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Teen Drivers

The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Do You Text and Drive? Be Honest.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Werner Herzog released a new documentary on the dangers of texting while driving called "From One Second to the Next." Call in with your tips on how to resist the temptation to text while you're driving, and how you teach your teenage drivers to do the same. And if you can't resist the temptation, tell us what makes it so hard to change your habits.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Test Scores; Title IX on Campus; Changes in Suburbia

Thursday, August 08, 2013

New York State raised standards on 3rd-8th grade exams and predictably, test scores sank. WNYC’s Beth Fertig explains why federal officials are happy with them and what this means for Mayor Bloomberg’s legacy.  Plus: voter turnout and how to register to vote; The Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights investigates treatment of sexual assault on college campuses; Noam Scheiber of The New Republic on the end of big law; changes in suburbia; and changes with teenagers – a new survey shows fewer teens are getting drivers’ licenses. 

Transportation Nation

Teen Drivers Learn Dangers of Texting Behind the Wheel Through Simulation Exercise

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Texting and driving simulation vehicle in front of Houston City Hall. Photo by Gail Delaughter/KUHF

(Houston, TX -- Gail Delaughter, KUHF)   The texting and driving simulators are like the ones used to simulate drunk driving, except in this one you're constantly glancing between the computer-generated roadway on your simulation goggles, and the phone keypad you're clasping under the steering wheel.

Like in any video game, a loud crash signals you've messed up. Come to find out, I was on the wrong side of the road the entire exercise.

My simulation was conducted by Dylan Richardson with Peers Awareness, a firm that puts on simulation exercises for young drivers.  He says no one gets it right.   "All people have some type of infraction, or they will crash."

A local TV station brought along two sisters who drive race cars. Even they couldn't do it.

The event in front of Houston City Hall was sponsored by AT&T to mark the 100 deadliest days for teens to be on the road, the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day.   AT&T Regional Vice-President Alice Aanstoos says a new driver with a smart phone is a dangerous combination, considering it takes about five seconds to look at a text.  She says the simulator ride proves to be a rude awakening for teens who think they're experts at multi-tasking behind the wheel.

"Because they realize that, again, just one split second from looking away from the road can cause troubles. We haven't seen a single person actually pass this simulator test without either some sort of accident, a wreck, or some kind of infraction."

Aanstoos says it's not just teens who text while driving. She says adults do it too, and often they're texting their own kids while sitting at a red light.

"I hear a lot of them say it's okay to just check their phone and read a text at a red light or something because they're obviously not moving, so it's okay, right?  But that's dangerous too."

You can listen to the KUHF story here.

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