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Tunisia

The Takeaway

How Millennials Are Remaking the Arab World

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Juan Cole, author of "The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East," says the world needs to give the revolutionaries more time, and that the young protesters who led the Arab Spring will eventually remake their home countries. 

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The Takeaway

Connecting the Voices of Democracy

Friday, June 28, 2013

Today, the overarching symbol of democracy is popular discontent—from Turkey and Bulgaria, to Brazil and again this weekend in Egypt, the language and the time zones may change, but the voice of their protest is increasingly the same. According to Columbia University Professor Alfred Stepan, these protests are a direct reflection of the levels of democratic consolidation in the countries at hand.

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The Takeaway

Two Years After Arab Spring, Unrest Continues

Thursday, February 14, 2013

The unrest that erupted into the Arab spring two years ago unleashed a broad political movement of very different groups who united to throw off dictatorial regimes in North Africa and the Middle East. They succeeded in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, and Yemen, and uprisings continue in Syria and to a lesser extent in Bahrain and elsewhere.

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The Takeaway

The Soundtrack to the Arab Spring

Monday, February 06, 2012

Since its humble beginnings in the Bronx during the 1970s, hip hop has become a global musical phenomenon with attendant forms of style and protest. Perhaps one of the greatest examples of hip hop's recent impact is in the Arab world where formed the soundtrack to the revolution with rappers like Hamada Ben Amor from Tunisia, Cheikh Oumar Cyrille from Senegal, and Mohamed el Deeb from Egypt.

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The Takeaway

A Year After Tunisia's Revolution, Where Does the Country Stand?

Monday, January 16, 2012

This past Saturday, Tunisians returned to the streets to celebrate the first anniversary of the ouster of President Ben Ali. Tunisia's current, democratically-elected leader, President Marzouki, declared January 14 a national holiday and granted pardons to 9,000 prisoners and commuted 122 death sentences. The series of protests that ended Ben Ali's 23-year reign, largely motivated by widespread unemployment and large gaps between the rich and poor, also inaugurated the Arab Revolution.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Arab Spring special

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Arab Spring special

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The Takeaway

An Islamist Victory in Tunisia and the Fate of the Arab Spring

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Tunisia's moderate Islamist Ennahda party appears to be the clear victor of Sunday's election, winning about a 40 percent plurality of the vote. In the first democratic election in the nation that ignited the Arab Spring, 90 percent of Tunisians took to the polls to vote on a r a 217 member assembly that will draft a new constitution and appoint a new caretaker government. An Islamist victory in secular Tunisia could point to a trend in the region. Islamists are poised to make electoral gains in Egypt, and have been dominate in post-Gadhafi Libya.

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The Takeaway

Tunisia Holds Its First Free Elections

Monday, October 24, 2011

Many months after a man in Tunisia set himself on fire to protest his country's lack of a viable democratic government, some 90 percent of eligible voters in the country cast their votes on Sunday. Over 4.1 million people cast their ballots in the first democratic election from the nation that ignited the Arab Spring. Early signs show that the once banned Islamist Ennahda party is leading, possibly indicating a shift for the secular nation.

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WNYC News

Tunisians Vote in First Free Election

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Tunisians headed to the polls on Sunday to elect members of an assembly that will appoint a new government and write a new constitution. The election is culmination of a popular uprising that ended decades of authoritarian rule in the country, and set off a wave of similar rebellions across the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

The Death of Gadhafi and The Arab Spring

Friday, October 21, 2011

It’s been ten months since the series of revolutions and protests known as the Arab Spring sprung out across the region. It began in Tunis, the capital of Tunisia. Tunisians go to the polls this Sunday in the first democratic elections of the Arab Spring. How will the developments in Libya may affect the entire region, particularly the elections in Tunis and then Egypt?

