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Terrorism And Security

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Coffee vs. Booze Edition

Saturday, April 27, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the challenges of questioning and prosecuting Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and the handling of terror suspects since 9/11. They also discuss the complexities that confront Colorado as it tries to regulate its new marijuana industry.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Kurt Eichenwald on 500 Days

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Kurt Eichenwald recounts the first 500 days after 9/11, looking closely at the decisions, deceptions, and delusions of the 18 months that changed the world forever, as leaders raced to protect their citizens in the wake of 9/11. In 500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars, he moves from the Oval Office to Number 10 Downing Street, from Guantanamo Bay to the CIA headquarters, from the al-Qaeda training camps to the torture chambers of Egypt and Syria. He reveals new information from the terror wars, including never before reported details about warrantless wiretapping, the anthrax attacks and investigations, and conflicts between Washington and London.

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The Takeaway

What Does the Future of Al-Qaida Look Like?

Friday, June 17, 2011

Big changes continue for al-Qaida—earlier this week, the killing of Fazul Abdullah Mohammed dealt another heavy blow to the terrorist network, which then finally announced a new leader, Ayman Zawahiri. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates played down the news, saying he lacks the 'charisma' Bin Laden had. So what does the future look like for Al-Zawahiri and his organization?

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The Takeaway

State Department Flags Pakistani Human Rights Abuses

Thursday, December 30, 2010

According to a recent report from the State Department, Pakistani security forces are illegally rounding up political activists and unarmed fighters. In the last decade, thousands of people have been held without charges, tortured and killed, the report says. Many of those detained are members of the Baluchistan separatist group, which has battled the Pakistani government for independence for decades. The State Department report marks a new push by the Obama administration to urge Pakistan to address human rights abuses.

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The Takeaway

Your Take: What Should Replace the Terror Alert System?

Thursday, November 25, 2010

The Department of Homeland Security is recommending a more specific system to inform the public of potential threats. And we’ve been asking for your suggestions of what to replace it with. And you delivered in droves.

Dagel from Fairhaven, Mass. said:
“How about using characters from horror movies? It’s going to be a Jason kind of day today when you’re traveling.”

Aaron Champion called from Oklahoma, City to suggest:
"I think we should convert the terror alert system to the varying levels of humiliation you have to go through at the airport screening facility.”

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Ghailani Verdict

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Ahmed Ghailani, the first Guantanamo detainee to be tried by a U.S. civilian court, was acquitted on all but one of more than 280 charges Wednesday by a jury in U.S. federal court in Manhattan. Karen Greenberg, executive director of the Center on Law and Security at NYU Law School, discusses the Ghailani mixed verdict and how it plays into the ongoing debate about civilian versus military trials.

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The Takeaway

After Attempted Bombing, Can the Global Economy Afford to Increase Cargo Security?

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

The bombs found in UPS and FedEx packages last week have raised the issue of security screening for international cargo carriers. Since August 1st, 2010, all cargo loaded onto passenger planes in the U.S. is subject  to mandatory screening, but that isn't the case in many other countries. Only some of the packages traveling on cargo-only flights, on the other hand, are generally screened. Should UPS, FedEx and other shippers be doing more to safeguard air transport?

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The Takeaway

Pakistan and Washington Prepare for High Level Talks

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Is Pakistan our ally or is it home to our greatest threat? President Obama and his national security team, who already grapple with that question on a daily basis, will be examining it again as high level Pakistani officials arrive in Washington later this week. Pakistan's foreign minister, Shah Mahmood Qureshi, and General Ashfaq Kayani, the head of Pakistan's military who is thought to be the most powerful man in the country, head to Washington at a particularly contentious time of U.S.-Pakistan relations.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Significant Delays

Thursday, October 07, 2010

Josh Gerstein, courts and transparency reporter for Politico.com, and Benjamin Weiser, Federal courthouse reporter at The New York Times, talk about yesterday's delay in the trial of Ahmed Ghailani, and what it might mean for New York and the plans to try terror cases in civilian court.

