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All Things Considered

Will A Transplanted Hand Feel Like His Own? Surgery Raises Questions

Monday, April 06, 2015

A 20-year-old man born without fingers on one hand hopes a transplanted hand will give him more confidence. He knows the risks of such a visible transplant, but says, "It's something I always wanted."

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All Things Considered

Puberty Suppression Now A Choice For Teens On Medicaid In Oregon

Sunday, April 05, 2015

Medicaid in Oregon now pays for medication to suppress puberty in teens who may want to change their gender. Oregon officials decided the benefits outweigh possible trade-offs of stopping puberty.

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Meet The Bacteria That Make A Stink In Your Pits

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Scientists say they've identified the bacteria that emit that rank smell after a hard workout. Future deodorants might target that bad actor rather than blocking sweat glands or nuking all bacteria.

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All Things Considered

Videos On End-Of-Life Choices Ease Tough Conversation

Sunday, March 29, 2015

A program in Hawaii aims to reduce the number of older people who spend their final days of life in a hospital. Hawaii has one of the highest rates of hospital deaths for those over age 65 in the U.S.

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All Things Considered

Critic Faults Alcoholics Anonymous For Lack Of Evidence

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Writer Gabrielle Glaser challenges the usefulness of Alcoholics Anonymous in April's issue of The Atlantic. The program's tenets aren't based in science, she says, and other options may work better.

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Morning Edition

Why Doctors Are Trying A Skin Cancer Drug To Treat A Brain Tumor

Thursday, March 26, 2015

A drug that's effective in patients with certain forms of melanoma is being tested as a treatment for other cancers whose genetic code contains an identical mutation.

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All Things Considered

University And Biotech Firm Team Up On Colorblindness Therapy

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Six years ago, husband-and-wife scientists used gene therapy to cure colorblindness in monkeys. Now they're trying to make it work for the millions of people with faulty color vision.

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All Things Considered

A Woman's Journey From Cancer Diagnosis To 'Professional Patient'

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Advances in cancer treatments have made some forms of the disease a chronic condition. But protracted treatment, even when successful, comes at a high personal toll for patients and their families.

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Patients Often Aren't Offered Minimally Invasive Surgery

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Laparascopic surgery can be faster, safer and cheaper, but patients don't always get the choice even if it's appropriate, a study finds. Using it more often would reduce complications and save money.

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Morning Edition

How 2 Children With Leukemia Helped Transform Its Treatment

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Cancer treatment for kids has changed dramatically since the 1960s. Back then, doctors experimented with approaches that seemed promising but were also potentially toxic. Some survivors look back.

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All Things Considered

Why The War On Cancer Hasn't Been Won

Monday, March 23, 2015

Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971. The disease has proved far more complicated than doctors had hoped.

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Stats Split On Progress Against Cancer

Monday, March 23, 2015

When you dig into the number on cancer, the results are mixed. Overall, deaths are up. But survival five years after diagnosis has improved for many forms of the disease, including breast cancer.

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If You're Going To Die Soon, Do You Really Need Statins?

Monday, March 23, 2015

Many older people are taking a lot of meds, and some drugs may not be doing them much good. When terminally ill people went off statins, they said they felt better. And it didn't increase their risk.

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Wireless Sensors Help Scientists Map Staph Spread Inside Hospital

Friday, March 20, 2015

Over four months of tracking and testing, French researchers mapped the hops that bacteria made from one person to another. Within a month, a third of patients were newly colonized with staph.

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For A Good Snooze, Take One Melatonin, Add Eye Mask And Earplugs

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Hospitals are notoriously difficult places to sleep, despite efforts to make them less noisy. Cheap, simple workarounds can help, a study says. Taking the sleep hormone melatonin helped the most.

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Morning Edition

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.S.?

Thursday, March 19, 2015

The hormone that controls blood sugar among diabetics is one of the oldest medicines used today. But more than 90 years after its discovery, a low-cost version is no longer available in the U.S.

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How Much Can Women Trust That Breast Cancer Biopsy?

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Pathologists are great at spotting cancer, but less so at identifying atypical cells or DCIS, a study finds. That could lead to women getting too much treatment — or not enough.

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Risks Run High When Antipsychotics Are Prescribed For Dementia

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Results from an analysis of veterans' health records show a higher risk of death among people taking antipsychotic drugs for symptoms of dementia than has been documented before.

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From Freud To Possession, A Doctor Faces Psychiatry's Demons

Saturday, March 14, 2015

In Shrinks, Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman looks at the development of what he himself calls the most distrusted, feared and denigrated of all medical specialties.

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Nurses Have To Translate When Medical Devices Fail To Communicate

Friday, March 13, 2015

Medical technology can make patient care better and more precise. But the gadgets and computers can cause trouble, too. One big problem is that most of the devices often can't talk with one another.

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