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Verizon

WNYC News

Manhattan Borough President Pressures Verizon to Return School Funds

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

WNYC

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer called on Verizon to return $800,000 it promised to repay to the city's Department of Education back in April, after an investigation revealed that a contractor had defrauded the schools by jacking up the costs of technology upgrades.

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WNYC News

Protesting Verizon Workers Upset Nearby Residents, Businesses

Thursday, August 18, 2011

As Verizon and the unions representing its employees clash over a new contract, some New Yorkers are suffering collateral damage.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Verizon Strike Turns Bitter

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Steven Greenhouse, New York Times labor and workplace correspondent and author of The Big Squeeze: Tough Times for the American Worker, discusses the increasingly bitter national strike against Verizon, which began on August 7.

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WNYC News

Slow Progress in Verizon Strike as Both Sides Dig In

Monday, August 15, 2011

WNYC

As the Verizon strike continues into its second week, both sides say negotiations toward a new contract are ongoing — albeit at a sluggish pace.

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WNYC News

Verizon, Striking Workers Accuse Each Other of Not Bargaining in Good Faith

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Verizon and picketing workers are accusing each other of not bargaining in good faith, as a strike enters its second week.

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WNYC News

Verizon Workers Hit Picket Lines in City, Along East Coast

Monday, August 08, 2011

Thousands of striking workers from Verizon Communication Inc.'s landline division joined picket lines and rallies Monday at the company's offices from Massachusetts to Virginia, according to a union official.

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The Takeaway

Unions Representing 45,000 Verizon Workers Declare Strike

Monday, August 08, 2011

Two unions that represent workers for Verizon announced an immediate strike on Sunday, demanding better treatment after a lack of progress in negotiating contracts. The Communications Workers of America and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the unions representing Verizon, last went on strike in 2000. Verizon union membership has shrunk by nearly in half since then, and is much weaker than before. Can union members still exert their influence in a strike?

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: U.S. Credit Rating, Obama Bus Tour, Verizon Strike

Monday, August 08, 2011

Credit ratings agency Standard and Poor's downgraded the U.S.'s credit rating for the first time in history on Friday, causing jaws to drop across the country, and raising the blood-pressures of leaders worldwide as many held emergency meetings to fend off any backlash this news might create. President Obama will be preparing this week for his upcoming bus tour to reconnect with voters in the Midwest. Meanwhile, News Corp. will release their fourth quarter results on Wednesday, the PGA Championship kicks off on Thursday, and Dennis Rodman will be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame on Friday.

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WNYC News

Verizon Workers Strike as Contract Talks Break Down

Sunday, August 07, 2011

Thousands of area Verizon workers went on strike on Saturday night as contract negotiations broke down. They are part of a total of 45,000 Verizon workers now on strike across the country.

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WNYC News

How I (Easily) Hacked Into Voice Mail

Monday, July 18, 2011

First, I hacked my own voice mail. Then, when colleagues came around to see, several volunteered their phones, too. The alleged phone hacking at the heart of the scandal at the now-defunct News of the World tabloid can be performed here in the U.S. — and easily.

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WNYC News

Tech Consultant Accused of Stealing $3.6M From Dept of Ed

Thursday, April 28, 2011

A Department of Education consultant illegally billed the city for an extra $3.6 million connecting public schools to the Internet, and then used the money to pay for luxury cars and Long Island real estate, the U.S. attorney's office claims.

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WNYC News

SoJo Tech | Making the Right Call: Verizon v. AT&T on the iPhone

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Countless iPhone and other smartphone users have been waiting for years for this week to arrive. Verizon, which operates the nation's largest wireless network, is finally offering its version of the vaunted iPhone. But, now that the time has come, is it the right move?

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Transportation Nation

Sorry Superman, Can't Change Here: D.C. Metro To Eliminate Phone Booths

Thursday, January 13, 2011

(Washington D.C. - David Schultz, WAMU) D.C.'s Metro announced this morning it will eliminate almost all of the 1,074 pay phones in its train stations.

The reason why shouldn't be surprising to anyone who has ever seen someone who appeared to be talking loudly to themselves but was actually using one of those tiny Bluetooth thingies in their ear: cell phones are pretty prevalent nowadays. It seems like everyone has one. Yes, everyone.

Long, long ago, you had to find a phone booth (and a quarter) to make a phone call. Now, if you have a cell phone, you just have to find something to say - and even that's not always necessary.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: LA's Westside Subway Gets Federal OK, JSK is Compared to Robin Hood, and New Version of OnStar Is Essentially Omnipotent

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

(photo by Dre Batista/Flickr)

Federal officials okay preliminary engineering on LA's Westside subway and light rail line. (Los Angeles Times)

Profiling the grid: Nashville utility planners use research and census data to try to determine who will be buying electric vehicles.  Where should they build substations? In the neighborhoods of female Democrats who live close to work.  (AP via New York Times)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 85% of U.S. adults now wear seat belts. "Only 11 percent wore them in 1982, before the first state law requiring seat belt use."  (NPR)

The Guardian calls NYC Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan "a modern day Robin Hood." And regarding congestion pricing, she says "I do think it's a matter of when, not if."

Two New York City Council members have introduced bills that shrink the no-parking zone on either side of a fire hydrant. (New York Times)

Planned construction on New York's F and G subway lines has been postponed due to the last snowfall. (WNYC)

Brooklyn bicyclists who don't obey the law: the NYPD is coming for you. (Gothamist)

The web war of American Airlines vs. travel sites continues to heat up: now, a company that provides ticket information to travel agents has ended its contract with the airline. (CNN)

A former CEO of Amtrak is the latest addition to the board of DC's Metro. (WAMU)

This could be Ray LaHood's worst nightmare: at the Consumer Electronics Show, General Motors and Verizon unveiled a new version of OnStar. Among its features: Exterior cameras that can detect and record hit-and-runs, and then send the video to the car's owner via a secure server. The ability to watch what's going on in and around the car using a smartphone or home computer. Access to social websites such as YouTube, Twitter and Wikipedia using voice commands. Video chatting via Skype through a dashboard-mounted video display. Remote-controlled home appliance and energy use using an application accessible through the car's video console. Live video images from traffic cameras, to view in real-time congestion. (Detroit News)

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Net Neutrality Threatened?

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Siva Vaidhyanathan, associate professor of media studies and law at the University of Virginia and msnbc.com contributor, talks about the relationship between Google and Verizon and possible threats to net neutrality.

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The Takeaway

Google and Verizon Discuss 'Net Neutrality'

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Earlier this week, The New York Times discovered that Google and Verizon were working on a backdoor deal which, as many online activists worried, would threaten the future of “net neutrality.” In essence, “net neutrality” means that the Internet carries traffic as quickly as it can, regardless of the source. If this neutrality were to end, particular websites could pay ISPs to carry their traffic faster than their competitors.

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The Takeaway

Internet Giants Allegedly Fighting Net Neutrality

Monday, August 09, 2010

In theory, the Internet provides a level playing field for businesses and consumers alike. That’s because, since its creation, the Internet has been built around the principle of “net neutrality”: all traffic online travels as quickly as it can, given the technology and congestion it encounters along the way.  According to an article published by our partner The New York Times, however, a backdoor deal may be nearing between Google and Verizon, which could give a speed advantage to those websites who are willing to pay more.

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