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The Takeaway

Ahmed Ghailani Trial Begins

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

The first civilian trial for a former Guantánamo Bay detainee begins today. Tanzanian-born Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani is accused of bombing embassies in Tanzania and Kenya in 1998, killing hundreds.

WNYC Reporter Ailsa Chang is covering the trial.

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The Takeaway

Trial to Begin for Youngest Guantánamo Detainee

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Jury selection is set to get underway today in his controversial trial of 23-year-old Canadian Omar Khadr, the only Westerner remaining at the Guantánamo Bay detention center in Cuba. Khadr currently faces five charges of war crimes, including the fatal wounding of U.S. Delta Force soldier Christopher Speer in Afghanistan. Khadr has been imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay since the age of 15. This trial is the first war crimes trial under the Obama administration. 

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The Takeaway

14 Indicted For Aiding Somali Terrorist Group

Friday, August 06, 2010

Fourteen people, mostly of Somali descent, have been accused of providing support to the Somali terrorist group al-Shabab. That’s the group that claimed responsibility for a bombing last month that killed 76 people who were watching a World Cup match in Uganda, including an American aid worker. Al-Shabab have declared war on the United Nations and humanitarian organizations in Somalia. A handful of people have been arrested in recent weeks on charges they were leaving to aid the terrorist group.

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The Takeaway

Ugandan Bombings Mark an Inland Move for Radical Somali Militia

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Explosions in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, killed at least 74 soccer fans watching the World Cup final on Sunday. Eyewitnesses described the carnage: chairs covered in blood and abandoned cars littering the scene.

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The Takeaway

Faisal Shahzad Pleads Guilty to 10 Terror-Related Charges

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Faisal Shahzad, the Pakistani-born American citizen who attempted to blow up a car in Times Square, pleaded guilty yesterday to ten terror-related charges. “I want to plead guilty 100 times over,” said Shahzad in Manhattan federal court. He went on to describe his training in Pakistan and the events leading up to the attempted bombing.

We talk with WNYC reporter Ailsa Chang, who was in the courtroom.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Upholds Ban On Supporting Terrorist Groups

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Yesterday the Supreme Court upheld a law, adopted in 1996, that bans Americans from providing support to foreign terrorist groups. Up to fifteen years in prison is the penalty for contributing cash, weapons, training, personnel, and expert advice or assistance to any foreign group that the United States deems as terrorists. 

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The Takeaway

More Homegrown Terror? Americans Arrested on Way to Egypt

Monday, June 07, 2010

Two American citizens were arrested yesterday at New York's JFK airport. The young men from New Jersey, both in their 20s, had been under surveillance since 2006. Law enforcement laid low, gathered evidence and waited until this weekend when the two men were trying to board separate flights to Egypt, and then to Somalia where they were allegedly planning to join al-Shabab, a terrorist group allied with al-Qaida.

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The Takeaway

Citizenship and Security in the Wake of the Times Square Terror Attempt

Thursday, May 06, 2010

Senator Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) has called for Americans charged with terror crimes to be stripped of their citizenship. However, there's no precedent for stripping an American of his or her citizenship and the law says that the U.S. cannot use the revocation of citizenship as punishment. The issue is murky and we turn to Peter Spiro, a professor of law at Temple University and Dr. Azima Khan, an immigrant from Pakistan who recently received her citizenship, join us to talk about the case.

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The Takeaway

Times Square Bomb: Low-Tech, but Potentially Deadly

Monday, May 03, 2010

New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said yesterday that the bomb found in an S.U.V. Saturday evening in Times Square was amateurish and flawed, but could have been deadly.

 

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The Takeaway

Aiming to Stop Black Market Nuclear Traffic

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

President Obama's nuclear security summit, held in Washington, D.C. and hosting 46 world leaders, wrapped up last night with a request from the president. He called on all the nations present to cooperate in keeping nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists.

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The Takeaway

After Subway Bombings, Russia's Next Move

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

It's been over 24 hours since the terrorist attack in Moscow, where two female suicide bombers targeted subways, killing almost 40 people.

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