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The Beatles

The Takeaway

'The Black Album' Puts The Beatles Back Together for New Generation

Monday, August 18, 2014

"The Black Album" reimagines The Beatles, providing a compilation of songs from the solo careers of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Star.

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Spinning on Air

The World's Most-Used Musical Sequence!

Sunday, July 06, 2014

What do Beethoven, David Bowie, Green Day, Mozart, *NSYNC, Pete Seeger, Michael Jackson, Ray Charles, The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Duke Ellington, The Supremes, Rihanna, and many others all have in common? They all use the Andalusian Cadence, a four-note progression that's the world's most-used musical sequence.

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Soundcheck

Movie Date: The Beatles On The Big Screen; Benmont Tench Plays Live; Andalusian Cadence 101

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

In this episode: Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ first TV appearance here in the U.S., so The Takeaway’s Movie Date co-hosts look back at the band’s many appearances on the big screen -- from A Hard Day’s Night to How I Won The War -- as well as the role that their music has played in film soundtracks over the years.

Then: If you’ve ever heard a song by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, or seen them in concert, or watched a music video, then you know that keyboardist Benmont Tench is an essential part of the Heartbreakers' sound. Now, for the first time, the longtime go-to sideman is releasing his own solo album. Hear Tench perform songs from You Should Be So Lucky in the Soundcheck studio.

And: For years, WNYC and WQXR host David Garland has been fascinated by “the Andalusian Cadence” -- a musical pattern that has been at the core of great music for more than 500 years. Hear how this distinctive sequence of four notes links together Beethoven, the Supremes, Bowie, Rihanna and many others. (Want more? Check out Garland's recent episode of Spinning on Air.)

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Beatles Land at JFK: Were You There?

Friday, February 07, 2014

The Beatles made their first stateside appearance 50 years ago today, arriving at the newly named JFK to thousands of screaming fans and hundreds of reporters. Sunday is the 50th anniversary of their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, marking what's known as the beginning of the British Invasion. Jim Von Schilling, professor of English and Humanities at Northampton Community College and the Baby Boomer Studies area chair for the American and Popular Culture Associations, talks about what happened when John, Paul, George and Ringo came to the U.S.

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The Takeaway

The Beatles Effect, Fifty Years Later

Friday, February 07, 2014

With the 50th anniversary of The Beatles's legendary performance on the Ed Sullivan Show this sunday, we take a look at the modern bands who owe John, Paul, George, and Ringo some credit. From Radiohead to Broken Bells, John Schaefer, host of WNYC's Soundcheck, explains why so many bands draw on the experimental yet harmony-driven music of The Beatles.

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The Takeaway

Inside the Birth of Beatlemania

Friday, February 07, 2014

On February 9, 1964, tuning up to the sound of screaming girls, The Beatles's first notes blasted across the airwaves in the US. 73 million Americans tuned in to see the Fab Four on The Ed Sullivan Show for the first time. Vince Calandra was the program coordinator for The Ed Sullivan Show at the time. He reflects on the beginning of Beatlemania in the United States, and that historic night. 

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The Takeaway

Beatlemania: From 1964 to 2014 | Dylan Farrow, Woody Allen and 'Minding Our Business' | Is Facebook the Best Place to Archive our Memories?

Friday, February 07, 2014

Dylan Farrow, Woody Allen and 'Minding Our Business' | An App Against Cyberbullying | Is Facebook the Best Place to Archive our Memories? | Beyond the Olympics: A Look at the Future of Russia | Beatlemania: From 1964 to 2014 | The Beatles Effect: Fifty Years Later

Spinning on Air

A Day to Celebrate Lennon: His Best Works, and Thoughts from Yoko

Sunday, December 08, 2013

John Lennon wrote songs that reflected, inspired, and shaped our lives. With The Beatles, and during his solo career, Lennon questioned and challenged what a song could be, and gave us new possibilities. He was murdered in New York City on December 8, 1980, and on this anniversary, we honor his life and legacy. David Garland presents a range of Lennon's famous and less-well-known songs, and speaks with Lennon's widow Yoko Ono about what the songs mean to her and the world.

