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Thailand

The Takeaway

Relief, Democracy & Corruption in the Philippines

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Adding to Super Typhoon Haiyan's damage is a long-standing problem that stems from a government plagued with inefficiencies and a history of corruption. Richard Chu is an Associate Professor of Philippine Colonial History, Pacific Empires, and Asian-Pacific America at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst. Chu, who was born and raised in the Philippines, explains how the country's long history of corruption will play out in the relief effort.

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Transportation Nation

Beyond the School Bus: How Children Around the World Get to School

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

For thousands of children worldwide, the toughest part of getting an education is getting to school.

Walking to school in Calcutta  (photo by Alfred Yaghobzadeh/SIPA)

A new exhibit now on display at the United Nations chronicles those sojourns.  Journeys to School follows the routes of children in 13 different countries take as they walk, ride donkeys, snowmobile, ride the subway, and even canoe to school. Many of them must navigate dangerous roadways -- an issue that was thrown into sharp relief in New York City last week, where a 6-year old boy was struck by a truck just blocks from his school.  All the photos underscore the link between transportation and education. Getting to school in a safe -- not to mention timely -- fashion is as important as the condition of the classroom.

(Photo by Kate Hinds)

Children going to school via somlot, a motorcycle rickshaw in Mae Sot, Thailand. The driver is also the children's teacher. "If I can't get the kids only 50% would attend class," he said. (Photo by Nicolas Axelrod/SIPA)

According to UN statistics, 1,000 people under the age of 25 are killed in traffic crashes each day.

Six-year-old Elizabeth Atenio walks two hours every day to attend classes at the Kibera School for Girls in Nairobi. (Photo by Nichole Sobecki/SIPA)

While much of the exhibit was devoted to countries in the developing world, some children are in major cities -- including New York.

14-year-old Far Rockaway resident Santiago Munoz, who commutes over two hours each way to school in the Bronx (photo by Kate Hinds)

Santiago Munoz lives in Far Rockaway, Queens -- a New York City neighborhood devastated by Sandy. Before the storm, Santiago's commute to the Bronx High School of Science was already daunting.

"I used to walk six blocks to the nearest A train station," he said, "and from there I would ride it for around, I would say 50 minutes, then transfer to the 4 train for 40 minutes." Tack on a ten minute walk from the station to the school, and his commute -- on an average day -- was one hour and 40 minutes.

But then Sandy washed out a key segment of the A train, and he now takes two buses to get to the subway. "And now it takes me two hours and a half to get to Bronx Science." He says he uses his commute time to do homework or catch up on sleep.

Munoz said the exhibit gave him perspective. While he acknowledges his commute appears tough to the average New Yorker, "compared to these kids -- not at all. They're very inspiring."

Ruth McDowall, standing in front of her photographs of schoolchildren in Nigeria (photo by Kate Hinds)

Photographer Ruth McDowall talked about the average school day for children of the nomadic Fulani minority in Kulumin Jeji, Nigeria.  "They have to wake up at 5:00 in the morning," said McDowall, "to do chores like collecting firewood, getting water -- sometimes it can take an hour or more in dry season." The kids start walking to school by 6:30 am. "They get to school by eight, do about three hours of school, and then do another hour and a half walk home." Because the walk is long and hot, many children become dehydrated on the way to school, where they often find it difficult to concentrate. When they get back home, the rest of the day is devoted to herding responsibilities.

(photo by Kate Hinds)

 

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon (photo by Kate Hinds)

The exhibit is on display in the United Nations Visitors Center until April 26, 2013.  It's organized by UNESCO, public transportation company Veolia Transdev and photo agency SIPA Press.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Did Slaves Catch Your Seafood Dinner?

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Thailand is one of the largest exporters of seafood to the United States. On today’s Underreported segment, Global Post’s senior southeast Asian correspondent Patrick Winn investigates claims that forced labor is used on Thai fishing boats.

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Radiolab

The Perfect Yellow

Monday, May 21, 2012

Jad and Robert wonder if maybe they could add to their color palette. Jay Neitz wondered the same thing, sort of. Take a monkey that can't see red, for example. Couldn't you just give them the red cones they were missing? So he took the human gene for red cones, ...

