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Taliban

The Takeaway

Manhunt Underway After Taliban Prison Break

Monday, April 25, 2011

Almost five hundred Taliban militants have escaped from the main prison in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Insurgents say they spent months digging a tunnel into the jail which through which almost a third of the prison population escaped. This includes about a hundred Taliban commanders. One escapee said it took him half an hour to crawl to freedom. Afghan politician and former MP, Daoud Sultanzai says that this "shows the fragile state of affairs of our security apparatus" in Afghanistan.

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The Takeaway

Inside the Mind of a Suicide Bomber

Monday, April 18, 2011

The BBC's correspondent Aleem Maqbool spoke with a 14-year-old schoolboy who blew off his own arm as he attempted to blow up a shrine in Punjab province in Pakistan this month. Umar Fidai's bomb didn't fully detonate and the police shot him in the arm before he could detonate the grenade he was holding. His story reveals how the Taliban convinces young men to drop out of school and carry out suicide missions.

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The Takeaway

Taliban Claims Responsibility for Attack on Afghanistan Defense Ministry

Monday, April 18, 2011

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for an attack on Afghanistan's heavily fortified Defense Ministry, which killed two and wounded seven others. The attacker was reportedly killed by bodyguards just outside the Defense Minster's office. This is the beginning of what the Taliban has called their "spring offensive." Ray Rivera, foreign correspondent for The New York Times reports from Kabul.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Talking to the Taliban

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Steve Coll, president of the New America Foundation and contributor to the New Yorker, discusses his latest New Yorker article, which reveals that the U.S. has been in direct talks with the Taliban. He also reacts to the latest news from the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Pakistan's Shaky Democracy, Morning Headlines

Monday, January 03, 2011

Political changes in Pakistan continue to shake the country's already fragile democracy, alongside security concerns and the threat of the Taliban. 

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Keeping the Taliban Out of Afghanistan, Morning Headlines

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Some of the tactics of keeping the Taliban out used by U.S. forces appear to be working in Afghanistan. But will the advances made recently keep the Taliban from a resurgence when the allied forces leave? 

 

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The Takeaway

Assessing Afghanistan from the Northern Provinces

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Questions over whether the surge in Afghanistan is working are rising again, as are insurgents in northern Afghanistan, just as a new report out by the Pentagon highlights some progress in the south. One of the larger questions: Is that progress in one region coming at the expense of progress in others?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Surviving the Taliban

Friday, December 10, 2010

Independent journalist and filmmaker Paul Refsdal describes his experiences embedding with the Taliban, who then kidnapped him and held him hostage for six days. He is the focus of the new CNN documentary "Taliban."

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The Takeaway

Talks Crumble Over Impostor Claiming to Be Senior Taliban Commander

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

For months, secret talks between Taliban and Afghan leaders have been inching along towards an agreement to end the war in Afghanistan. They've been helped by senior Taliban commander Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansour. But it turns out he was an impostor. We're joined by Professor Christine Fair, from the Center for Peace and Security Studies at Georgetown University, to learn more about the story. 

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The Takeaway

Mixed Messages on Afghanistan from the Taliban and US Security Team

Thursday, November 18, 2010

When America ended its second-longest war in Southeast Asia, we knew who our opponents were, and who to sign a peace agreement with. But in the current war in Afghanistan — now the longest in American history — those lines in the sand are much more difficult to draw. How do we make sure we’re not sending out mixed messages, as we reconcile our continuing commitment to Afghanistan with the coming American military draw down? And how do we come to terms with the fact that we're hearing mixed messages from the Taliban?

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The Takeaway

Making Bread, Making Allies: Efforts to Reintegrate the Taliban

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

In Afghanistan, our partners the BBC have gained rare access to an American prison for Taliban fighters. The BBC's Paul Wood spent time at the Parwan facility and explains how efforts are being made to ready Taliban members to re-enter society by teaching them useful skills, including bread making. 

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, October 18, 2010

David Sanger joins Brian Zumhagen to discuss the campaign trail and a big debate among Demcrats.

The Takeaway

For Some Voters in Afghanistan, A Choice Between Life and Death

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Election day is quickly approaching in Afghanistan, and who to cast their ballot for won't be the only decision voters will have to make. Afghans will also need to decide whether to vote at all given that in some districts the decision could mean the difference between life and death. Voters in areas like Ghanzi fear mutilation and beheadings from the Taliban if they decide to go out and vote. The BBC's Ian Pannell traveled to Ghanzi; we hear from a voter, a candidate and a Taliban leader with whom he spoke.

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The Takeaway

On Patrol with the 101st Airborne in Afghanistan

Friday, September 10, 2010

The U.S. Army's legendary 101st Airborne division has arrived in Afghanistan. They are the final wave of the 30,000 troop surge. The U.S. hopes that the surge will help to turn the tide against the Taliban.

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The Takeaway

Pakistani Officials Captured Taliban Leader to Stop Peace Talks

Monday, August 23, 2010

In January, Pakistani officials arrested a top Taliban operational commander, Abdul Ghani Baradar. At the time Pakistan officials said they they had no idea who Baradar was when they arrested him and that they were surprised to find out that he was Taliban's second in command. However, Baradar was a key player in peace talks that were going on between the Taliban and the Afghan government. Foreign correspondent for The New York Times, Dexter Filkins broke the story and joins us with the details.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Aid Gap May Offer US an Opportunity to Restore Relations

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Pakistan’s floods are producing some mind-boggling numbers: 3.5 million children are at risk of disease, and roughly one-fifth of the country is under water. 20 million people have been displaced from their homes by the ongoing deluge.   

And some more disturbing numbers: the UN has asked for $460 million in emergency aid. To date, donor nations have only pledged 35 percent of that amount. A little less than half the donations - roughly $76 million - has come from the United States.

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The Takeaway

Taliban Stones Young Couple to Death in Afghanistan

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

For the first time in nearly a decade of war in Afghanistan, the Taliban has executed a young couple by stoning for having a relationship out of wedlock.

Carried out on Sunday by townspeople and even family members of the couple who tricked them into returning after trying to elope, the execution was the latest in a string of harsh punishments by the former regime, which include lashing and amputation. Already some in the country are calling the execution appropriate. Just a week ago a group of 350 religious scholars meeting with government officials called for more punishment under Sharia law.

Are we seeing a resurgence of the Taliban’s extreme punishment, in a long and painful war that was meant to eradicate it? What does the recent violence say about our efforts, and about the Taliban in Afghanistan?

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The Takeaway

'Three Cups of Tea' Author Urges Education in Afghanistan, Not War

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Since 1993, Greg Mortenson has dedicated his life to building schools, mostly for girls, in the mountainous regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Author of The New York Times best-seller, "Three Cups of Tea," Greg Mortenson, approaches diplomacy in Afghanistan through education and working with village elders. And even as a strong advocate against the war there, he and his book have been warmly embraced by top ranking members of the U.S. command in Afghanistan, who have turned to Mortenson for advice on how to approach locals there.

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The Takeaway

WikiLeaks Founder Defends Document Release

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

92,000 cryptic reports that offer an hour-by-hour, and sometimes a minute-by-minute, look at the U.S. Army’s actions in Afghanistan were leaked this Sunday by WikiLeaks, a European news organization devoted to uncovering secrets of all kinds. The documents were shared with The Guardian, The New York Times, and Der Spiegel weeks ago, and made public in those papers, and on the Internet, on Sunday.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, July 26, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on how 91,000 top secret military documents were leaked.