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Tropical Storm Irene

The Empire

Cuomo: State To Provide More Funds for Tropical Storm Costs

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Governor Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday that the state will cover the local cost for recovery from Tropical Storms Irene and Lee.

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Transportation Nation

Final Irene-Damaged Road in New York is Fixed

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Upstate New York roads, as viewed by helicopter (photo by Karen DeWitt/NYS Public Radio/WXXI)

Six months after a pair of tropical storms slammed New York State, the last road closed by the storms has been reopened.

Route 42 in Greene County, in the Catskill Mountains, is now open to traffic.

Some 400 road segments and bridges were washed away during the storms, which came after the wettest August on record.

Despite repeated requests, the state has not said how much the repairs costs, nor issued a list of the roads that have been fixed.

Last year witnessed the most costly severe weather events on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The federal government says more extreme weather events are an inevitable result of climate change, even if greenhouse gas emissions are curtailed.

 

 

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WNYC News

A Call for Federal Help to Fix Moodna Creek

Friday, December 16, 2011

A Hudson Valley congresswoman wants the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to step in and provide long term recovery and flood prevention to the Moodna Creek Watershed in Orange County.

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WNYC News

Catskills Road Reopens After Severe Storm Damage

Monday, December 05, 2011

A key road through the northern Catskill Mountains is set to reopen after being washed out by flooding from tropical storms Irene and Lee earlier this year.

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Transportation Nation

Metro North Commuter Rail Line Washed Out During Tropical Storm Irene Resumes

Sunday, November 27, 2011

The Port Jervis commuter line, cleaved in two by raging floodwaters roiled by Tropical Storm Irene, reopens today.  The washout of 14 miles of track was the most severe damage sustained by a transit agency in modern history.

Scientists and government officials say climate change will bring more frequent weather events like Irene, and without preventative action, similar washouts could become more commonplace.  (Full story here.)

For the past three months, passengers traveling to Rockland and Orange counties and points north and west of New York City have endured a frustrating commute.

During Tropical Storm Irene, a raging Ramapo River, otherwise little more than a creek in areas, surged to buckle the tracks, wash out the support ballast, and undermine railroad bridges.  Fred Chidester, the manager of the line for Metro North, called it the worst damage he's "seen in 28 years of working for the MTA."

The 14 mile stretch Irene undermined runs from the southernmost tip of Rockland County to Harriman, cleaving the 90-mile line in two.  Passengers commuting to New York have had to, in some cases, take a train, then a bus, then a train, adding up to an hour to already long commutes.

About 2600 passengers ride the Port Jervis line each day.

The MTA originally projected the line would be out until the new year, but about a month ago said trains could run down the entire track beginning November 29.  Trains will be somewhat slower and run less frequently than before Irene, while track workers complete their work.

The repair work is projected to cost the cash-strapped transit authority $40 million.

 

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WNYC News

After Intense Weather, MTA Preps for Climate Change at a Cost

Friday, November 18, 2011

When Tropical Storm Irene struck New York City, many residents were relieved that the damage from the storm that threatened to deluge low-lying areas wasn’t far worse.

 

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Transportation Nation

For Transit Agencies, Climate Change Could Cost Billions

Thursday, November 17, 2011

With Sea Level Rise, Subways Flood in 40 Minutes During Intense Storms (Map Courtesy LDEO & Civil Engineering, Columbia University)

On the Sunday after Tropical Storm Irene blasted through the five boroughs of New York City, the city exhaled. Huge swaths of Manhattan hadn’t flooded, high winds hadn’t caused widespread damage. Perhaps no one was as relieved as then-MTA CEO Jay Walder, who had just taken the unprecedented step of shutting down the entire transit system.

“The worst fear that we had, which was that the under-river tunnels on the East River would flood with salt water, were not realized. We certainly dodged something there,” Walder said at a post-Irene briefing with city officials.

