Streams

 

Tom Wolfe

Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: High Society

Friday, September 13, 2013

Guest host Cynthia Nixon introduces two tales of avarice and pretension among the well-heeled and well-born.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: High Society

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Guest host Cynthia Nixon introduces two tales of avarice and pretension among the well-heeled and well-born.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Video: Questions for Tom Wolfe

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

The author of The Bonfire of the Vanities and the new novel Back to Blood sings a little, praises Michael Lewis, and cringes at the word issues.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

November's Book: The Bonfire of the Vanities, by Tom Wolfe

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Tom Wolfe’s bestselling novel The Bonfire of the Vanities is a portrait of New York in the late 1980s—a city seething with racial tension in Harlem and the Bronx while traders were raking in huge profits on Wall Street. Wolfe’s sharp observations skewer New York society’s greed and arrogance, and highlight the simmering resentment between the haves and have nots. The New York Times Book Review called it “A big, bitter, funny, craftily plotted book that grabs you by the lapels and won’t let go.” Read it now and get your lapels grabbed!  

 

Get the conversation started now by leaving your comments and questions about the book!

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The Takeaway

'The Bonfire of the Vanities' Revisited with Alvin Hall

Monday, May 28, 2012

Twenty five years ago, the novel “The Bonfire of the Vanities” was published. Written by Tom Wolfe, the book tells the story of a greedy, white Wall Street trader who accidentally kills a black teenager in the South Bronx, then deliberately flees the scene of the accident. Highlighting issues of class privilege, racism, greed, and politics, the book was a commercial and critical success, and came to define an era in New York City and in America. Journalist and personal finance expert Alvin Hall joins to answer the question: How much has New York changed in 25 years?

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