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Soundcheck

How The Beatles' 'I Want To Hold Your Hand' Changed Everything

Friday, November 22, 2013

Soundcheck host John Schaefer talks with New York Times music critic Allan Kozinn about his new book, which claims The Beatles' 1963 single "I Want To Hold Your Hand" changed everything for the band.

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Soundcheck

Blues Album Honors JFK; The Beatles' 'I Want To Hold Your Hand'; James McBride

Friday, November 22, 2013

In this episode: Soundcheck listens back to selections from the album Can't Keep From Crying: Topical Blues on the Death of President Kennedy, recorded in the weeks after the assassination. 

The New York Times writer and Beatles expert Allan Kozinn talks about his new book, Got That Something! How the Beatles’ “I Want to Hold Your Hand” Changed Everything.

And, we revisit a recent interview and session from author and musician James McBride, who's book The Good Lord Bird recently won the National Book Award.

 

Spinning on Air

Yoko Ono Presents "Take Me to the Land of Hell"

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Yoko Ono has always pushed the boundaries of art, culture, and politics. At 80 years old she's still an active, daring artist and musician, and a provocative public figure. Now the controversial legend joins David Garland to present her newest work, the album Take Me to the Land of Hell.

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Soundcheck

The Beatles' 'Good Ol' Freda'

Thursday, September 12, 2013

There’s still one tale left to tell about the Beatles, and this one’s about their longtime secretary Freda Kelly.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How the Beatles Rocked the Kremlin

Monday, May 13, 2013

Leslie Woodhead reveals how the music of the Beatles played a major role in waking up an entire generation of Soviet youth, opening their eyes to 70 years of bland official culture and rigid authoritarianism. In How the Beatles Rocked the Kremlin, he writes about how, in the USSR, music fans risked repression to hear the Beatles, and the Beatles and the bands they inspired helped break down the walls of Soviet culture.

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Soundcheck

Albums, Anniversaries, And Music Trends To Watch In 2013

Thursday, January 03, 2013

Matthew Perpetua, editor of Buzzfeed Music, previews some of the music to look forward to in the coming year.

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The Takeaway

Remembering George Harrison and the Beatles with Louise Harrison

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Fifty years ago, four young men named Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, and Pete Best stepped into a studio for the first time to record a few songs. They called themselves the Beat Brothers, and they were more or less a backup band for a singer named Tony Sheridan. The Beat Brothers did not remain a backup band for long. Pete Best would be replaced by Ringo Star, and the Beat Brothers became the Beatles, one of the most enduring and popular bands in history.

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Soundcheck

The album's big idea

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

John Schaefer asks, what IS a concept album anyway?

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Soundcheck

Gig Alert: The Beatles Complete on Ukulele

Friday, January 14, 2011

For two days, Mark Greenawalt and his gang of uke-masters will play the complete Beatles on little tiny ukuleles.

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Features

At Long Last, The Beatles Come to iTunes

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

After years of negotiations, the Beatles' music will be available for sale at the iTunes music store. WNYC and WQXR's music experts weigh in on the big news.

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The Takeaway

John Lennon: 'Nowhere Boy' to 'Nowhere Man'

Friday, October 08, 2010

John Lennon would have turned 70 this weekend. A movie coming out Friday looks back fifty-some years ago, before anyone knew Lennon's name, when he was simply a teenager growing up in Liverpool, England.

The film, called "Nowhere Boy," focuses on John Lennon’s youth: growing up, discovering music, becoming reacquainted with his estranged mother and being raised by his fiercely protective Aunt Mimi.

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Studio 360

Remembering George Harrison

Saturday, December 08, 2001

We asked writer Tim Riley to reveal some of the things one might overlook about the former Beatle who passed away a week ago.

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