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Taliban

The Takeaway

Meeting in Bonn, Germany on the Future of Afghanistan

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Almost 1,000 delegates from Afghanistan, NATO, and neighboring countries met in Bonn, Germany to discuss the future of Afghanistan. The talks happened in the context of the planned withdrawal of foreign troops from Afghanistan by 2014. The meeting had a sense of deja vu; 10 years ago, in this same city, in the same hotel, Afghan leaders met to discuss the future of Afghanistan. Back then, it was just months after the 9/11 attacks, the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, and the fall of the Taliban. 

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The Takeaway

Al-Qaeda Claims Responsibility for Kidnapping of US Aid Worker

Friday, December 02, 2011

Warren Weinstein is a veteran aid worker who was kidnapped by armed men in Lahore almost four months ago. Ayman al-Zawahiri and the Pakistan branch of al-Qaeda have claimed responsibility for this, and created a list of demands for his release. Among them are the end of U.S. airstrikes in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen, as well as the release of members of Osama bin Laden's family. However, it remains unclear if al-Qaeda actually has Weinstein in their custody.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Attacks in Afghanistan, Morning Headlines

Monday, October 31, 2011

Over the weekend two attacks in Afghanistan proved some of the deadliest in that country in over two months. In Kabul, a bombing left 17 people dead, and some officials pointing beyond the Taliban and towards a growing threat: the Haqqani network, which is based in neighboring Pakistan. That and this morning's other top headlines. 

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Accused of Secretly Supporting Taliban

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

The increasingly fraught relationship between the United States and Pakistan is under even greater scrutiny after new revelations showing Pakistan has continually supported and trained the Taliban in Afghanistan for the last decade. A BBC investigation alleges that Pakistan has secretly armed and trained the enemy in Afghanistan while professing to be a U.S. ally. David Loyn, correspondent for the BBC, filed this report.

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The Takeaway

Haqqani Leader Denies Killing Rabbani

Monday, October 03, 2011

Siraj Haqqani, a key leader of the Afghan militant group known as the Haqqani network, told the BBC over the weekend it was not responsible for the assassination of Burhanuddin Rabbani, the head of Afghanistan's High Peace Council. The Haqqanis, who in recent weeks have been blamed for an attack on the U.S. embassy in Kabul, have been described as "the Sopranos of the Afghanistan war" by The New York Times. The U.S. has long accused the Haqqanis of working for Pakistan's spy agency, the ISI.

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The Takeaway

Burhanuddin Rabbani, Leader of Afghan Peace Council, Assassinated

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

A suicide bomber in Afghanistan on Tuesday killed Burhanuddin Rabbani, former president of Afghanistan and leader of the High Peace Council. Rabbani was in the process of negotiating an end to the war with the Taliban. The assassination is a devastating blow to the Afghan peace process, and the future of security in the region.

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The Takeaway

Taliban Attacks US Embassy in Kabul

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

After 20 hours of fighting, Afghan forces killed the last insurgents who carried out a complex attack against the U.S. embassy, NATO headquarters, and police buildings in Kabul that started Tuesday. Seven people, including four policemen, died, and nine insurgents were killed. The Taliban initially took credit for the attack, though an insurgent group called the Haqqani network is believed to be responsible. The attack comes as the U.S. has begun to withdraw troops from the region. The attack still left many terrified, and wondering whether the Afghan government will be able to secure their stronghold within the capital city.

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The Takeaway

Live Update From Kabul

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

American officials have confirmed a rocket attack on the U.S. embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan this morning. Authorities say at least four Afghans are wounded, but there have not been any reports of deaths. Ray Rivera of The New York Times reports on the latest from on the ground in Kabul.

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The Takeaway

Taliban Insurgents Attack US Embassy in Kabul

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

The Taliban is taking responsibility for coordinated attack on the U.S. embassy and the headquarters for NATO's International Assistance Security Force in Kabul, Afghanistan this morning. Insurgents are said to be firing rockets from a half-completed building near the embassy. On its website Tuesday morning, the Taliban ran a statement saying "Operation Martyrdom" had begun. Bilal Sawary of the BBC reports on the latest from Kabul.

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The Takeaway

Assessing Terror Threats 10 Years After 9/11

Monday, September 12, 2011

Federal authorities are still on alert after news of a "specific, credible" terrorist threat for New York City and the District of Columbia broke on Thursday night, as the tenth anniversary of September 11 approached. The memorial service at Ground Zero still went on as promised Sunday, with thousands of people coming to the site to pay tribute to those who died and those who survived in the 9/11 attacks. Meanwhile, on Saturday the Taliban took credit for a suicide bomb attack on NATO forces in eastern Afghanistan, injuring at least 80 people.

