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Urban Planning

To the Best of Our Knowledge

Stories from Cabrini Green

Sunday, April 26, 2015

When the last of the infamous Chicago Public Housing buildings were demolished Audrey Petty asked herself a few questions, “Where did everybody go?” And, “what are their memories?”

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Meat Houses. Yes, Houses Made Out of Meat

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Mitchell Joaquim and the Terreform 1 team are looking for new, organic ways of building homes… and cities. About 4 billion of us live in cities right now. Predictions are, by the end of this century, that number will be closer to 8 billion. That means, for the foreseeable future, we need to build the equivalent of a city of one million people EVERY WEEK... How?

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

On Our Minds: The New High Line

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Have you been to the High Line yet? It’s one of Manhattan's newest parks. In the summer, it's full of sunbathers, lush plantings and strolling locals. It’s also about 30 feet above the ground, built on the bed of an old elevated train line. Writer Annik LaFarge talks about the park, five years into its reinvention.

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99% Invisible

133- Port of Dallas

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Dallas is 300 miles from the ocean. For most of its history, it wanted to be a sea port. Here's how a city moved its river in pursuit of that dream.

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Transportation Nation

Popularity of Morning Walks May Shape the Pedestrian Streetscape of Central Florida

Friday, May 31, 2013

WMFE

What started as a mayor's morning walk for a healthier staff and community is expanding into a renewed dialogue about pedestrians in Central Florida. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Funding Public Services Through Real Estate Development

Friday, March 29, 2013

Julia Vitullo-Martin, director of the Center for Urban Innovation at the Regional Plan Association and Tom Angotti, director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and development, discuss the tactic of funding public housing projects, libraries, schools and post offices through developing real estate.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

'The Artistic and the Beautiful': Frank Lloyd Wright's Wide-Ranging Views

Monday, February 25, 2013

WNYC

In 1957, two years before his death, Frank Lloyd Wright sat down with WNYC to discuss his design philosophy, exhibiting his trademark eloquence and blistering opinions. The year of this interview marks an explosion of commissions for Wright, who by then had been practicing architecture for 70 years.

+ More from WNYC's Archives

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

The Decline of American Cities: Lewis Mumford's 'The City in History'

Friday, November 23, 2012

WNYC

"Like a stopped clock," the author Lewis Mumford asserts in this 1961 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, he has been exactly right twice.  

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

A Conflicted Portrait of Robert Moses,'The Builder for Democracy'

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

WNYC

"I'm not an author. I'm merely a victim" is the unwittingly prescient opening statement from Robert Moses at this 1952 Books and Authors Luncheon. 

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Jane Jacobs Defends Urbanism in 1960s New York City Planning

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

WNYC

Jane Jacobs, in this 1962 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, explains her current role as a community leader in the fight against what she views as the excesses and excrescences of the arrogant Modernist redesign of city neighborhoods.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Infrastructure and The Obama Jobs Speech

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Politico.com's Senior Politics reporter Ben Smith looks at the politics behind the policy and timing of President Obama's jobs speech next week. And Petra Todorovich, director of America 2050, an initiative to develop an infrastructure and growth strategy for the United States, discusses the transportation bills the president is urging Congress to pass and their impact on the NYC area.

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The Takeaway

Detroit: Reinventing the Smaller City

Thursday, March 24, 2011

According to the most recent Census data, the city of Detroit lost over 237,000 people over the past decade. Today, the Motor City has a population of only 713,777, making Detroit America’s 18th most populated city. The Census findings fit nicely into the narrative of Detroit as a modern-day ghost town. However, say argue that the city's blight is also an opportunity to build a new urban environment with opportunities to create a new local economy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Science of Cities

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Theoretical physicists and professors at the Santa Fe Institute, Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt, discuss their attempt to come up with the universal laws governing all cities and city life everywhere. 

Listeners: What laws do you think govern city life? Comment here!

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The Takeaway

Living Cities Aims to Stretch Philanthropic Dollars

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Later today, a philanthropic collaborative called Living Cities will announce $80 million in grants, loans and investments that it will split among five cities: Baltimore, Cleveland, Detroit, Newark, and Minneapolis-St. Paul. Considering the size of major American city budgets, an average of $15 million isn't actually a ton of money, considering some of the systemic problems facing each of those cities. Living Cities hopes to use the cash as seed money, aiming to to stimulate self-sustaining urban renewal projects that will help each area for years to come.  

So has Living Cities found a way to get the most ameliorative bang for their philanthropic buck?

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The Takeaway

Traffic Jams and China's 60-Mile, 11-Day Gridlock

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

For nearly two weeks, a stretch of highway outside Beijing saw monster gridlock, which stretched out over sixty miles and trapped drivers on China's National Highway 110 for days. It had been expected to last until mid-September, but last Thursday, after eleven days, the traffic jam suddenly broke.

Many people, of course, are wondering: Where did it go? How did it start? And could this kind of jam happen again?

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The Takeaway

The Changing Face of Suburbia

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Despite the bad rap that suburbs often get for being dull and sterile, more than half of Americans live there. As more people move to the suburbs, the demographics are changing. Urbanization, density, crime, and immigration are now defining factors of the 'burbs. We're joined by Robert Puentes, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy Program, and Larry Levy, executive director of the National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University.  And we want to hear from you! What do you see as the good parts of the suburbs?»

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The Takeaway

Richard Florida on America's 'Great Reset'

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Even though many economists are proclaiming the "Great Recession" ending or over, the nearly 10 percent of Americans who are unemployed probably find it difficult to imagine exactly what a prosperous, post-recession America will look like. Richard Florida, author of "The Great Reset: How New Ways of Living and Working Drive Post-Crash Prosperity," says that's because the crash has fundamentally altered how we feel about spending and saving. He says we're all in the process of resetting the way we work and live.

We started the conversation by asking the question: Have you remade your life because of this recession?

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The Takeaway

American Cities Adapt to Shrinking Populations

Monday, March 15, 2010

Across America, dozens of towns have seen their populations shrink in the past few years. For cities like Detroit or Cleveland, the demographic decline started well before the economic downturn. For others, like Las Vegas, it’s a brand-new phenomenon. Local governments are trying to adjust to the new reality, and some of them are choosing to downsize. The Kansas City Board of Education voted last Wednesday to shut down nearly half its schools due to dwindling enrollment. And last week, Detroit's mayor announced that the city will demolish thousands of its vacant homes.

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The Takeaway

As Rescue Efforts in Haiti Wind Down, the Rebuilding Challenge Just Begins

Monday, January 25, 2010

It's been almost two weeks since the 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti and the government has formally called an end to the search and rescue efforts. The focus of relief will soon shift from treating the wounded survivors to embarking on the long slog of rebuilding a collapsed city. We get an update on the overall situation there and then we examine how other cities dealt with reconstruction challenges after a disaster like this.

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The Takeaway

Suburbia: American Dream or Nightmare?

Friday, June 12, 2009

When you think about the American suburb, do you see a pretty place with nice houses and neat lawns, or a dead end where you have to drive 20 minutes just for a quart of milk? Are suburbs the American dream or nightmare? Let us know.

What's your take? Leave a comment or record your story at 1-877-8-MY-TAKE.

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