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Theater

'Matilda' Brings Beloved Book To Broadway

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Roald Dahl's beloved children's novel is set to hit the stage as a Broadway musical. The musical's creators say the show skews closer to the beloved book than to Danny DeVito's 1996 movie, leaning more on the original's naughty charm.

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'American Utopias': From Disney World To Zuccotti Park

Thursday, April 11, 2013

In his new one-man show, American Utopias, award-winning monologist Mike Daisey ties together three unlikely places: Disney World, Zuccotti Park — the home base of the Occupy Wall Street movement — and the annual arts event Burning Man. He talks the production and his search for his own utopia.

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Was Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. An Ordinary Guy?

Thursday, April 11, 2013

The Mountaintop is an award-winning play about the night Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. died. But some critics don't love playwright Katori Hall's portrayal of the civil rights icon as a regular guy. Hall tells host Michel Martin why she found it important to focus on the man, not the myth.

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WNYC News

Show Goes on at Theatre Program in Rockaways After Sandy

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

One of the casualties from Sandy was a wardrobe of costumes and props from the drama program at the Scholars’ Academy in Rockaway Beach, Queens collected over the past seven years. The combined middle school and high school was one of the last in the city to re-open after Sandy. And now the drama department is rushing to prepare for a performance of Stephen Sondheim’s "Into the Woods" before the school year ends. 

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On Broadway, Old Shows And New Tricks

Saturday, April 06, 2013

These days, a hit show can run not just for years but for decades. So how do you keep it fresh for new audiences? Reporter Jeff Lunden talks to people who work on three of Broadway's biggest hits to find out.

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'Sleep Rock Thy Brain' Play Uses Science As Inspiration

Thursday, April 04, 2013

The Humana Festival of New American Plays is a major event in the theater world. More than 400 plays by some of the world's top playwrights have made their world premieres there since Actors Theatre of Louisville founded it in 1976. And every year Actors Theatre commissions a play specifically for the company's apprentice actors. This year's apprentice show, Sleep Rock Thy Brain, is a suite of three one-acts that all use brain research and stage flying effects to explore the experience of sleep and dreams.

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'Kinky Boots' Walk Cyndi Lauper To Broadway

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Kinky Boots, the quirky independent British film, has been turned into a splashy Broadway musical with a score by pop icon Cyndi Lauper. Reporter Jeff Lunden takes look.

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Nora Ephron's 'Lucky Guy' And Tom Hanks Make Their Broadway Debuts

Monday, April 01, 2013

Lucky Guy is one of the spring theater season's most highly anticipated plays. It stars Hanks, in his first Broadway performance, as tabloid journalist Mike McAlary. Director George Wolfe calls Ephron's last play "a love poem to journalism."

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New York's Living Theater Drops Its Curtains

Saturday, March 30, 2013

For nearly 70 years, the Living Theater championed some of the most challenging work in New York Theater. It was the original off-Broadway company. But last month, Jon Kalish reports, co-founder Judith Malina shuttered the space she poured all of her money into and moved into an assisted-living home.

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'Testament Of Mary': A Familiar Mother, In First Person

Friday, March 29, 2013

Irish actress Fiona Shaw stars on Broadway in The Testament of Mary. It's a one-woman production by Irish novelist Colm Toibin and focuses on perhaps the most well-known mother ever: the Virgin Mary. Shaw talks about her intense, intimate role.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Flick at Playwrights Horizons

Monday, March 25, 2013

Playwright Annie Baker talks about her new play “The Flick,” along with Matthew Maher, who stars in it. “The Flick” is set in a run-down movie theater in central Massachusetts, where three underpaid employees mop the floors and attend to one of the last 35 millimeter film projectors in the state. Their tiny battles, and not-so-tiny heartbreaks, more gripping than the lackluster, second-run movies on screen, play out in the empty aisles. “The Flick” is playing through April 7 at Playwrights Horizons’ Mainstage Theater.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: Annie Baker

Monday, March 25, 2013

Playwright Annie Baker was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about the off-Broadway production of her play, "The Flick." She also told us what she's been reading and listening to recently.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Electronic Trash, The Bronfman Haggadah, "The Flick" on Stage, and Manhattan's Grid

Monday, March 25, 2013

Flat-screen televisions and monitors are harder to recycle than their older counterparts. On today’s showwe'll find out what’s happening to this new kind of trash. Edgar M. Bronfman and illustrator Jan Aronson talk about their new version of the Haggadah. Annie Baker talks about her latest play, “The Flick,” along with actor Matthew Maher. And, we’ll hear the little-known story of John Randel, Jr., the man who invented Manhattan’s street grid in the 19th century.

Features

Critics' Picks: What's Worth the Buzz (And What Isn't) on Broadway

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

A handful of performances, both on and off Broadway, are making headlines this month — for reasons both good and bad: Of one of the newest shows on the Great White Way, one critic fumes: "It's one of the worst things that I've seen on Broadway in I don't know how long."

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Around Broadway

Ann Richards is Resurrected in 'Ann'

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

The former Texas governor tells her own story in "Ann," the one-woman show written and performed by Holland Taylor and directed by Benjamin Endsley Klein

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Familiar Folks Make Up A Play's 'Good People'

Monday, March 18, 2013

The most frequently produced play in America these days is a semiautobiographical look at class divides in the modern U.S. David Lindsay-Abaire's Good People explores what can happen when two kids from the same neighborhood grow up to become two very different adults.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“Belleville” at New York Theater Workshop

Monday, March 18, 2013

Maria Dizzia and Greg Keller talk about starring in Amy Herzog's play “Belleville.” It’s about Abby and Zack, a young American couple who have shirked the stability of a comfortable post-graduate life in the United States for Belleville, a bohemian neighborhood in Paris, but their relationship is put to the test. “Belleville” is playing at the New York Theatre Workshop and has been extended through April 14.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State, "Belleville," Sam Lipsyte's Stories, Stem Cell Research

Monday, March 18, 2013

BBC foreign correspondent Kim Ghattas looks at Hillary Clinton’s time as Secretary of State and how she went from being called a polarizing politician to a popular diplomat. Actors Maria Dizzia and Greg Keller discuss the off-Broadway production of “Belleville.” Sam Lipsyte talks about his new book of short stories called The Fun Parts. Esquire editor Tyler Cabot and researcher Dr. Anthony Atala explain the current state of stem cells research.

WNYC News

One NY Artist: Playwright David Henry Hwang

Saturday, March 16, 2013

There are thousands of artists is New York City, some scratching out a living while perfecting their craft in studios, basements and on stage.  WNYC is bringing a few of them to the spotlight, in their own voices.

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Studio 360

Edie Falco: The Queen of Cable

Friday, March 15, 2013

If we’re living in a "golden age" of television, Edie Falco is its queen. After working for years on network shows, she made the jump to HBO to play a troubled prison guard on Oz, then crossed over to the other side of the law as the matriarch of America’s most famous mafia family in The Sopranos ...

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