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Trayvon Martin

It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Let's Have 'The Talk' About John Derbyshire's Misdirected Anger

Monday, April 09, 2012

Framed as a response to pieces that have run in the New York Post and elsewhere on “the talk” that some black parents claim to have had with their kids about survival in a proverbial White Man’s World, John Derbyshire’s latest post at Taki’s webzine on “the talk” that he claims some white parents have with their kids about blacks is a racist rant chock full of unsubstantiated claims and anecdotal evidence presented as fact.

Describing African-Americans as both less intelligent than and hostile to white people, he outlines a nine-point plan based on what he calls “statistical common sense” to help whites look out for their “personal safety.” These include warnings to keep out of black neighborhoods, to avoid large concentrations of blacks in public and to make black friends to guard against charges of racism. 

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Strip-Searching Moses and Stop-and-Frisking Jesus

Monday, April 09, 2012

The series of recent actions by police, vigilantes and the courts have all fit into an so-called "law and order" culture that too willingly violates, imprisons, criminalizes and humiliates our own citizens. Both Passover and Easter remind us that "law" isn't always right and "order" isn't always just.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Suspects Arrested in Tulsa Shooting, Grand Jury in Trayvon Martin Case, Corporate Earnings Released

Monday, April 09, 2012

Charlie Herman, business and economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC and Callie Crossley, host of The Callie Crossley Show on WGBH, explore the stories for the week ahead, including the shootings in Tulsa, Trayvon Martin developments, jury selection for John Edwards trial, and inflation reports.

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The Takeaway

Stand Your Ground Laws Lead to Rise in Justifiable Homicides, Report Says

Friday, April 06, 2012

Weak gun control laws are to blame for the rise in justifiable homicides, an investigation by The Guardian newspaper concludes. A higher rate of this type of killing occurs when that state has permissive gun laws or Stand Your Ground laws. Harry Enten is a writer for The Guardian.

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WNYC News

Harlem Students Take to Streets to Show Support for Trayvon Martin

Thursday, April 05, 2012

A group of high school students from Democracy Prep in Harlem added their voices to the outrage over the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin on Thursday. They wore hoodies and marching through the neighborhood. View a slideshow of the students in their hoodies explaining what it has come to symbolize to them.

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The Takeaway

New Pew Survey Examines How Latinos Identify Themselves

Thursday, April 05, 2012

A new poll released by the Pew Survey looks at how Latinos identify themselves. We'll talk about the different identities we adopt with regard to our race with Mark Lopez, associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center, and Ilan Stavans, Amherst College professor of Latino culture.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Trayvon Martin Case Evolves

Thursday, April 05, 2012

Kai Wright, editorial director of Colorlines and a contributor to The Nation, discusses how the Trayvon Martin case has evolved in the media and in the public's consciousness--and lays out the known facts of the case.

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The Takeaway

Gated Communities, Civility and Crime

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

Among Florida cities, Sanford has a remarkable amount of green space. As WMFE reporter Matthew Peddie noted for WNYC’s Transportation Nation blog, Sanford has spent more than $20 million in the last two decades creating more than 30 parks and green spaces. However, Sanford is also notable for being home to numerous gated communities — like The Retreat at Twin Lakes, the neighborhood where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed as he walked back from 7-Eleven.

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The Takeaway

Is the Trayvon Martin Case an Example of Tension Between Black and Latino Communities?

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

The commonalities and tensions between the black and Latino communities in the United States — and in particular, in the American south — have been a source of much discussion in the Trayvon Martin case. On yesterday's program, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson mentioned some dramatic statistics on how blacks and Latinos in the American south perceive one another. Duke researchers found that an overwhelming majority of Latinos in Durham, North Carolina, 78 percent, felt they had the most in common with whites. What’s more, nearly 60 percent of Latinos surveyed reported they believed that few or almost no blacks were hard-working or could be trusted.

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The Takeaway

Has the Case of Trayvon Martin made Sanford the New Birmingham?

Tuesday, April 03, 2012

Sanford, Florida, where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by 27-year-old George Zimmerman over one month ago, is currently host to the worst kind of attention a small town could possibly imagine. After weeks of protests around the country, the question lingers as to whether the small town's image will be eternally marred the way that Selma or Birmingham, Alabama still evoke the civil rights movement of the 1960s. What connection does this town have to the long history of the American civil rights movement? For answers, we turn to Isabel Wilkerson, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author of "The Warmth of Other Suns: the Epic Story of America’s Great Migration."

