Streams

 

Technology

Edit Bucket

New Tech City

Putting heart and the human experience into tech coverage, WNYC's New Tech City with Manoush Zomorodi investigates what all the data, constant connectivity, and perpetual "upgrades" really mean for daily life. Follow @newtechcity and subscribe to the podcast for stories of discovery on how the digital age is altering our brains, relationships, and values. 

All Things Considered

Using A 3-D Version Of Rodin's Hands To Understand Anatomy

Monday, June 23, 2014

Dr. James Chang of Stanford University uses hands sculpted by Rodin, together with 3-D technology, to create an experience of augmented reality for his students and surgery trainees.

Comment

Be A Varsity Player ... In Video Games?

Monday, June 23, 2014

A private university elects to make a popular video game into an official varsity sport. Marketing ploy or sign of the future?

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Online Tracking Is Getting Creepier

Monday, June 23, 2014

So if you feel watched while on the web, you're not being totally paranoid - most likely, you're right. 

Comments [16]

Morning Edition

Baltimore's Water Wheel Keeps On Turning, Pulling In Tons Of Trash

Monday, June 23, 2014

It looks like a cross between an old grain mill, a covered wagon and a spaceship: a giant, solar-powered wheel that sucks in bags, bottles and other detritus from Baltimore's Inner Harbor.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Could LG and Its Opponents Compromise in the Palisades?

Monday, June 23, 2014

Electronics giant LG plans to build its new US headquarters near the Palisades in New Jersey, which opponents say will destroy the beautiful view. Local officials are now calling for a compromise between LG and its environmental opponents. Ned Sullivan, President of Scenic Hudson and a member of the steering committee Protect the Palisades, a coalition of organizations and individuals dedicated to preserving the Hudson River Palisades, discusses what this compromise might look like.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

From the Outside Looking In: Online Tracking, an Unconventional Politician, Staying Stubborn

Monday, June 23, 2014

On today’s show: ProPublica’s Julia Angwin explains how online marketers are gathering more of your offline data to create increasingly intrusive and targeted ads. Then Jón Gnarr explains how he went from launching a political party in order to satirize Iceland’s political system to being elected mayor of Reykjavík. We’ll find out how Detroit went from making cars to producing a bomber an hour during World War II. And constitutional law professor Richard H. Weisberg praises intransigence in an age of increasing flexibility.

All Things Considered

With Memories And Online Maps, A Man Finds His 'Way Home'

Sunday, June 22, 2014

When Saroo Brierley was 4, he hopped on the wrong train in rural India, losing his way and his family. But as he recounts in A Long Way Home, Google Earth helped him return decades later.

Comment

Redefining What It Means To Talk In The Age Of Smartphones

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Why talk when we can text? For many, our phones are a habit — a bad one — and only a small number of us realize it. Our voices are a way to express and define ourselves; a text message can't do that.

Comment

All Things Considered

On Display At Video Game Showcase: A Struggle For Diversity

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Over the years, the video game industry has been hammered by questions about a lack of diversity, disappointing narratives and ever-imminent virtual reality. To see how the industry is coming, NPR's Arun Rath takes a tour of E3: The Electronic Entertainment Expo.

Comment

National Park Service Temporarily Bans Drones In National Parks

Saturday, June 21, 2014

The Park Service said it made the decision after several drones disturbed the peace at different parks. The agency will later propose permanent regulation.

Comment

Tech Week: Yo, The Amazon Fire Phone And Apple's iWatch?

Saturday, June 21, 2014

An app based around a single word, a phone from Amazon that helps you buy stuff from Amazon and details about Apple's expected wrist candy. All that and more in the week's tech news.

Comment

How To Catch A Chess Cheater

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Ken Regan could be called a chess detective. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the computer scientist and chess master whose algorithm reveals whether players are cheating at the game.

Comment

On The Media

Ok, Ok. We'll Talk About "Yo."

Friday, June 20, 2014

This week, the tech press did backflips over an app called "Yo." It's a messaging app that allows users to text the word "Yo." Nothing else. Just the word "Yo." Let that sink in for a second before we move on.

It was heralded as geniusit was derided as stupid. It was the subject of a conversation about meaning and subtext in online communication. It was given the avant garde treatment it deserved. Disregarding what was written about it, yo has cornered the internet's fickle attention long enough to enter the top 10 in the App store. By any metric, that's a victory.

We didn't write about it. Mostly because we thought there wasn't much to say that hadn't already been said. I think I acknowledged its existence on my twitter feed. Yo.

Read More

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

House Votes to Defund NSA Spying Programs

Friday, June 20, 2014

The Republican controlled House of Representatives took a surprising step to curb the federal government's power by voting to defund two key NSA programs. But the bill still has to pass the Senate.

Comments [1]

TED Radio Hour

Does Technology Make Us More Honest?

Friday, June 20, 2014

Who hasn't sent a text message saying "I'm on my way" when it wasn't true? But some technology might actually force us to be more honest, says psychologist Jeff Hancock.

Comment

Morning Edition

Is A Threat On Facebook Real? Supreme Court Will Weigh In

Friday, June 20, 2014

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case involving perceived death threats on Facebook. The court and the company could have starkly different approaches to identifying credible threats.

Comment

On The Media

ISIS on the TV Screen

Friday, June 20, 2014

As ISIS storms through Iraq, its allies and enemies wage an information war on television. Elliott Colla, professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Georgetown and author of the crime novel, Baghdad Central, has been watching the events unfold onscreen alongside his wife's Iraqi family, who recently resettled from Baghdad to Amman. Colla reads part of his essay, “Watching ISIS on TV,” published in the online magazine Jadaliyya, and talks with Brooke about the origins of Iraq's frenzied media landscape.

Comment

On The Media

Threats in Cyberspace

Friday, June 20, 2014

The Supreme Court will hear a case involving Anthony Elonis, a Pennsylvania man serving jail time for posting death threats against his wife on Facebook. Elonis says he didn’t mean it literally, and it’s up to the High Court to decide if that distinction matters. Brooke talks with Slate's Dahlia Lithwick about the impact this case could have on how violent speech online is viewed in the eyes of the law.

Comments [3]

On The Media

ISIS's Media Offensive, Online Death Threats, and What NPR Is (and Isn't)

Friday, June 20, 2014

ISIS's Twitter and television offensive, the effects of language on your morals, and what NPR is and what it isn't. 

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Iraq's Unravelling, Lawmaker Reacts to Detention of Immigrant Children, and An Abortion Rom Com

Friday, June 20, 2014

1. Iraqi Ambassador: Iraq Conflict Could Go Global | 2. What Can 300 Military Advisers Achieve in Iraq? | 3. Arizona Lawmaker Reacts to Detention of Hundreds of Immigrant Children | 4. New Rom Com 'Obvious Child' Tackles Abortion Taboo