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Unemployment

The Takeaway

Surprise! Optimism in Charlotte

Friday, May 08, 2009

As part of The Takeaway's ShovelWatch project, Correspondent Andrea Bernstein is in banking capitol, Charlotte, North Carolina. Despite Wachovia's announcement that is was laying off over 500 employees in Charlotte, she found the locals there surprisingly upbeat about the economy.

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The Takeaway

Share your tips for finding work in a down economy

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Jobless numbers are the highest levels in decades and there's been little good news for people who find themselves without work. But, believe it or not, there is still such a thing as a growth industry. It's just a matter of knowing which doors you need to get a foot into. Share your tips for finding work in a down economy. Leave a comment below, call 1-877-8-MY-TAKE or email us at mytake@thetakeaway.org.

Related:
Despite a tough economy, some industries are still hiring
Getting to "You're hired!" by any means necessary
Recession depression and other woes of the employed
Personal stories of unemployment
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The Takeaway

A year after visiting the food pantry, a grandmother leaves her foreclosed home

Thursday, April 30, 2009

When we spoke with Janie Larson a year ago, the soaring cost of oil, the rising cost of food and the months of unemployment that she had just emerged from had her going to a food bank for the first time. One year later, we check in with Janie to see how she's been weathering this economic climate.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Some Recession Humor

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Part of the perpetual slideshow on unemploymentality.com

Part of the perpetual slideshow on unemploymentality.com

While economic bad news circulates like the latest flu virus we all dread, the folks at Unemploymentality have found a way to lighten the mood with some job ...

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The Takeaway

Last letters and parting shots: How to say goodbye at work

Thursday, April 16, 2009

It's a sad fact of life, and particularly this economy, that people get laid off and fired from jobs. Femi Oke went out and found stories behind the statistics. She joins us with their tales of last emails and bitter adieus. So what is the etiquette of saying farewell? Do you send a mass email to your entire contact list? Or just pack up your cubicle and slip out the back door? Here to help us figure out what is the best (and worst) way to say goodbye is Sheryl Spanier a career management consultant.
"Don't say anything negative about your former boss, because there's going to be a future boss who's going to know about that. And do you think he wants you to work for him if you've spoken that way about your current employer?"
—Sheryl Spanier, a career management consultant, on leaving a job gracefully

Be sure to check out our video "Parting shots: Allison Walker's goodbye email":

Contributor's Notes: Tips for making an elegant exit from your job from Sheryl Spanier

•The last thing you say and do is the first thing others will remember.
•Preserve your reputation and relationships with grace and gravitas.
•Keep the emotion out of your communications. Vent, if you must, privately and only to loved ones.
•Engender respect: Behave in exiting the way you behave in excelling at work — with dignity and self worth.
•Leaving gracefully requires courage and consideration for others' feelings. Remember, they are suffering a loss, too.
•Make your exit statement simple, short and strategic. Speak positively about your accomplishments and experience, state simply the business facts of your departure (downsizing, cutbacks, position elimination, change of direction/management). Say you are putting some thoughts/plans together about next career steps. Create opportunities for future follow up.
•Create a “Reason for Leaving" statement that your organization will support so that what you say and they say are consistent.
•Communicate your departure (and contact information).

Want to read Allison Walker's good bye email? Click here.

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The Takeaway

Getting to "You're hired" by any means necessary

Thursday, April 09, 2009

With unemployment numbers at 8.5 percent it’s hard for anyone who gets a pink slip to look for a job through rose colored glasses. But blogger Marci Alboher says there is promise for those pounding the pavement in this slumping economy, but it may not come from the traditional job hunting methods. She runs the Yahoo blog Working the New Economy, and she joins us with some true stories about people who are finding work in creative ways, which may be a necessity when times are tough.

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The Takeaway

Recession depression and other woes of the employed

Thursday, April 09, 2009

It's not just the market that's bottoming out in this recession. There are nationwide reports of anxiety and stress in the face of these trying economic times. Reports are so widespread that the federal government was prompted to put up website warnings about symptoms of depression, substance abuse, and even suicide. Pam Belluck is covering the story for the New York Times and in her research she met Victoria Villalba, a woman who has been experiencing severe anxiety about the economy. They both join The Takeaway to share their stories.