Listen to the audio:

If this sounds like dystopian fantasy, consider this: the Federal Transit Administration is now advising transit agencies to start adapting to climate change. “Climate change impacts are occurring now and will increase in the future,” reads the first line of an FTA report, Flooded Lines and Buckled Rails: Public Transportation and Climate Change Adaptation, released in August. “Aggressive action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will lower the severity of climate change impacts. Yet the amount of long-lived emissions already in the atmosphere means that a significant level of climate change is inevitable.”

“We have seen significant extreme weather conditions,” says Deputy FTA Administrator Therese MacMillan in an interview in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Washington, DC headquarters. “The patterns are pretty indisputable. The hundred-year floods are occurring every 20 to ten years. The hurricane intensities are repeating themselves and being very common. The extreme winter effects that we’re seeing in the Northeast are clearly in evidence. We need to deal with the fact that these extreme weather conditions are impacting our already stressed transit infrastructure.”

She continues: "To not address it would be a relatively naïve response to the fact that there are millions of dollars on the ground that, as responsible stewards of the taxpayers money, we need to do the best job we can to deal with them. Whatever arguments folks want to have about the sources of the impacts, we’re seeing impacts.”

And with Irene, according to Columbia University professor Klaus Jacob, one of the nation’s foremost experts on transit and climate change, the city came perilously close to seeing just the kind of flooding that the FTA wants transit systems to protect against.

The price tag for that protection, Jacob says, could be as much as $15 billion -- at a time when the MTA is already $10 billion short in funding its current capital plan.

Klaus Jacob With His Model of Subway Flooding (Photo: Andrea Bernstein)

As it happens, one part of the system saw exactly what the FTA report warned of during Irene. About 35 miles  north of the city, on the Port Jervis line, the MTA saw what the line manager, Fred Chidester, describes this way: “In over 28 and a half years I have not ever seen anything to this magnitude on any of our lines.  And the type of damage that was done is just unthinkable.”

Fourteen miles of the Port Jervis line were washed away during Irene. The Ramapo River, which is usually little more than a creek in some areas, was already swollen by a month of unusually heavy rains even before Irene hit, causing it to transform itself like some water-infused Incredible Hulk.

Chidester took me on a tour of the line, where workers are now furiously trying to get the tracks up and running by the end of the month. He showed me where the river had carried boulders, larger in diameter than a full-grown man, from under the tracks to a location 50 feet away. “Both tracks were hanging in the air,” Chidester recounts, “and the whole area underneath them for about 15 feet in depth was totally washed out.”

An MTA video taken just days after the flooding show tracks twisted as easily as pieces of chewing gum, mangled into undulating waves. “That water could do this,” Chidester tells me, his voice trailing off into silence as he shakes his head.

The tracks of the Port Jervis line, following Tropical Storm Irene (image courtesy of NY MTA)

The Port Jervis line serves about 2,600 people a day. That’s tiny compared to the 5.2 million who ride the subway, but for those 2,600, the commute has been maddening. Those who ride the line are already super-commuters, with commutes easily two or even two-and-a-half hours. Even when it’s running properly, to get to or from Manhattan, riders have to switch in Secaucus or Hoboken. The line then travels through northern New Jersey to Port Jervis on the Delaware River, about 90 miles upstate, making a hook at the end.

After Irene, the line was cleaved in two.  Right where it crosses into New York and up to Harriman, the tracks have been unusable..The MTA provides buses, but the switch from the train to the bus causes both delays and anxiety. Jen Weisenberg’s commute now takes almost three hours. “I was hysterical crying. I was cursing my boyfriend out. I was asking why did I move here.”

Another view of the tracks of the Port Jervis line (image courtesy of NY MTA)

But the outage isn’t just inconvenient. The MTA invoked emergency powers to repair the Port Jervis line, at a cost of $50 million -- money it surely doesn’t have. A year and a half ago, to save money, the MTA cut some far-cheaper bus lines because its budget has been so stressed. But not fixing the line, for the MTA, is unthinkable.

Adding to the costs are a set of preparations to mitigate or prevent future flood damage. Chidester shows me where special culverts have been built under the tracks to absorb the force of the water. The ballasts are being shored up.