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Schoolbook

At a Bronx Middle School, Reflections on Trayvon and Lost Dreams

Monday, April 02, 2012

Laura Klein, who teaches at a Bronx middle school, says she has had a tough time getting her students interested in current events. But the Trayvon Martin case practically walked into her classroom. When she gave her students an assignment related to the case, she writes: "They got right to work, quiet and focused, only pausing to discuss the issue with their peers. This was an issue with which they clearly connected."

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Transportation Nation

How Public Space, Urban Planning and Public Parks Play a Role in the Trayvon Martin Case

Monday, April 02, 2012

Protesters in Fort Mellon Park (photo by Matthew Peddie)

(Sanford, Florida) Demonstrations in support of Trayvon Martin are filling parks and streets in Sanford.

The green spaces in the central Florida city usually attract residents from around the area for a bit of recreation, but now they’re functioning as a stage for civic expression.

Sanford has more than 30 parks, many of them on the aptly named Park Avenue. Planners view the city’s linked green spaces and walkable streets as an inspiration for a back-to-basics approach to urban revitalization.

In the last two decades, more than $20 million has been poured into the renewal of streets and parks, and it's something visitors notice.

Downtown Sanford (photo by Matthew Peddie)

Even Reverend Al Sharpton took a moment at a rally to praise the city.

“In the days that I’ve been down and back, Sanford is a beautiful city," he said. "It’s on the side of the water, has great potential for tourism."

Sharpton went on to lambast city officials for not pushing for the arrest of George Zimmerman, Trayvon Martin’s killer, saying the reputation of Sanford was not worth risking for his sake.

Founded in the 1870s, Sanford was conceived as a transportation hub, where steam ships disembarked and rail lines carried freight and passengers to the far reaches of Florida.

Orlando leaped ahead as central Florida's commercial hub in the 20th century, but Sanford’s economic development director Nicholas Mcray says transportation is again starting to play an important part in the city’s growth.

“We have connections to Interstate 4 and State Road 417, so we are a hub for that exchange," he says. "We have an international airport which also services 40 domestic destinations. The passenger count last year was north of a million and on target for 2 million this year. So we are coming full circle.”

Mcray says the arrival of the SunRail commuter line will also give the city a lift.

“The development opportunities around Sanford SunRail station, I guess you could say the sky’s the limit," he says. "There’s a lot of green space still left around there for transit-oriented design.”

Bruce Stephenson, the director of the Masters of Planning and Civic Urbanism program at Rollins College in Orlando, says the division of public and private space also plays a part in the Martin case.

(photo by Mark Simpson)

He says parks were originally conceived as places where people of different ethnicity, class and religious background could mingle in a natural setting. “The supposition is that being in that environment would enhance stability," he explained.

Stephenson is following the Sanford protests closely: he sees this moment as a case of good urban planning helping to shape people’s behavior. “The telling experience is that we’ve seen amazingly well behaved people in an engaging atmosphere in the public spaces.”

He contrasts the protests with the violent act that got them started. “The shooting was in a private space that was gated, guarded, and I think there’s a lesson to be drawn in what happens when we shut ourselves off from other citizens.”

Paul Harris, the chair of psychology at Rollins College, is an expert in the links between physical settings and human response. He says there are neighborhoods, not always gated, where residents don’t see their home territory ending at the house.

“They see it extending out into the yard, the street. And in that case you’re going to have people more zealously protecting those spaces.”

Harris thinks it’s a stretch to attribute the peaceful nature of the protests to the design of the parks and streets where they’re being held.

“Frankly, I think the issues that are going on are so charged that the impact of the environment is probably minute,” he says.

However, Bruce Stephenson says there are some bigger urban design lessons to be learned from Sanford.  He says some of the poorer neighborhoods reflect the downtrodden history of the city's African American residents. Yet Sanford's revamped downtown and public parks have been a resounding success.

Historic Goldsboro (photo by Matthew Peddie)

“A key concept is connectivity. That’s the test for the nation: can we connect white and black neighborhoods in an equitable manner?” Stephenson says the crowning achievement of Sanford's redevelopment is Riverwalk, a park running alongside Lake Monroe which attracts people from every background, to fish, run and relax.

“What’s important about that space is that it’s connected and linear, it runs along the water. Its whole concept is to move people and connect people. Those are the steps in creating community, and Sanford has made tremendous leaps, but there is an historical legacy to overcome.”

