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Translation

The Leonard Lopate Show

Translation Superstars Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky on The Brothers Karamazov

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Fyodor Dostoyevsky's final novel gave Richard and Larissa their start in the world of translation. Leave your questions for them in the comments section... they'll be here March 25th!

Comments [25]

Radiolab

Musical Translations

Thursday, October 23, 2014

How Radiolab took 7 classic songs and transposed them, then translated them into 7 foreign languages. 
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Comments [27]

Schoolbook

NYC Middle School Directory Causes Problems for Non-English Speakers

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

WNYC
The city guides for applying to middle school were available only in English weeks into the application season which was a big problem for many New York City parents.
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Radiolab

100 Flowers

Monday, October 20, 2014

Years ago, Douglas Hofstadter read a poem. Just a few short lines, nothing special. But he's been translating it ever since.

Comments [19]

Radiolab

Radiolab en Español

Monday, October 20, 2014

Spanish speakers, we'd love some feedback. How does Radiolab sound in Spanish? Does it translate? 
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Radiolab

Interpreting The Front Lines

Monday, October 20, 2014

Nataly Kelly worked for a translation company that dropped her right in the middle of the most dramatic moment of a total stranger’s life.

Comments [3]

Radiolab

Serious

Monday, October 20, 2014

How a brave Ethiopian reporter put himself at risk to ask a very serious question that was seriously misunderstood.

Comments [6]

Radiolab

Translation

Monday, October 20, 2014

How the right words can have the wrong meanings, and the best translations lead us to an understanding that's way deeper than language. 

Comments [88]

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Adam Gopnik and Ann Goldstein on the challenges of translation.

Monday, May 19, 2014

Adam Gopnik and Ann Goldstein on the challenges of translation.

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WNYC News

In a City With Many Languages, NYPD Officers Rarely Use Interpreter Service

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

WNYC

Advocates allege the NYPD is neglecting residents who don't speak English, and a brutal murder could bolster their case.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

April's Book: Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Translated by Lydia Davis

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Madame Bovary, one of the most celebrated novels ever written, defined the novel as an art form when it was published in 1875. Lydia Davis’s landmark translation of Flaubert’s work breathes new life into it. When it was first published, Madame Bovary was embraced by bourgeois women who felt it illuminated the frustrations of their lives. It tells the story of Emma Rouault, whose dreams of a passionate life crumble when she marries a dull, provincial doctor Charles Bovary. She struggles to escape the tedium of her days as a wife and mother. She has a series of disappointing affairs and spends money getting into debt, with tragic consequences for her husband and daughter.

Comments [14]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Benjamin Stein's Novel, The Canvas

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Benjamin Stein and Brian Zumhagen discuss The Canvas, written by Stein and translated by Zumhagen. Loosely based on the true story of Binjamin Wilkomirski, whose fabricated 1995 Holocaust memoir transfixed the reading public, The Canvas has two inter-related narratives that each begin at either end of the book and meet in the middle.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Walter Murch on the Work of Curzio Malaparte

Monday, November 12, 2012

Film editor Walter Murch, discusses translating the work of Curzio Malaparte, an Italian of German heritage who was a journalist, dramatic, novelist and diplomat whose writing attacked totalitarianism and Hitler’s reign. As a correspondent for Corriere della Sera, the Milan daily, he wrote dispatches of the war in the early 1940s that were suppressed by the Italian government, but reverberated among readers. Murch translated and adapted Malaparte into prose or blank verse poems in The Bird that Swallowed Its Cage; The Selected Writings of Curzio Malaparte.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander on their 'New American Haggadah'

Thursday, April 05, 2012

The Haggadah, the Jewish religious text read at Passover, is 3,000 years old. It has been translated more than any Jewish book, from ancient times, to 14th-century Sarajevo, to the just-published "New American Haggadah." Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander have constructed a new Haggadah, religious, yet modern, for the American Jews of their generation.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander's New American Haggadah

Tuesday, April 03, 2012

Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander discuss The New American Haggadah, their take on a traditional Passover prayer book. The Haggadah recounts, through prayer, song, and ritual, the extraordinary story of Exodus, when Moses led the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt to wander the desert for forty years before reaching the Promised Land. Safran Foer edited Englander's translation, and major Jewish writers and thinkers like Jeffrey Goldberg, Lemony Snicket, Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, and Nathaniel Deutsch also provide commentary. It is designed and illustrated by the Israeli artist and calligrapher Oded Ezer.

Comments [18]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Does It Translate?

Thursday, October 13, 2011

As Google Translate and similar programs gain traction, Princeton professor David Bellos talks about the art and science of translation and other communication challenges. Bellos is director of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication at Princeton University and a recipient of the Booker International Translator’s Award. His new book is Is That a Fish in Your Ear?: Translation and the Meaning of Everything (Faber & Faber, 2011). 

→ Event:  David Bellos will be reading at McNally Jackson bookstore tonight at 7PM.

Comments [18]

The Takeaway

Lost in Translation? An Interpreter Speaks

Friday, July 29, 2011

Last week, Nafissatou Diallo — the hotel maid who has accused Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former head of the International Monetary Fund, of attempted rape — spoke to the media about the incident. She claims to have been badly misquoted in a taped conversation being used by the defense to discredit her. The conversation was in her native dialect, Fulani, a West African language. Her claims highlight the difficulties of translation, and the weighty responsibility on translators and interpreters to get the tone and the meaning of words correct in cases like this.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Tove Jansson's Novel Fair Play

Monday, March 21, 2011

Sophia Jansson, niece of Finish writer Tove Jansson, and translator Thomas Teal talk about the new translation of Tove Jansson’s novel Fair Play. It tells the story of the intertwined lives of Mari and Jonna—a writer and an artist—who live at opposite ends of a big apartment building.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Lydia Davis on Her New Translation of Madame Bovary

Monday, February 28, 2011

Lydia Davis discusses her English translation of Gustave Flaubert’s acclaimed classic novel Madame Bovary, considered the first masterpiece of realist fiction. In this landmark translation, Davis honors the nuances and particulars of a style that has long beguiled readers of French, giving the novel a new life in English.

Comments [7]

Features

Gained in Translation

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

When flipping open a favorite book, it's easy to skip over the small "translated by" line.

But, in reality, translating is as much of an art form as writing an original work. The history of translation is as old as the history of printing and publishing itself, and it will always be an important component of writing and of literature.

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