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Terrorism And Security

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Omar Khadr & Guantanamo

Thursday, September 29, 2011

In July 2002, 15-year-old Omar Khadr was picked up in Afghanistan by U.S. forces and accused of killing an American soldier with a hand grenade. Although he is a Canadian citizen, Kadhr remains in the U.S. Prison at Guantanamo Bay and is the only Westerner still held there. Filmmakers Luc Côté and Patricio Henriquez talk about about their documentary "You Don’t Like the Truth: 4 Days Inside Guantanamo," which includes excerpts from Khadr’s 2003 videotaped interrogation by Canadian intelligence officers. “You Don’t Like the Truth” is currently playing at Film Forum through October 4. 

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WNYC News

NYPD Can Take Down Small Planes: Kelly

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly clarified a statement he made that the NYPD could shoot down a plane, adding the department only had the ability to shoot down small planes, like crop dusters.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fawaz Gerges on the Rise and Fall of Al-Qaeda

Friday, September 16, 2011

Fawaz Gerges gives a history of al-Qaeda, showing its emergence from the disintegrating local jihadist movements of the mid-1990s-not just the Afghan resistance of the 1980s. In The Rise and Fall of Al-Qaeda, he reveals that transnational jihad has attracted only a small minority within the Arab world and possesses no viable social and popular base. He also describes how the democratic revolutions that swept the Middle East in early 2011 show that al-Qaeda has no influence over Arabs' political life. Gerges argues that the West has become trapped in a "terrorism narrative," but that Al-Qaeda is no longer a serious threat.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dana Priest on Top Secret America

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Award-winning reporter Dana Priest investigates the top-secret world that the government created in response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In Top Secret America: The Rise of the New American Security State, she writes that it has become so enormous, so unwieldy, and so secretive that no one knows how much money it costs, how many people it employs or exactly how many agencies duplicate work being done elsewhere. The system put in place to keep the United States safe may be putting us in greater danger.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Homegrown Terror Hearings

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Karen Greenberg, executive director of the Center on Law and Security at NYU, discusses the hearings, being held right now by NY Rep. Peter King, which address the national security threat of homegrown terror and the radicalization of Muslim Americans. 

→Watch and chat about the hearings at It's a Free Country.

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The Takeaway

After The Takeaway: John Hockenberry Reacts to the Oslo Terror Attacks

Monday, July 25, 2011

The Takeaway’s co-host John Hockenberry reacts to today’s discussion of the Oslo terrorist attacks that took place on Friday. With nearly one hundred dead and the same number injured, Hockenberry questions the role of the internet in either fueling or deflating the hunger for violence in extremists such as Anders Behring Breivik, the confessed-suspect of the attacks. Does the passivity of the internet allow extremists to follow an easier path to violence? Hockenberry discusses this and freedom of assembly and expression in the digital age.

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The Takeaway

Norway Suspect Wanted to Wear Outfit, Deliver Public Message in Court

Monday, July 25, 2011

Today's arraignment of Anders Behring Breivik, the already-confessed suspect in terror attacks that left nearly 100 people dead across Norway on Friday, was closed to the press. So too will be Breivik's trial, a judge has ruled, preventing the Christian fundamentalist and apparent right-wing extremist who wanted to "defend Europe" from Muslim immigration and liberal governmental policies from wearing an outfit reportedly bearing a crusader's cross. 

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The Takeaway

Norway Attacks Spotlight Europe’s Extremists

Monday, July 25, 2011

As Europe struggles with issues of integration and assimilation, Norway’s attacks have exposed the danger of the continent's right-wing extremists. The suspect’s tirades against multiculturalism and Islam come at a time when governments across the continent work to ease immigration and cultural differences. The country must now face the prospect of more violence.

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The Takeaway

Your Take: The Challenges of Multiculturalism in The U.S. and Abroad

Monday, July 25, 2011

In the wake of twin terror attacks in Norway — apparently carried out by one Christian fundamentalist man who targeted liberal policies on immigration and Muslims — we've been asking you: What are the challenges of increasing multiculturalism in the U.S., and how do those challenges impact your life? Today we listen to and read your responses, as well as hear audio from one of the survivors of the attacks. 

