Streams

 

Tsunami

Selected Shorts

In the South

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Frenemies, a love story, in a tale by Salman Rushdie

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Selected Shorts

In an Instant

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Big moments in small lives in stories by Teju Cole and Salman Rushdie.

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FT Big Read

Aceh ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Aceh ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami

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PRI's The World

This Japanese woman never gave up on her hometown. Even after the tsunami

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Tomoko Kobayashi is one of the few residents who keeps coming back to the town of Odaka in Japan every day. Residents there were ordered to evacuate after the tsunami hit Japan in 2011. Tomoko hopes to help preserve the town for future generations.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Wave: Surviving Enormous Loss and Grief

Friday, February 28, 2014

Sonali Deraniyagala's memoir Wave is a harrowing account of losing her parents, husband, and two young sons when the tsunami struck Sri Lanka in 2004. 

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New Jersey News

Possible Tsunami Observed Along NJ Coast

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Scientists are reviewing tsunami-like waves that were observed along the southern New Jersey coast earlier this month.

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Features

Stephane Wrembel, 'Tsunami,' Live on Soundcheck

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Watch Stephane Wrembel play "Tsunami" live in WNYC's Soundcheck studios. He composed the song after watching pictures of Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami.

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Features

Play About Japan Tsunami First Responders Staged for Anniversary

Friday, March 09, 2012

To mark the one-year anniversary of Japan’s devastating earthquake and tsunami on Sunday, a play honoring the first responders who tended to victims of the natural disaster and nuclear meltdown will be staged at the Ailey Citigroup Theater.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Japan one year after the tsunami, part two

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Japan one year after the tsunami, part two

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Japan one year after the tsunami

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Japan one year after the tsunami

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The Takeaway

The Fukushima Exclusion Zone: Six Months Later

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

It's been six months since three reactors at the Fukushima nuclear plant over-heated following a tsunami, forcing 100,000 people living within a 12 mile radius of the site to evacuate. Today, the reactors are still not fully stabilized, but radiation levels in one area of what has come to be known as the "exclusion zone" have dropped. The BBC's David Shukman is one of the few journalists to venture inside the exclusion zone.

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Transportation Nation

A Sneak Peak At D.C. Metro's New Train Cars

Friday, July 08, 2011

(Washington D.C. - WAMU) In a few years, Metro is getting rid of a quarter of its old rail cars, the ones that crumpled like telescopes in the 2009 Red Line train crash and were deemed unsafe by federal investigators. And in their place will be a fleet of all new train cars.

Officials say their goal is to develop something sturdy and safe, but also something comfortable and inviting

"The design has a physical aspect, as well as a psychological aspect," says Masamichi Udagawa, an industrial designer Metro brought on to help design the aesthetics of the new cars.

He says the interiors will be a dark blue color, rather than the traditional orange and brown Metro riders are used to.

Udagawa says the reason for the change is that brown isn’t a very popular color.

"People really didn't like seeing the brown again," he laughs. "The color is a very subjective thing. It's very, very context-sensitive. So in the context of the D.C. system, people are a bit tired and maybe bored with brown."

The Kawasaki Company, based out of Japan, is building the train cars and could have them ready by 2013. But Metro says they might be delayed because of the recent earthquake and tsunami.

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Soundcheck

Celebrity Charity Singles

Monday, March 28, 2011

U2, Justin Bieber and Katy Perry are among the megastars teaming up to benefit earthquake and tsunami relief efforts in Japan. But their compilation, “Songs for Japan,” will have a long road to match the success of early efforts like “We Are The World” and Live Aid. We look at why contemporary charity singles and albums tend to fall short. 

