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Storycorps

StoryCorps 416: Mr. McQueen Goes to Washington

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Just a few years ago, 18-year-old Noah McQueen was in trouble with the law, but today he is part of My Brother's Keeper, a White House initiative for young men of color. Noah recently had the chance to record a StoryCorps interview with President Barack Obama, who wanted to know more about Noah's life.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Consequences of the US-Cuba rapprochement

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Consequences of the US-Cuba rapprochement

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The Brian Lehrer Show

When Politics Divide, Can Culture Unite?

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Facebook data say political leanings influence what culture we like. Tell us what cultural touchstones you can actually agree on with friends and relatives across the political aisle.

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 388: Rocket Man

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Alton Yates tells his daughter, Toni, about being part of a small group of Air Force volunteers who tested the effects of high speeds on the body, and helped prove that space travel was safe for humans.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The international crisis over Ukraine

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

The international crisis over Ukraine

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Prospects for peace in Syria

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Prospects for peace in Syria

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WNYC News

Report: Nursing Home Shift Needs More Oversight

Sunday, October 20, 2013

A new report raises questions about managed care companies using poor performing nursing homes in their networks.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Is Obama becoming a lame duck?

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Is Obama becoming a lame duck?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The Xi-Obama summit

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

The Xi-Obama summit

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The debate over intervention in Syria

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

The debate over intervention in Syria

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

What the strange trial of a dead man tells us about Putin's Russia

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

What the strange trial of a dead man tells us about Putin's Russia

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

How dangerous is North Korea's nuclear test?

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

How dangerous is North Korea's nuclear test?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

A post-Davos debrief on the state of the world economy

Thursday, January 31, 2013

A post-Davos debrief on the state of the world economy

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The fiscal cliff agreement: lasting solution or just a brief respite?

Friday, January 04, 2013

The fiscal cliff agreement: lasting solution or just a brief respite?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Is Romney's debate victory a game-changer?

Thursday, October 04, 2012

Is Romney's debate victory a game-changer?

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Transportation Nation

United Airlines Left a Little Girl Alone in an Airport, Twice

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

(Armando Trull, WAMU-- Washington, D.C.) United Airlines is coming under fire from some parents and travel advocates for outsourcing a program that escorts minors flying alone from one flight to another. On at least two occasions recently, young girls have been left alone at busy airports because the escort failed to show up.

John Galbreath of Bethesda, MD paid United Airlines a $99 fee so his 12-year-old daughter, Charlotte, who was flying alone from Wyoming, would be escorted to her connecting flight at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Charlotte arrived successfully at Reagan National Airport Sunday, although her father was more than a little upset.

"Ninety-nine [dollars] for peace of mind, which I didn't get," Galbreath said. "They outsource it to a third party, the meeting of the passenger."

No one met her at the gate in Chicago, Charlotte said. "I just kind of looked at the screen and went where I was supposed to," she said.

This past June, Phoebe Klebahn, a 10-year-old girl flying alone on United Airlines from San Francisco to her summer camp in Michigan, was left to wander for two hours because her escort didn't show up at the gate. Her parents, Anne and Perry Klebahn, got a frantic call from camp staff to say their daughter wasn't on the flight.

When they called United's customer service, they were directed to a call center in India and kept on hold for 40 minutes as they waited, terrified, to hear their daughter's fate, the girl's parents wrote in an angry letter sent to United.

Phoebe was found unharmed. Meanwhile, Galbreath and United confirm he’ll get his $99 back.

 For more on this story, listen to the audio version at WAMU 

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The US and China: Prospects of the world's largest economies

Thursday, July 05, 2012

The US and China: Prospects of the world's largest economies

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Transportation Nation

Southwest's Airport Plan Wins Houston Officials' Support -- Despite United's Outcry

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Hobby Airport in Houston (photo by Gail Delaughter/KUHF)

(Houston, TX -- Gail Delaughter, KUHF)  On the eve of a Houston City Council vote to decide whether Southwest Airlines can build a new international terminal at Hobby Airport, Mayor Annise Parker is formally throwing her support behind the proposal -- and a majority of city council members are also behind the plans.

The city council is set to vote next week on whether to allow Southwest to build a new $100 million facility at the smaller of Houston's two commercial airports. Southwest wants to build five gates and a customs facility to accommodate flights to Mexico and the Caribbean, but the proposal has faced a huge protest from United Airlines, the main tenant at Houston's hub airport, Bush Intercontinental.

United launched a huge lobbying and PR campaign against the move, predicting dire consequences for the local economy if international traffic is split between the two airports. United's own economic study forecasted a $300 million economic hit if the plan goes forward.  But according to another study from the Houston Airport System, international service at Hobby would translate into a $1.6 billion economic gain.

At a Hobby Airport news conference,  Parker announced that Southwest has agreed to cover the entire cost of the terminal's construction and the city will incur no debt.  She also stressed that  Southwest is required to abide by the city's minority and small business contracting requirements.

"That helps guarantee our local workers get a chance at the construction jobs," she said. "From the beginning I have said that my decision would be based not what is best for one or another airline, but rather on what is best for the city, the local business community, and the traveling public."

The Houston City Council is set to vote May 30 on whether to allow Southwest to begin construction. Seven council members appeared with Parker at her news conference and an eighth council member has also expressed support. That indicates a vote in Southwest's favor. If the plan wins approval, Southwest hopes to start construction on the terminal next spring.

United issued a statement after Parker's announcement, saying it's not backing off on its position that a split international airline hub would cost the city jobs and hurt its competitive advantage.

Bush Intercontinental carries the bulk of Houston's airline traffic, with about 40 million travelers passing through its gates in 2011. Hobby handled just under 10 million.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

North Korea's missile politics

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

North Korea's missile politics

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Anxiety over Afghanistan and a power struggle in China

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Anxiety over Afghanistan and a power struggle in China

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