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The Takeaway

After Oslo Attack, Challenges of Multiculturalism Brought to Light

Monday, July 25, 2011

The country of Norway observed a period of silence this morning for the victims of the attacks that took place on Friday. Anders Behring Breivik, an apparent right-wing extremist and Christian fundamentalist, is being held after apparently targeting Norway's government institutions for their liberal policies toward immigration. The combined death toll from the bombing in Oslo and shooting on the island of Utoya now stands at 93, with 97 injured. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported, Part II: Concerns about Terrorism Delay US Aid to Somalia

Thursday, July 21, 2011

More than 2.5 million Somalis are now in desperate need of food, but it wasn’t until late Wednesday that the State Department announced that it would send food aid to the country. The reason? Concerns that sending food aid would be aiding al-Shabab, which controls parts of southern Somalia and which the United States views as a terrorist organization. On today’s Underreported, Eliza Griswold, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation and author of The Tenth Parallel, describes why the State Department was concerned that al-Shabab would use the food as a weapon and the challenges of providing food aid to areas where aid workers were banned until quite recently.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Eleventh Day

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan explain the circumstances of 9/11 by examining not only the sequence of events leading up to the disaster and the persons involved, but also the response of the U.S. government on that day and the efforts of U.S. intelligence immediately before and after the attack. Their book The Eleventh Day: The Full Story of 9/11 and Osama bin Laden draws on previously classified records and raw transcripts, investigates the response of President Bush and the U.S. military that day, and examines the failure to intercept the hijacked airliners. They document the untruths told afterward by U.S. officials and examine the “9/11 truth” movement, and look at where we stand now, ten years later.

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The Takeaway

US to Try Somali Terror Suspect in Civilian Court

Wednesday, July 06, 2011

The Justice Department announced on Tuesday that it will prosecute a Somali man accused of having ties to two terrorist groups in a civilian court.

The man, Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame was charged with nine counts related to accusations that he provided support to the Shabab in Somalia and Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula in Yemen. Though he is reported to be in his mid-20s and has not been charged with plotting any specific attacks, the Justice Department has called Warsame a "Shabab leader."

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The Takeaway

With Troop Drawdown, A More Clandestine War on Al-Qaida

Thursday, June 30, 2011

A week after President Obama announced the time line for withdrawing troops from Afghanistan, his top counter-terrorism adviser, John Brennan, says the US war on al-Qaida is far from over. Immediately following the death of Osama bin Laden, Brennan said in an interview on NBC's Today Show that the US would continue to "pummel the rest of Al Qaida." Now that goal is being laid out in the form of official strategy, with the U.S. vowing to focus more on clandestine operations and attacks to take out key leaders of the terrorism network.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Peter Bergen: After Bin Laden

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Peter Bergen, CNN's national security analyst and author of The Longest War: The Enduring Conflict between America and Al-Qaeda, weighs in on the current state and future of the war on terror.

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The Takeaway

After Arrest of Imams, Florida's Muslim Community Shaken

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

In the first major case of homegrown terrorism in this post-Osama bin Laden era, six people were indicted by the FBI for funneling around $50,000 to terrorists in Pakistan. Two of those arrested were imams from south Florida. Nearly ten years out from the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, we evaluate how the relationship between federal law enforcement officials and Muslim communities has evolved in order to more effectively work together to prevent homegrown terrorism. Asad Ba-Yunus, a former Miami-Dade assistant state attorney who now serves as legal adviser for the Coalition of South Florida Muslim Organizations.

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The Takeaway

Two Florida Imams Arrested on Charges of Supporting Taliban

Monday, May 16, 2011

Monday afternoon, two Florida imams are scheduled to be arraigned in a federal court in Miami after being arrested for allegedly providing financial support for the Pakistani Taliban. Imam Hafiz Muhammed Sher Ali Khan runs the city's oldest mosque, the Flagler Mosque. He, in addition to his two sons, and three others in Pakistan, were indicted for supporting terrorist organizations in Pakistan. Jay Weaver, federal courts reporter for The Miami Herald, talks about the case and the role of the Khan family in Miami.

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The Takeaway

Without New Leader, Future of Al-Qaida in Limbo

Friday, May 13, 2011

With the death of Osama bin Laden, al-Qaida is now calling on all its followers to prepare do-it-yourself plans of attack against America. And it’s a sharp contrast to the strategy taken on by bin Laden, which focused on long-term planning for one big attack on U.S. soil. This message from the terror network’s online presence is just among the first signs that a change in leadership will also mean a change in strategy. And it seems that without a prominent candidate, the future of the organization is in limbo. We talk with Scott Shane, national security reporter for The New York Times who broke this story for the paper.

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It's A Free Blog

TSA and Pat-Downs: How Far do we Go for Safety?

Monday, May 09, 2011

I hate using lines like, "if we do this, we're letting THEM win...", because this really isn't about THEM at all. This is about US.

-Solomon Kleinsmith, on the balance between personal freedom and safety.

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The Takeaway

Proof is in the Hard Drives: Bin Laden's Terror Tech

Friday, May 06, 2011

After poring over documents and hard drives taken out of the compound in Abbottabad where bin Laden was killed, intelligence analysts have surmised that the al-Qaida leader was consistently in touch with the terrorist network he helped create, and still intimately involved in plotting more attacks. A story in The New York Times details the data found and C.I.A. surveillance conducted before the mission to take out bin Laden was completed. We're joined by Scott Shane, a New York Times reporter who worked on the story. 

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