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The Takeaway

Bangkok Braces for Dangerous Floods

Friday, October 14, 2011

In Thailand, flooding has plagued large areas of the country since July, and now it appears to be headed for the city of Bangkok. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has issued an evacuation warning for suburbs of the area, which caused many citizens there to panic. Flood waters are flowing south toward Bangkok, and have already affected northern parts of the city.

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The Takeaway

Asian Markets Get Boost from Thai Election

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

The youngest sister of Thailand’s ousted former premier Thaksin Shinawatra is poised to become the country’s sixth leader in under five years. Introducing herself to our partner the BBC as "just a simple lady, and a lady that will be willing and sincere to help the country," Yingluck Shinawatra is Thailand's president-elect following Sunday's elections, which gave a resounding win to the Puea Thai political party. 

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

IMF post-DSK, Obama vs Israel, and Thai elections

Thursday, May 19, 2011

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WQXR Features

Thai Court Ends Case Against Mikhail Pletnev

Sunday, December 05, 2010

An investigation has been dropped against Russian conductor and pianist Mikhail Pletnev, who was arrested last summer in Thailand on suspicion of molesting a teenager.

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The Takeaway

Fighting Continues in Bangkok

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

The Thai government has imposed a curfew in Bangkok after a military operation to remove protesters from the city center. However, there is still fighting in parts of the capital and TV cameras are showing smoke rising from burning buildings. The BBC's Lucy Williamson is in Bangkok. She tells us what she's seeing there and whether the crisis is over.

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WQXR News

Thai Red-Shirt Protest Leaders Surrender

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Leaders gave up when armored vehicles rammed through barricades and soldiers opened fire.

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The Takeaway

Update From Thailand: Is a Cease-Fire Possible?

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

The authorities in Thailand say they've received a new offer of a ceasefire from anti-government protesters, who've been engaged in a violent stand-off with the army in Bangkok.

 

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WQXR News

Thai Leaders Reject Talks with Red Shirts

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

The Thai government rejected requests for talks today from anti-government red-shirt protestors.

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The Takeaway

Violent Unrest Continues in Thailand

Monday, May 17, 2010

Anti-government unrest continues in downtown Bangkok and has spread to other areas of the capital, leaving at least 37 dead and hundreds injured in four days. On Sunday, the Thai government ruled out U.N.-backed mediation talks, which had been suggested by protest leaders; the government says no outside help is needed.  

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Thai Protests, Morning Headlines

Monday, May 17, 2010

The Global Post's Thailand correspondent, Patrick Winn describes the chaos in Bangkok; headlines.

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WQXR News

Thai Red-Shirt General Seh Daeng Dies

Monday, May 17, 2010

Five days of street battles have killed 37 people in Bangkok this past week.

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WQXR News

Deadly Bangkok Clashes Continue

Friday, May 14, 2010

At least 10 people have been killed and over 100 wounded in clashes in Bangkok between protesters and army forces.

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The Takeaway

Renegade General Khattiya Sawasdipol Shot In Front of Reporters and Protesters

Friday, May 14, 2010

Thai General Khattiya Sawasdiphol was shot yesterday before a crowd of reporters and protesters in a busy street in Central Bangkok. The general, who broke ranks with the government in support of the protesters, remains in critical condition.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Underreported: Thailand’s Turmoil

    Thursday, May 13, 2010

    On this week’s Underreported, Duncan McCargo, a leading scholar of Thai politics, discusses his fieldwork about the conflict in southern Thailand.

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    WQXR News

    Thai Security Forces Fire at Protestors

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010

    Security forces in Thailand opened fire today at hundreds of protestors headed on motorbikes and in trucks to a rally outside Bangkok.

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    WQXR News

    Thai Military To Use Ammunition On Protestors

    Tuesday, April 20, 2010

    Thailand's military announced today that it would use live ammunition against "Red-Shirt" protesters if they continue their actions against the Thai government.

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