Stephenson says the city would do well to redouble its efforts in revitalizing its streets and parks.

Nicholas Mcray is proud of what Sanford has done to improve its cityscape. He believes the 40 percent growth in population in the last decade is a testament to the charm of the city.

“We’re an open, welcoming community. We have quality of life amenities that frankly most other communities are envious of and we think that will be shining through once all of the cameras leave.”

The parks will still be there after the crowds go home, and Sanford has plans to continue its improvement program, including a $7 million extension of the popular Riverwalk promenade.  Construction could start as early as this fall.

"A nation united can never be conquered" Sanford Veterans Memorial Park (photo by Matthew Peddie)

 

 

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WNYC News

Micropolis: Pondering the Many Meanings of a Hoodie, After Trayvon

Friday, March 30, 2012

The hoodie has become synonymous with the black Florida teen gunned down by a neighborhood watch captain as he walked through a neighborhood wearing the sweatshirt.

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The Takeaway

Friday Follow: Supreme Court ObamaCare Hearings, Anger Continues in Trayvon Martin Shooting Death, Bully is Bullied by Ratings Board

Friday, March 30, 2012

This week the Supreme Court’s scrutiny of President Obama’s signature piece of legislation dominated the headlines, but it wasn’t the only story out there. Anger over the perceived lack of justice in the Trayvon Martin shooting case continues to sweep the nation, and the controversial film "Bully" got bullied by the ratings board. These stories and more are covered by our panel of Kai Wright, Editor of Colorlines, Ron Christie, Republican political strategist, and Art Caplan of the University of Pennsylvania.

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On The Media

Trayvon Martin, Week Two

Friday, March 30, 2012

If last week Trayvon Martin’s death broke as a national story, then this week it reached a full boil. Every day new details have been leaked and analyzed, pundits have opined and the interested parties have sought to characterize each other.  Brooke again talks with Huffington Post senior reporter Trymaine Lee about how this story has continued to develop.

 

Breton - The Commission

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WNYC News

City Council Condemns Shooting Death of Trayvon Martin

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

WNYC

More than a dozen City Council members sported hoodies at City Hall Wednesday, to show solidarity with the unarmed sweatshirt-clad Florida teen who was gunned down at the hands of a neighborhood watch captain.

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The Takeaway

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi Leads Charge Against ACA

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Today the Supreme Court will hear the final round of arguments on President Obama's Affordable Care Act. While 26 states joined the lawsuit against health care reform, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi filed the original suit, and Florida is the lead plaintiff in the case. And in the midst of what Attorney General Bondi has called "one of the biggest cases of our lifetime," she is also leading an investigation into the Trayvon Martin case in Sanford, Florida.

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The Takeaway

Mayor Speaks Out on Trayvon Martin Shooting

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Over a month after the shooting death of 17-year old Trayvon Martin, the small town of Sanford, Florida remains on edge. In this conversation we speak with Mayor Jeff Triplett about how his town of 54,000 has held together through a nationally publicized tragedy. We also turn to Farai Chideya, blogger at Farai.com, to discuss the current state of the media's national coverage of the narrative and characters playing out in this sensitive news story.

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The Takeaway

One Month Anniversary of Trayvon Martin's Death Marked by Protests and New Facts in the Case

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Yesterday the case of Trayvon Martin took a number of significant turns — among them, a report that Martin knocked George Zimmerman to the ground and beat him before Zimmerman fired. Today, we review the new developments and speak with Michael Bender, a reporter for Bloomberg News.

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The Empire

'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

Legislative leaders were in high gear last night: With a Saturday midnight budget deadline starting them in the face, they got down to business, hammering out agreements on infrastructure spending; a new broadly defined commission on gambling and gubernatorial power to transfer money from one agency to another. Newsday’s Albany Bureau Chief Yancey Roy joins us with an update on where things stand.

Then, what will NOT be in the budget? Legislation to create a health care marketplace in New York. Blair Horner of the American Cancer Society will share his thoughts on what that could mean for New York as we head deeper into health care reform.

General Contractors are thrilled by the money that will be spent on transportation infrastructure. Mike Elmendorf, President & CEO of the New York State Association of General Contractors will have reaction.

Plus, Senator Liz Kruger and Senator Bill Perkins, both Democrats, want a bill currently sitting in the Senate Codes committee to be pulled off the shelf. The bill authorizes the use of deadly force in self-defense. Senate Dems say that in light of the Trayvon Martin shooting tragedy the bill invites vigilantism.

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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