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The Takeaway

Japan Nuclear Crisis: Two Weeks Later

Friday, March 25, 2011

It’s been two weeks since the earthquake and tsunami hit Northeastern Japan. Ever since that day, Japanese officials have been working tirelessly to avert a nuclear disaster. Friday morning, Japanese nuclear safety officials said that they suspect that the reactor core at one unit of the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant may have breached. That raises the possibility of more severe radioactive contamination to the environment. Henry Fountain, Science Reporter for The New York Times explains the latest.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Japan Trying to Get A Handle on Infrastructure Damage, LA Passes Sweeping Bus Service Cuts, and Boston Band Powers Concerts with Bikes

Friday, March 25, 2011

Nearly two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, engineers still do not know the full extent of damage to roads, bridges, rail lines and other infrastructure. (NY Times)

Meanwhile, Toyota is warning factories and dealers in North America that production delays are coming, while Nissan is looking for ways around its factory closures in Japan by flipping the supply chain around. (Marketplace)

The Los Angeles MTA approved sweeping bus service cuts, eliminating nine lines and reducing 11. Officials say they are still providing adequate service while making the bus system more efficient; critics say L.A.'s low-income residents will be hurt the most. (Los Angeles Times)

WNYC looks at the 2010 New York census map.

A Boston-based band uses bikes to power their concerts. "One person can sustain about 100 watts without breaking too much of a sweat. Five people can amass enough wattage to power a small live show." (WBUR)

City-funded parking garages at Yankees Stadium have become a "financial swamp for taxpayers," writes a NYDN columnist. "Ever since it opened...two years ago, the 9,000-space parking system has operated at barely 60% capacity, even on game days. Meanwhile, its operating expenses have run twice what was expected."

NJ Transit paid nearly $3.6 million for unused vacation and sick time last year -- even as it raised fares and cut service. Gov. Christie says the agency should go to a 'use it or lose it' policy. (Asbury Park Press)

The Bay Area's Metropolitan Transportation Commission made a $10 million commitment to a new $50 million revolving fund for loaning money to developers to build affordable housing near rail stations and bus stops. (San Jose Mercury News)

The Ohio Senate voted to pass a measure banning signs that tout federal stimulus spending along Ohio's roadways. (AP via BusinessWeek)

Top Transportation Nation stories we're following: As massive bus cuts loom, Long Islanders get emotional at a hearing. A NYC deputy mayor goes on the BL Show to defend the city's bike lane program -- and voice support for the city's transportation commissioner. And: after reports that a former DC Metro employee left the agency to become a lobbyist, the agency's board put the brakes on a contract.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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The Takeaway

Japan Relief: Helping the Most Vulnerable

Monday, March 21, 2011

The tsunami came too quickly. Japan's coastal towns had only a 30-minute warning, which was barely enough time to escape the wave, and for many disabled citizens, not enough time at all. The disabled are among the most vulnerable victims of the recent destruction in Japan. Yukiko and Shoji Nakanishi are members of a Japanese relief organization that is working tirelessly to provide shelter and evacuation support to northern Japan's disabled populations. 

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Japan, Egypt, AT&T

Monday, March 21, 2011

Operation Odyssey Dawn began Saturday with coalition missiles targeting Moammar Gadhafi's tanks and air defenses. Is the United States leading this effort? Meanwhile, relief and rescue efforts continue in Japan and time is of the essence as over 12,000 people are still missing and 8,000 have been confirmed dead so far. 

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WNYC News

As Travelers Trickle Into New York, A Glimpse at Life in Japan

Friday, March 18, 2011

WNYC

Travelers from Japan trickled into New York City airports this week in the wake of the devastating earthquake, tsunami and worsening conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. At JFK Airport, each arrived with a story.

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The Takeaway

The Japanese Government's Response to Disaster

Thursday, March 17, 2011

The chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given a much more dire analysis of the nuclear threat bearing down on Japan than Japanese officials. Gregory Jaczko told Congress yesterday that the damage to at least one reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant was more serious than Tokyo has described, and suggested Americans in that country stay at least 50 miles away — well above the Japanese evacuation area of 12 miles from the plant.

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The Takeaway

Relief Workers in Japan Face Challenges Amidst the Wreckage

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

The tsunami that hit Japan's coast, washed away streets, brought down buildings and wiped away landmarks, essentially erasing any map of the region. This poses an immense challenge to relief teams who have to work immediately and systematically to save victims.

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