Streams

 

Torture

The Takeaway

The Beginning of The End for Gitmo?

Monday, December 08, 2014

The Pentagon has transferred six Guantánamo Bay detainees to Uruguay. It's the largest group transfer in five years, and the first relocated to South America.

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The Takeaway

Torture, The War on Terror, and The Whistle-Blower That Wasn't

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Researcher Scott Gerwehr knew the real role American psychologists played in enhanced interrogation. He wanted to come forward as a whistleblower, but died before he had a chance.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Who Gets to See the CIA Torture Report

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The release of the Senate's massive assessment of the U.S. torture practices has once again been delayed amid argument about who gets to see it, who gets to redact it, and whether the public will ever get to know. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law University, discusses what comes next.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Rizzo on 30 Years of Controversy in the CIA

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

John Rizzo traces the CIA’s evolution from shadowy entity to an organization exposed to new laws, rules, and a seemingly never-ending string of public controversies. In Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA, he looks at the CIA in the years after the 9/11 attacks, when he served as the agency’s top lawyer, with oversight of actions that remain the subject of intense debate today. He’s the first CIA official to ever describe what “black sites” look like from the inside, to discusses the interrogation of Al Qaeda suspect Abu Zubaydah, and address the enhanced interrogation program.

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The Takeaway

Report Claims Military Doctors Complicit in Torture

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

According to a report released Monday, medical professionals helped design, enable and participate in the torture and mistreatment of terrorism suspects. The report has been rejected by the CIA and the Pentagon. A member of that task force, Dr. Stephen Xenakis explains the findings. Xenakis is a retired brigadier general and Army medical corps officer.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Follow Up: Is Force-Feeding Torture?

Friday, July 12, 2013

We follow up on the conversation about force-feeding at Guantanamo and explain the debate over whether it's torture with Katherine Hawkins, researcher at the Constitution Project, who contributed to their recent Task Force on Detainee Treatment report.

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The Takeaway

'Herman's House': The Dreams of a Man in Solitary Confinement for 40 Years

Monday, July 08, 2013

Artist Jackie Sumell was outraged when she learned that a Louisiana state prisoner named Herman Wallace has lived in solitary confinement 23 hours a day for more than 40 years now. He is believed to be the longest-serving prisoner in solitary confinement in the United States. Angad Balla's documentary airing tonight on PBS, "Herman's House," follows Jackie as she raises awareness of long-term solitary confinement through art.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What the Guantanamo Hunger Strike is About

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Many of the 166 Guantanamo Bay detainees are now on a hunger strike and have been since early February. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University, discusses the strike and talks about a new report that found that the U.S. did engage in torture after 9/11. 

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The Takeaway

New Report Confirms Torture at Guantanamo Bay

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

A new report by the non-partisan Constitution Project concludes that, without a doubt, the United States engaged in “the practice of torture” in the years after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Currently at Gitmo, 43 of the prisoners are on hunger strikes, in protest of what they see as the unethical treatment of prisoners and their indefinite detention without trial.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Secret History of Torture

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Investigative journalist Ian Cobain argues that while the United Kingdom does not “participate in, solicit, encourage or condone” torture, when it’s faced with potential threats to national security, the rules change. His book A Secret History of Torture, shows how, from World War II to the War on Terror, the West has repeatedly and systematically resorted to torture, bending the law, and turning a blind eye. He draws on previously unseen official documents and the accounts of witnesses, victims and experts.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Crossing Over

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Investigative journalist Ian Cobain traces the United Kingdom’s secret history of torture, and why—when a nation’s security is at stake—the gloves almost always come off. David O. Russell talks about writing and directing “Silver Linings Playbook,” which has been nominated for eight Oscars, including Best Director! Mare Winningham and Elizabeth Marvel discuss their roles in the Broadway revival of William Inge’s “Picnic.” And we'll find out about the decline in corporate outsourcing and take a look at Japan's planned economic stimulus and hopes that it will lift that country out of its lasting recession.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Context and a Movie: Zero Dark Thirty

Friday, January 18, 2013

Mark Danner, frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and author of Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror, and A.O. Scott, New York Times chief film critic, discuss the film, the controversial torture scenes, and the experience of watching a film based on the recent past.

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The Takeaway

Zero Dark Thirty and the Depiction of Torture

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Katherine Bigelowe’s latest film "Zero Dark Thirty" comes out in limited release this week, but critics have already honed in on what’s become the film’s most controversial talking point: its depiction of torture. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School and editor of “The Torture Papers," explains.

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Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The “You Asked for It, Beck” Edition

Saturday, December 15, 2012

On this week’s episode, the Political Gabfest panelists discuss Michigan’s new right-to-work law and the declining power of unions while the Culture Gabfesters talk about the award-winning indie darling, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and Beck’s "Song Reader."

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On The Media

"Zero Dark Thirty"

Friday, December 14, 2012

This week’s press screening of "Zero Dark Thirty" has yielded a new headline about the controversial film: that the depicted use of torture to get to Bin laden is dangerously misleading.

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On The Media

Depictions of Torture in "Zero Dark Thirty," John McAfee's Media Manipulations, and More

Friday, December 14, 2012

Criticism over "Zero Dark Thirty"'s portrayal of torture, John McAfee's ability to exploit the press' fascination with him, and the media errors of the past year.

The Takeaway

Waterboarding May Have Been More Common than Previously Thought

Monday, September 10, 2012

We know that high value suspects like Khalid Sheikh Mohammad were waterboarded dozens and dozens of times. But new revelations by Human Rights Watch suggest many more people may have been waterboarded in the post 9/11 world than the CIA would have us believe.

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The Takeaway

Holder Says No Prosecutions Against CIA for Harsh Interrogations

Friday, August 31, 2012

Closing a controversial three-year investigation, Attorney General Eric Holder announced yesterday that no one will be prosecuted for harsh interrogation techniques carried out by the CIA that resulted in the deaths of two prisoners.

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The Takeaway

Historic CIA Kidnapping Case Back in the Limelight

Friday, July 13, 2012

In 2003, an Egyptian terrorist suspect was abducted and flown to Egypt, where he says he was tortured and interrogated by the CIA. Years later, several Americans were indicted in Italy and found guilty in absentia for kidnapping. Now one has the chance to have her conviction overturned.

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The Takeaway

Glenn Greenwald on America's Two-Tiered Justice System

Thursday, July 05, 2012

High-profile cases, where the punishment doesn't seem to fit the crime, are part of what Glenn Greenwald calls America's two-tiered justice system. That's the focus of his book, now out in paperback, "With Liberty and Justice for Some." 

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