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New Tech City

Putting heart and the human experience into tech coverage, WNYC's New Tech City with Manoush Zomorodi investigates what all the data, constant connectivity, and perpetual "upgrades" really mean for daily life. Follow @newtechcity and subscribe to the podcast for stories of discovery on how the digital age is altering our brains, relationships, and values. 

The Allure Of Anonymous Confessional Apps 'Secret' And 'Whisper'

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Apps like Secret and Whisper are designed to maximize sharing and minimize risk because the messages are anonymous. Could they end up helping whistle-blowers and shaking up the workplace?

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Computer Love: Beats Music Wants To Be Your Everything

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Ann Powers says that for the music lover searching for an immersive streaming service, newcomer Beats Music comes close to offering the complete package.

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The Takeaway

Why Your Late 30s Are the Best Time for Breakthroughs

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Albert Einstein once said that "a person who has not made his great contribution to science before the age of 30 will never do so." Genius may have come early for Einstein, but according to a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research, most scientists don't achieve their first big breakthrough until their late thirties. David Shenk, author of "The Genius in All of Us: New Insights Into Genetics, Talent, and IQ," discusses the study and its implications.

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On The Media

We Might Be Able To Predict the Future Using Social Media. But Should We?

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

A new study from MIT found a way to retroactively predict the 2013 coup in Egypt. Study author Nathan Kallus plugged in 300,000 web sources from before the coup, scanned them for keywords and sentiment analysis, and was able to graph a prediction for when the coup would happen.

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New Tech City

The Story Behind the Poster on Every Tech Startup's Wall

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

It's a commentary on the ethos behind innovation today, and it reveals just how much luck and self-love are embraced in the startup world. New Tech City explains the ubiquitous "Holstee Manifesto."

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Order Up! Food Businesses Find An Appetite For Bitcoin

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

From a Subway sandwich shop to a Peruvian chicken food truck, customers have a growing number of options for satisfying their hunger with bitcoins. For food vendors, accepting the virtual currency offers substantial financial benefits — and risks, too.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Facial Recognition Technology: What Is It Used For?

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

New York Times reporter Natasha Singer looks at facial recognition technology, and whether consumers should be able to decide who uses their biometric data. Her article “When No One Is Just a Face in the Crowd” appeared in the New York Times February 1.

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On The Media

The Creepy New App That Lets People Listen in On Your Conversations

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Why leave eavesdropping on phone calls to law enforcement? With the new app Crowdpilot, you can invite anyone to listen in.

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Jazzpunk: A Spy Game Full Of Jokes, Blokes And Cold War Tropes

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Jazzpunk is a quirky adventure comedy game chock full of charm, humor and more pop culture references than watching VH1. Nearly every object and character you encounter along the way is an opportunity to make you laugh. But you get to deliver the punch line.

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On The Media

The Internet Has Brought Thousands of People Together to Play Pokemon

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

In its purest and most noble form, the internet is an experiment in community building. It allows people who would have no reason to interact in the real world to come together to work toward, or in some cases against, a common goal. In the case of Twitch Plays Pokemon, it allows tens of thousands of people to get together to play a game of Pokemon Red for the old-school Nintendo Game Boy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and You

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

David Carr, media columnist and culture reporter for the New York Times, discusses Comcast's acquisition of Time Warner Cable and what it means for regular t.v. watchers, for cord cutters, and for the industry.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Andy Borowitz Fills In; a Closer Look at ADHD; Andy Statman Performs Live; Caregiving; Facial Recognition Technology

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate today. First, behavioral neurologist Dr. Richard Saul argues that there's more to ADHD than we know. Andy Statman performs live and talks about his latest album "Superstring Theory." We'll discuss the complex issues of caring for a sick or aging loved one. And Natasha Singer explains how facial recognition technology works and what it's used for.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Fracking and Air Pollution; New Faces on Wall Street; World Science U

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Today's show is guest-hosted by WNYC's Anna Sale. Find out more about Anna here.

Inside Climate News is investigating the effect of fracking on air quality in some parts of Texas. Reporter Lisa Song details the pollution and health problems of residents in the area. Plus: Kevin Roose, New York Magazine columnist and author of “Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street’s Post-Crash Recruits,” reports on the new faces of Wall Street, plus science education is coming to the masses via the Internet.

The Takeaway

Can You Trust The Media?

Monday, February 17, 2014

Over the last few years, technology has transformed how we understand and consume the news. A few decades ago, most of us read the morning paper or tuned in to the evening news, but those habits have changed with the growth of the internet and cable. As the news audience splinters, author Alain de Botton worries that the public isn't getting the whole picture. In his new book, "The News: A User's Manual," he argues that we need better training on how to consume and decode the news.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What Does Generation Like Want?

Monday, February 17, 2014

Doug Rushkoff explores how young Americans use the social web, and how corporations and marketers are trying to reach them.

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How Most Anyone Can Find Photos Of Secret Government Sites

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Just by searching online, researchers found the buildings where the North Korean military is believed to be building launchers for ballistic missiles. Google Earth and cheap satellite images make this kind of intelligence gathering possible for most anyone with an Internet connection.

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An App On The Search For The Secret To Happiness

Saturday, February 15, 2014

An app that helps researchers measure happiness? It's here! NPR's Guy Raz from the Ted Radio Hour speaks with social scientist Matt Killingsworth, who has developed the Happy App.

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Here's One More Reason To Play Video Games: Beating Dyslexia

Friday, February 14, 2014

People with dyslexia take longer to alternate their attention between visual and audio cues, researchers say. That's particularly true if they have to attend to a sound after seeing something. That difference may provide clues to better treatments for dyslexia.

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The Takeaway

How Do They Do That? Inside the Physics of The 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Friday, February 14, 2014

The Winter Olympics is a spectacular combination of low temperature chemistry, physics, athletics, pure guts, and absolute beauty and grace. Beyond the costumes, the equipment and the music, we wanted to find out just how Olympic athletes do what they do. So we're pleased to introduce our series, "How Do They Do That?" Here we explore the physics of the Sochi Games. Our friend Eric Goff is the chair of the physics department at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports." He explains how the athletes flip, fly and hit the ice at high speeds.

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On The Media

An App Promises to Help You Write Like Hemingway

Friday, February 14, 2014

Hemingway is a new app that invites you to submit your writing into a text box where it'll be graded based on it's Hemingway-esqueness. 

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