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The Takeaway

'Top Secret America': The Hidden Side of Government After 9/11

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

We're talking about the tenth anniversary of 9/11 all this week. And while we’re remembering those we’ve lost, we’re also analyzing the tragedy's aftermath. A new Frontline documentary and investigative book chronicle the proliferation of covert operations and government organizations that began cropping up in the wake of 9/11. Funding for counter-terrorism programs grew exponentially after 9/11. In the documentary, then-White House counter terrorism czar Richard Clarke remembers: "President Bush said to us, in the basement of the White House on the night of 9/11, you have everything you need. And that was true, because as soon as we went to the Congress, they said 'just tell us what you need.' Blank check."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Clemency for Lindh?

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Frank Lindh, father of 'American Taliban' John Walker Lindh, argues that his son should be released from prison and that the original 20-year sentence for fighting with the Taliban in Afghanistan was excessive. 

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The Takeaway

Advances and Uncertainty in Afghanistan

Friday, August 12, 2011

It has been a tragic couple of weeks for U.S. troops in Afghanistan. What is the status of the situation in Afghanistan? Has the Taliban retreated and when can U.S. troops withdraw? Our partners at the BBC talk with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Ryan Crocker about America's long-standing involvement in the region and how we can avoid making the same mistakes that led to 9/11.

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The Takeaway

Helicopter Crash Highlights American Strategy in Afghanistan

Monday, August 08, 2011

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for a helicopter crash on Saturday, which killed 30 American troops in the deadliest day ever for U.S. forces in Afghanistan. The attack took place in the Tangi Valley of Wardak Province, to the west of Kabul, and illustrates how the insurgency is growing from its traditional strongholds and edging toward the capital city.

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The Takeaway

Ahmed Wali Karzai Is Dead: What Is In Store for Kandahar?

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Ahmed Wali Karzai, Afghan President Hamid Karzai's half-brother and head of Afghanistan's Kandahar provincial council, was killed early Tuesday morning at his home. The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the assassination, though their claims remain unconfirmed. Karzai was a powerful figure in Kandahar and his death may result in an unpredictable struggle for power, impacting U.S. goals in the region.

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The Takeaway

Terrorist Attack on Kabul Hotel

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

The Hotel Interncontinental in Kabul, Afghanistan was attacked by gunmen and suicide bombers yesterday. Gun fire was exchanged between the terrorists and police force for many hours, and ended with NATO helicopters shooting and killing three militants on the hotel's roof. The identity of the terrorists has not been confirmed yet, but many believe the Taliban are responsible.

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The Takeaway

At Least 21 Dead After Intercontinental Hotel Attack in Afghanistan

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Last night, at least nine suicide bombers stormed into the Intercontinental Hotel—one of the most premier hotels in Kabul, Afghanistan—in a six-hour attack that early reports say left at least 21 people dead. NATO forces ended the attack by killing three of the bombers. Alissa J. Rubin, a reporter for the New York Times, told us the attackers were anti-government insurgents.

The Takeaway spoke with freelance journalist Bette Dam, who was at the Intercontinental Hotel and spoke of the situation on the ground (her audio above and below). We also spoke with journalist Matthieu Aikins.  

Freelance journalist Matthieu Aikins reports from Kabul: 

Freelance journalist Bette Dam reports on the scene at the Intercontinental Hotel: 

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The Takeaway

If U.S. Troops Leave Afghanistan, Who Are Our Enemies?

Thursday, June 23, 2011

President Obama says he’s withdrawing troops from Afghanistan because they have satisfied their mission. So does that also mean we no longer have enemies there- we find out soon, on The Takeaway.

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The Takeaway

Two Florida Imams Arrested on Charges of Supporting Taliban

Monday, May 16, 2011

Monday afternoon, two Florida imams are scheduled to be arraigned in a federal court in Miami after being arrested for allegedly providing financial support for the Pakistani Taliban. Imam Hafiz Muhammed Sher Ali Khan runs the city's oldest mosque, the Flagler Mosque. He, in addition to his two sons, and three others in Pakistan, were indicted for supporting terrorist organizations in Pakistan. Jay Weaver, federal courts reporter for The Miami Herald, talks about the case and the role of the Khan family in Miami.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Force and Futility in Afghanistan

Monday, May 09, 2011

New Yorker staff writer Jon Lee Anderson discusses the ongoing war in Afghanistan and whether it’s time for coalition forces to leave the country. His article “Force and Futility,” in the May 16 issue of The New Yorker, tells what’s changed—and what has remained the same—in the region of Khost, Afghanistan, since the United States first tried to kill Osama bin Laden there in 1998.

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