Metro North's Fred Chidester Shows New Drainage Pipes Under the Port Jervis Line (photo: Andrea Bernstein)

It’s hard to figure out how much extra that’s costing, because neither the MTA nor any railroad operator has experience this kind of washout in modern history. But, as Chidester says, “there’s no choice. I work for a railroad. I want to see trains running. I want to make sure they’re running right in the way they are advertised.”

Chidester says he’s no climate scientist. After trying to keep the line running through the worst snow season on record last year, and this October’s early storm, Chidester says he’s not sure about global warming. But the MTA is.

Projjal Dutta was hired by the MTA about five years ago to “green” its operations. But Dutta started just after a “freak” storm shut down the subway during rush hour in August, 2007, and his job morphed into something else: developing the MTA’s “climate adaptation” response. Making sure that the authority’s commuter rails can better withstand intense storms is part of that effort.

The MTA's Climate Adaptation Specialist, Projjal Dutta

But a lot of what Dutta does is focused on keeping water out of the subways. He takes me down to a subway vent in lower Manhattan. Most subway vents are flush with the sidewalk, like those “made most famous by Marilyn Monroe,” Dutta says.

When storm run-off rushes down city streets, it can run right down those storm drains into the subways. “With climate change and frequent flooding events and ever-higher water marks, their old levels were just not enough.” So the MTA has raised them about six inches, so floodwater will flow around them and into the storm drains -- not the subways.

Raising Subway Vents Prevent Subway Flooding During Storms (Photo: Andrea Bernstein)

There are other things the MTA is doing: platforms on the brand-new Second Avenue Subway and Number 7 lines will be “air tempered.” This century, stations will be hotter.

“We have to get that heat out,” Dutta says. “This is not for something as superficial as personal comfort, there’s lots of electronics that a train carries. We had a lot of heat related problems, so we’ve had to introduce cooling into areas that did not hitherto require heating.”

Dutta speaks matter-of-factly, but his words carry a punch. “Our core mission is to provide trains, buses, and subways.” Climate change adaptation, he says “takes something away from that core mission. If you did not need the air tempering, you could have built another station.”

He continues: “If there were more public transportation there would be less of this problem. It is ironic (that) in order to fight this greenhouse gas problem, resources have to be diverted from the regular running of a system. That’s a real tragedy.”

But perhaps not as tragic as having the entire system flooded, an eventuality that Columbia’s Klaus Jacob says is real. Jacob has worked with the MTA to model what would happen if you couple sea level rises – the FTA says to expect four feet by the end of this century – with intense storms like Irene. In forty minutes, Jacob says, all the East River Tunnels would be underwater. Jacob says he took those results to the MTA, and asked, if that happened, how long would it take to restore the flooded subway to a degree of functionality?

“And there was a big silence in the room because the system is so old. Many of the items that would be damaged by the intrusion of the saltwater into the system could not recover quickly.  You have to take them apart. You have to clean them from salt, dry them, reassemble them, test them and cross your fingers that they work."

In a best-case scenario, Jacob calculated that it would take 29 days to get the subway working again. But in the meantime, a halted subway would almost halt the city’s economy, which, he says produces $4 billion a day in economic activity.

The thing is, Jacob says, the city came within a foot of that happening during Irene. Because the astronomical tides were so high, and the storm so intense, the storm surge mimicked a future where the sea is much higher than it is now. During Irene, Jacob says, the storm surge was 3.6 feet. “Had it been not 3.6 feet but 4.6, we would have been in deep trouble.”

Manhattan Flood Zones Under 4-Foot Sea Level Rise (Map Courtesy LDEO & Civil Engineering, Columbia University)

Remember what Jay Walder said at that Sunday afternoon briefing?

“The worst fear that we had, which was that the under river tunnels on the East River would flood with salt water, were not realized. We certainly dodged something there,” Walder said.

This time.

As for the Port Jervis line, after $50 million in emergency repairs, repaired tracks are expected to be open by months’ end.