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The Takeaway

Middle East Wine Revolution: Arab Awakening Boosts Wine Business

Friday, July 08, 2011

Since the first rumblings of revolution in Tunisia last year, we’ve been covering the Arab awakenings often. We’ve asked for analysis from political reporters and foreign correspondents, and reported the latest news as it came in. Today, we're examining a different angle to the uprisings: commerce, particularly the growing number of Middle Eastern wine businesses

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Budding Tunisian Democracy

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Middle East correspondent for the French daily, Le Figaro, Delphine Minoui, discusses the changes in Tunisia since the January revolution and the political dynamics of the upcoming election.

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The Takeaway

Which Country Will Define Arab Spring?

Thursday, June 09, 2011

In watching the developments across the Middle East region, there seem to be one of two paths that nations experiencing the Arab Spring can take. Although 800 Egyptians died in revolts leading up to the removal of Hosni Mubarak’s long-standing regime, the country is now on a path toward more democratic rule. The same can’t be said for Libya, Syria or Yemen where entrenched regimes—or a solitary figure, in the case of Muammar Gadaffi—refuse to cede power.

While some call Egypt and Tunisia the shining model for the Arab Spring’s revolutions — isn’t it more accurate to see it as an exception to the rule of civil war? 

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The Takeaway

President Obama's Strategy for Arab World

Friday, May 20, 2011

In his speech on the Arab world on Thursday, President Obama evoked images of the American Revolution, the Civil Rights Movement and the Fall of the Iron Curtain to parallel American values and the Arab uprisings. The speech comes nearly six months after the uprisings began in Tunis, and the state of democracy in Tunisia and Egypt is precarious at best. But what concrete steps is Obama promising — and can he come through?

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The Takeaway

What Profession Should Get a Hero Award?

Saturday, April 23, 2011

Each year in New York City, the Vendy Awards go to food vendors, usually for the quality of their cuisine. Now the Venydy's have a new category: The hero award. It was announced this week to honor the food vendor in Tunisia who sparked the revolution there when he set himself on fire. And it was street vendors who first told the authorities about the attempted Times Square bombing last year.


We'll talk about this on the air soon, but we're asking you now, what other professions should get a hero category?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Libya and the Arab League

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Steven Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, discusses the developments in Libya and where the Arab League and NATO figure into the coalition forces running the military intervention in Libya.

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Women and Democracy Building in the Middle East

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

They're demanding a new law to protect women from violence, and in fact they know they need democracy to do that work. They are focusing on these issues including the issue of democracy as an enabler for work, and social justice for young people in the country. When we think about what we should push for, we should really take the lead from them.

Karima Bennoune, professor at Rutgers School of Law and a specialist on the democracy movement, women's rights and religious extremism in the Middle East, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Using Information to Beat Gadhafi

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

The United States is considering a range of options to deal with Libya, including military action and sanctions. However, there's another possibility for Libya: an information campaign and the Pentagon has reportedly explored at the option of jamming Libya's communications so that Gadhafi has a harder time talking to his forces. Matt Armstrong, lecturer on public diplomacy at the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism and publisher of  the blog MountainRunner.us, takes a closer look at how an information campaign might work in Libya.

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The Takeaway

Middle East Unrest: Nationalism or Something Else?

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Nationalist sentiment has played a pivotal role in uprisings throughout history, from eastern Europe to the United States to Africa. In the Arab world, nationalism has played less of a role. Attempts at a pan-Arab movement fell apart while nationalism evolved over the years into Islamism. But recent uprisings in the Middle East aren't springing entirely from any of the three. So, which "ism" is inspiring revolution in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and the Gulf? Aviel Roshwald is a professor of history at Georgetown University.

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The Takeaway

Refugees Flock to Libyan-Tunisian Border

Monday, February 28, 2011

It has been called a modern day exodus: Over 100,000 people have fled Libya so far in the wake of the protests and violent retaliation from Col. Moammar Gadhafi’s regime. The majority of the Libyan population lives in Tripoli, which is in the western part of the country. Tens of thousands have now fled to the country's nearest border, to Tunisia, in just the past few days. How will Tunisia — in upheval itself over recent revolution — deal with the influx?

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