"There are a lot of similarities here between natural disasters and what people are going through as a result of the economy."
—New York Times reporter Pam Belluck on anxiety as a result of the recession

For more, read Pam Belluck's article, Recession Anxiety Seeps Into Everyday Lives in today's New York Times.

Also, check out the government's website, Getting Through Tough Economic Times for more information on the signs of recession depression and where to get help.

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The Takeaway

March unemployment numbers show increase in job losses

Friday, April 03, 2009

New unemployment numbers out today reveal that the U.S. economy lost 663,000 jobs in March and jobless rate jumps to 8.5 percent, the highest since late 1983. The U.S. continued to shed jobs at an unrelenting clip in March, pushing total losses since the recession started 16 months ago past five million. The figures are a sober reality check on the economy after some mildly encouraging news on housing, automobiles and manufacturing. But on hearing the news, the markets jumped. So what do the numbers really mean? We turn to Kelly Evans, an economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

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The Takeaway

Jobless in the U.S.A.

Friday, April 03, 2009

The unemployment numbers are cold and hard: The national unemployment rate hit 8.1 percent in February, the highest it has been in over 25 years. And there are other parts of the country where the figure is a good bit higher pushing twelve or thirteen percent. As we wait for the release of the March unemployment numbers, we talk to two of the faces behind the numbers. John Fox is from an area of North Carolina, where the unemployment rate is 15.7 percent and he has been looking for work in the construction field for over thirteen months. Also joining the conversation is Janet from New York City who just found a new job after a lengthy search. Dan Gross, senior editor at Newsweek and columnist at Slate, gives us some perspective on the numbers.

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The Takeaway

Illegal immigration in the era of unemployment

Friday, March 20, 2009

Hispanic immigrants, both legal and illegal, make up eight percent of the labor force in this country. In factory towns like Morristown, Tennessee that figure almost doubles. The tensions in this small town between unemployed workers and illegal immigrants may give us an indication of how the Obama administration will have to approach its immigration policies in the midst of a troubled economy. The Takeaway is joined by Julia Preston, New York Times Immigration Correspondent, who spent six months watching the dynamics of Morristown's labor market.

Julia Preston's story will be available Sunday in the New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Personal stories of unemployment

Friday, March 20, 2009

Unemployment rates just continue to rise. The lack of work has lead to the unemployed taking whatever jobs they can get their hands on. As we look at the faces behind the numbers, we are joined by Jason Reed who lost his job as a carpenter and was evicted out his apartment, and is now living with his wife and three boys in a motel room in Westerly, Rhode Island. Also on the show is Tom Crawford who used to work as a paralegal making $40,000 a year, he now works as an insurance agent barely making ends meet. We are also joined by Mark Dixon, a placement coordinator for Good Temps here in New York City. He has seen first hand the increase in people coming to him looking for work and the jobs they are willing to take.

"One of the most important things to do is sell your ability and your desire and your drive."
— Mark Dixon, placement coordinator for Good Temps, on how to market yourself to employers

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The Takeaway

Come and get it: Hyundai and JetBlue offer refunds to the jobless

Friday, March 13, 2009

It's no doubt that part of the economic crisis is rooted in fear. People are holding back on spending even if their financial situation hasn't changed because of their anxiety about the future. Two companies are trying to address that fear as a way to increase sales. JetBlue and Hyundai are both offering refunds to people who lose their jobs.

John Krafcik, CEO of Hyundai North America Motors, and Dave Barger, CEO of JetBlue Airlines, join The Takeaway to explain their companies' refund programs for the involuntarily jobless.

"We can't predict the future, but we can certainly try to take maybe some of the unknown out of the future."
— JetBlue CEO Dave Barger on giving refunds to unemployed people

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The Takeaway

States that face growing number of unemployment rates

Thursday, March 12, 2009

A growing number of states are suffering double-digit unemployment rates, fueling fears that the national jobless rate could hit 10 percent by the end of the year. In January, jobless rates rose in almost every state and the District of Columbia. Two of the states that received the highest rates of unemployment were Oregon and South Carolina.