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Transportation Nation

NY MTA to Spend $50 Million on Flood-Damaged Commuter Tracks

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Flooding and other hurricane damage on the Port Jervis train line.

The New York MTA says it will cost $50 million to repair a rail line in Rockland and Orange counties that was badly damaged by Tropical Storm Irene.

2,300 riders a day use the line, making it one of the mostly lightly used rail lines in the network.  (For our previous reporting on the decision-making that went into the decision to rebuild the line, click here.)

Train service on the Port Jervis line will resume in peak periods and many off-peak periods in December.

Engineers say flooding from the storm washed away thousands of tons of ballast and earth that supported the tracks along one 14-mile stretch in particular, where the rails are badly twisted and suspended in mid-air.

Trains on the line have been largely replaced by buses. The MTA says the replacement bus service will add another 10 million dollars to the tab by the time all service is restored to normal next fall.


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The Takeaway

Senate Passes Deal to Avoid Shut Down

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

The Senate voted 79 to 12 last night in favor of an agreement on spending for disaster relief, that will avert the government shutdown that many feared might happen this week. Funding for government agencies like FEMA will now be extended for six weeks. Senate leaders are hoping the House will pass the deal later this week.

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WNYC News

MTA Vows Full Service on Irene-Wrecked Port Jervis Line by Year's End

Monday, September 26, 2011

Metro-North Railroad said service along the length of the Port Jervis line of badly damaged by Tropical Storm Irene should be restored by the end of the year.

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WNYC News

Most New Yorkers Took Steps to Prepare for Irene

Monday, September 19, 2011

Nearly three-quarters of New York City residents said they prepared their households for Tropical Storm Irene, according to a new Siena poll out today. That means they stocked up on extra food and water, and kept flashlights and extra batteries on hand. More than half of city residents also prepared a "go bag" with clothes, medicines and important papers. Less than half said they had an emergency plan in place.

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WNYC News

Some Brooklyn Sites Still Recovering From Irene

Friday, September 16, 2011

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden and nearby Green-Wood Cemetery are still recovering from Tropical Storm Irene, nearly three weeks after it ripped through Kings County.

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WNYC News

Flooding Returns to Catskills Towns

Wednesday, September 07, 2011

The rain is bad news for those in the storm-damaged Catskills where rivers and fields left swollen by Tropical Storm Irene are flooding again.

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WNYC News

A Week After Irene, Obama Tours Storm Damage in NJ

Sunday, September 04, 2011

A week after Tropical Storm Irene hit New Jersey, President Barack Obama and Governor Chris Christie toured some of the hardest-hit areas near the Passaic River in Wayne and Paterson.

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WNYC News

Catskills Dispatch | Cleanup Continues After Tropical Storm Irene

Friday, September 02, 2011

Driving along Route 28 in the Catskills Mountain, five days after Tropical Storm Irene devastated the region, can be deceptive. It’s a beautiful sunny day. Some leaves are starting to turn yellow and crimson. But if you stop in the towns along the way — Boiceville, Phoenicia, Margaretville — it’s another story all together.

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Features

Irene Ruins Heirloom Tomato Season

Friday, September 02, 2011

WNYC

Yo, Brooklyn! Say goodbye to heirloom tomatoes. Wilkow Orchards, a staple at the Fort Greene and Grand Army Plaza weekend farmers' markets, lost all eight acres of them in Tropical Storm Irene. They harvested enough tomatoes before the storm to offer the tasty, pretty beauties THIS weekend, but it will be the last time to get them until next summer.

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Features

New Lamb 'Irene Hope' Born at Central Park Zoo

Friday, September 02, 2011

While Tropical Storm Irene was churning up the East Coast, a surprising thing happened. A new lamb was born in a stable in the Central Park Zoo. According to the zoo, it is rare for a lamb to be born at this time of year.

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WNYC News

New Yorkers Help Catskill Communities Damaged by Tropical Storm Irene

Thursday, September 01, 2011

As clean up efforts continue in the Catskill towns severely damaged by Tropical Storm Irene, residents of New York City are helping out.

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