Streams

 

Travel

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Lauren Collins and Burkhard Bilger on reporting in distant lands.

Saturday, April 07, 2012

Lauren Collins and Burkhard Bilger on reporting in distant lands.

Comment

Transportation Nation

January 2012: Most On Time January in 18 Years

Thursday, March 15, 2012

It turns out January was a good month for on time air travel.  The latest report from the US Department of Transportation finds that airlines had the best on-time arrival performance in January than they did for the past 18 years.  The cancellation rate was the lowest for any January for ...

Read More

Comment

Transportation Nation

First Two, Then the Rest: Airlines Pass On Fuel Costs to Customers

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Nearly every airline boosted fares over the past week. It's because of rising gas prices as Marketplace reports.

Jet fuel prices have taken off since the beginning of the year. Last week, JetBlue and Southwest decided to pass some of those costs along to passengers, and it didn’t take long for most of the others to follow.

Fuel prices are expected to keep rising, so George Hobica at Airfarewatchdog.com sees more fare hikes in the future -- within limits. "Airlines can raise airfares only so much before consumers stay home, drive or find other means of transportation," he said, noting the price jumps also apply to business travelers. "Our company was just handed down an edict, please treat the company’s money as your own and consider teleconferencing and Skyping."

Still, mergers and bankruptcies have reduced competition in the airline industry. Rick Seaney at FareCompare.com says that gives survivors more opportunities to pass along costs. "I expect airlines to continue to try to raise prices every couple weeks with limited success." This is nothing especially new. Last year when the FAA partially shutdown, airlines profited by not passing on the savings from the government's failure to collect federal passenger taxes.

Seaney says they keep a close eye on sales of middle seats. When those fall off, airlines have to roll back price hikes.

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

American Airlines Plans To Cut 12,000 To 14,000 Jobs

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

The company, now in bankruptcy protection, would eliminate as many as 16 percent of its jobs. "But we will also preserve tens of thousands of jobs that would have been lost if we had not embarked on this path," CEO Tom Horton says.

Comment

WNYC News

Hopes Are Fading For Missing In Italian Cruise Ship Disaster

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Divers and rescue personnel are still trying to reach areas of the cruise ship Costa Concordia that haven't yet been explored in a bid to see if any of the 29 people who remain unaccounted for after Friday's crash off the Italian coast are alive.

Comment

Listen to Lucy

If you want adult behaviour, treat people like babies

Monday, January 16, 2012

If you want adult behaviour, treat people like babies

Comment

Features

Cupcakes Are OK; Cupcakes In A Jar Won't Fly Past Security, Says TSA

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Prompted by "cupcakegate," the Transportation Security Administration clarified its cupcake policy in a blog post.

Comment

WNYC News

FAA Issues New Rules Aimed At Keeping Tired Pilots Out Of Cockpits

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Among the changes: Pilots must have more time off and "a 10-hour minimum rest period" prior to going on duty.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Flirtations with the Divine

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Eric Weiner describes tackling our most pressing spiritual questions: Where do we come from? What happens when we die? How should we live our lives? His book Man Seeks God: My Flirtations with the Divine is the story of his search and his travels—from Nepal, where he meditates with Tibetan lamas, to Turkey to China, where he attempts to unblock his chi; to Israel, where he studies Kabbalah, and to Las Vegas, where he has a close encounter with Raelians.

Comments [10]

WNYC News

American Airlines Files For Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Weighed down by losses, a weak economy and the ripple effects of Europe's financial crisis, the company is looking to reorganize. It says operations will continue as normal.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Married to Bhutan

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Linda Leaming talks about traveling though South Asia and finding an unexpected path to happiness and enlightenment. In her memoir Married to Bhutan: How One Woman Got Lost, Said “I Do,” and Found Bliss, she offers a rare glimpse into the quirky mountain kingdom, which is so different from the super-efficient, striving Western world.

Comment

WNYC News

Trapped In A Jet For 7 Hours, 'We Were All Slowly Losing It'

Monday, October 31, 2011

Passengers in at least four jets that landed in Hartford during Saturday's snowstorm weren't able to get out of the planes for a long, long time. Then they had to sleep at the airport.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

At The Edges of the U.S.

Monday, October 03, 2011

Canadian writers Wayne Grady and Merilyn Simonds, one the descendent of an American slave, the other educated at an American school in Brazil, write about their trip around the perimeter of the U.S. and discuss their new book, Breakfast at the Exit Cafe: Travels Through America.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

Angry With An Airline? Try Tweeting

Thursday, September 01, 2011

In the days after Hurricane Irene, many travelers find themselves stranded after cancelled flights or suspended train service kept them from going where they wanted to go. Even without extreme weather conditions complicating travel, most travelers have an an airline horror story or two, and many times the source of the problem is not the cancelled trip or lost bag, but inadequate customer service or lack of information from the airline. Several airlines are seeking to remedy this problem by using social networking for customer relations — a tactic many different types of companies are employing nowadays.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Passengers Wait Patiently as Airlines Prepare

Monday, August 29, 2011

Hurricane Irene knocked out public transport from from the Carolinas through New England, and that includes all three of New York’s major airports. A big whack of all commercial flights in the U.S. are routed through New York, as many 12,000 flights have been cancelled. Business was hit as well. Samsung was forced to delay the planned release of it’s newest phone, because it couldn't can get shipments to New York. And on an individual level weddings had to be cancelled, the convention goers got stuck in Vegas for another weekend and then there's those who rode out Irene at JFK.

Comment

WNYC News

New Rules Protecting Airline Passengers Go Into Effect

Monday, August 22, 2011

WNYC

The U.S. Department of Transportation's latest set of "flier protection" rules go into effect Tuesday. The department can now impose large fines on international flights that wait on the tarmac for more than four hours.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Married to Bhutan

Monday, August 15, 2011

Linda Leaming talks about traveling though South Asia and finding an unexpected path to happiness and enlightenment. In her memoir Married to Bhutan: How One Woman Got Lost, Said “I Do,” and Found Bliss, she offers a rare glimpse into the quirky mountain kingdom, which is so different from the super-efficient, striving Western world.

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

To a Mountain in Tibet

Monday, August 08, 2011

Colin Thubron gives the account of a journey to the holiest mountain on earth, the solitary peak of Kailash in Tibet. It’s the mystic heart of the world and an ancient site of pilgrimage for both Buddhists and Hindus. In To a Mountain in Tibet, Thubron writes of his journey, an entry into the culture of today's Tibet, and a pilgrimage in the wake his mother's death and the loss of his family.

Comment

The Takeaway

How the FAA Shutdown Impacts Consumers

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Earlier this morning, Rep. John Mica (R-FL) told The Takeaway the Democrats were to blame for partial shutdown at the Federal Aviation Agency, after Congress failed to pas a funding extension last weekend. But what does this shutdown mean for consumers at the airport? Barbara Peterson, senior aviation correspondent for Conde Nast Traveler, talks about how airfare has changed since the government can no longer collect taxes on airline tickets.

Comment

The Takeaway

Rep. John Mica on the Politics Behind the FAA Shutdown

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Partisan fighting over the debt ceiling on Capitol Hill has affected more than just the markets. Over the weekend, Congress failed to pass a funding extension for the Federal Aviation Administration, following a disagreement over cuts in subsidies. As a result, the U.S. government was forced to suspend collection of federal airline taxes, at a loss of approximately $200 million per week. The F.A.A had to furlough 4,000 employees, and airport modernization projects worth billions of dollars are now on hold.

Comments [6]