Joining The Takeaway to discuss their concerns are Ethan Lindsey, reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting, and Noelle Phillips, an economics and business reporter for The State newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina.

"A lot of industries were hanging on to see if things were going to turn around, and when it didn't look like that was going to happen, the axe fell."
— Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter Ethan Lindsey on the drastic rise in unemployment in Oregon

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The Takeaway

As the American dream is deferred, the global economy shifts

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

The American dream is not exclusively an American institution. For centuries the ideals of the American dream: “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” have drawn immigrants from across the world to make a better life for themselves. But today—with unemployment at 8.1 percent and the housing market crippled by the credit crunch—the dream is deferred.

For a look at what this means globally, Edward Miguel, a professor of economics at UC Berkeley joins The Takeaway. He also co-wrote the book “Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence and the Poverty of Nations,” with economist Raymond Fisman.

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The Takeaway

Getting the most out of unemployment benefits

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

For the unemployed, The Takeaway continues to discuss how to dust yourself off and get back on your feet. With more than half a million jobs lost in the U.S. last month alone, those who've been laid off may be confused as to what benefits are available to them. Andrew Stettner, deputy director of the National Employment Law Project talks to The Takeaway about exactly how to get the most out of unemployment benefits.

"You have to swallow your pride a little bit and be willing to work as hard as you did to get help as you did at your job."
— Andrew Stettner of the National Employment Law Project on coping with job loss

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The Takeaway

In the red, the Golden State is making tough choices

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

After three days of intense negotiations, California lawmakers are still unable to deliver a budget. In the face of a multi-billion dollar deficit, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is preparing to lay off 10,000 government workers and plans to halt the last 275 state-funded public works projects still in operation. To answer what this means for California and for state workers we turn to Zoe Corneli, reporter at KALW public radio in San Francisco, and Ryan Sherman, spokesperson for the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, a union that is facing layoffs under the Governator's plan.

California waitress Val Simons has little faith in the legislator's ability to resolve this crisis.

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The Takeaway

Autoworkers get squeezed in GM and Chrysler repayment plans

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

General Motors and Chrysler presented their repayment plans to the Treasury Department yesterday. Unfortunately in order for them to make enough money to re pay their loan they are going to have cut 47,000 jobs and close five more plants. And the kicker is that GM needs another $30 billion to survive. President Obama's new auto cabinet (that doesn't really have a ring to it) has a lot of work ahead of them. To walk us through the reconstruction plans is Nick Bunkley, reporter for the New York Times.

For more, read Nick Bunkley's and Bill Vlasic's article, Automakers Seek $14 Billion More in Aid, in today's New York Times.

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The Takeaway

The Love of Labor (and Ikea)

Monday, February 16, 2009

Today nearly 14 percent of Americans are underemployed. This is proving to be a challenge for beleaguered bosses and disgruntled employees struggling to keep morale up in the workplace. For those who are despairing, fear not. The ideal that IKEA holds forth in the form of those little flat wrenches and a lot of elbow grease, could prove to have some answers for business leaders, policymakers and everyday workers. It turns out what is true for the success of IKEA—the sense of accomplishment many experience in assembling IKEA’s housewares—could have broader implications. Joining us to discuss a phenomenon called “The IKEA Effect" is Dan Ariely, the James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics at Duke University and author of Predictably Irrational.

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The Takeaway

In a flailing economy, China faces a wave of unemployment

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

China's economy continues to take hits as reports are in that their imports and exports fell for a third straight month. As China's population buys less, a recession looms and it is leaving over 20 million rural workers in China unemployed. For more, we are joined by the BBC's Chris Hogg who is in Shanghai.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Your Uncommon Economic Indicators: Seeking Career Advice

Monday, February 09, 2009

career_questions

Young people and their advocates are expressing concern about the state of the job market right now. At ...

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