corpsman in Vietnam in 1966 and 1967. These are two veterans of two very different wars, and they are separated by nearly 30 years. Today they share their experience with PTSD.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Boat People and the Vietnam Exodus

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Carina Hoang, editor of Boat People: Personal Stories from the Vietnamese Exodus 1975-1996, and David Lee and Lala Stein, who are featured in the book, talk about the largest mass migration in modern history, when more than a million people left war-torn Vietnam by boat in search of safety between the years 1975 and 1996. Thousands perished en route. The personal accounts tell of the perilous sea journey, the refugee camps, and the final journey to new adopted homelands.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Finding Your Element; "Hannah Arendt"; "Shadow Dancer"; Vietnamese Migration

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Ken Robinson’s TED talk on finding your passion is the most-watched of all time, and he talks about how to discover what your talents are and how to nourish them. Director Margarethe von Trotta and actor Barbara Sukowa discuss the new biopic “Hannah Arendt.” Director James Marsh and stars Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough talk about their film, “Shadow Dancer,” about a Northern Irish woman who chooses to spy on her own family rather than go to prison. And we’ll look at the largest mass migration in human history—the more than one million people who left Vietnam by boat between 1975 and 1996.

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Whitney Young Provides Depth and Texture to Portrait of Racial Inequality

Friday, February 01, 2013

WNYC

Focused, uncompromising, and yet essentially pragmatic, Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League, answers questions at this 1966 meeting of the Overseas Press Club. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Bomb

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Ward Wilson describes what he calls the five myths about nuclear weapons. Filmmaker Stephen Maing talks about his documentary “High Tech, Low Life,” about two journalists who pursue stories that the official Chinese media doesn’t want to cover. Ann Leary discusses her new comic novel about an alcoholic New England real estate broker and her complicated web of relationships. Plus, Nick Turse on his new history of the Vietnam War and new evidence of the true brutality of the conflict.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The American War in Vietnam

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Journalist and historian Nick Turse talks about the American war on Vietnamese civilians. His book Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam is based on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews, and reveals that official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded.

Comments [18]

On Being

Arnold Eisen — The Spiritual Audacity of Abraham Joshua Heschel [remix]

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Abraham Joshua Heschel insisted that the opposite of good is not evil, it is indifference. Born into an esteemed Hasidic family in Poland in 1907, he was a mystic who wrote transcendent, poetic words about God. At the same time, he marched alongside Marti

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On Being

[Unedited] Arnold Eisen with Krista Tippett

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Abraham Joshua Heschel insisted that the opposite of good is not evil, it is indifference. Born into an esteemed Hasidic family in Poland in 1907, he was a mystic who wrote transcendent, poetic words about God. At the same time, he marched alongside Marti

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Thomas Ricks on Military Leadership

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Thomas Ricks discusses the decline of American military leadership from World War II to Iraq. History has been kind to the American generals of World War II—Marshall, Eisenhower, Patton, and Bradley—and less kind to the generals of the wars that followed. He looks at why in his new book The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today.

Comments [4]

Radiolab

The Fact of the Matter

Monday, September 24, 2012

Getting a firm hold on the truth is never as simple as nailing down the facts of a situation. This hour, we go after a series of seemingly simple facts -- facts that offer surprising insight, facts that inspire deeply different stories, and facts that, in the end, might not matter at all.

Comments [229]

The Takeaway

The Making of America's Vietnam

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

For the United States, the Vietnam War has long been embroiled in debate and analysis, propagated by the war’s three-decade duration, disputed status, and tremendous toll on human life. In a new book on the war, historian Frederik Logevall takes a look at the period of history preceding American involvement to better understand the making of America's Vietnam.

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The Takeaway

U.S. Begins Agent Orange Cleanup

Thursday, August 09, 2012

During the Vietnam War, the U.S. sprayed millions of gallons of the toxic defoliant known as Agent Orange over jungle areas to destroy enemy cover. Today, the U.S. has begun clean-up project in an effort to build ties between the countries. 

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Radiolab

The Perfect Yellow

Monday, May 21, 2012

Jad and Robert wonder if maybe they could add to their color palette. Jay Neitz wondered the same thing, sort of. Take a monkey that can't see red, for example. Couldn't you just give them the red cones they were missing? So he took the human gene for red cones, ...

Comments [49]

The Takeaway

Hmong Vets of the Vietnam War Seek Military Burial Rights

Monday, March 05, 2012

When we talk about the Vietnam War, we often talk about the draft, protestors, a no-win situation, and veterans’ rights. But something we don’t always give attention to is this question: Who or what is a Vietnam vet? It’s a question that’s haunted thousands of Hmong-Americans, who were trained, armed and paid by the CIA to fight for the U.S. in Vietnam. These soldiers, who hail primarily from Laos, consider themselves vets. But the law prevents them from being buried in national or state veterans’ cemeteries.

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