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Supreme Court

The Takeaway

Supreme Court Sidesteps Affirmative Action Ruling

Monday, June 24, 2013

The U.S. Supreme Court seems to have avoided a big decision in the affirmative action case, Fisher vs. The University of Texas. The Court essentially issued a non-ruling, sending the case back to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear the case. To find out what this sidestep means, we welcome Kareem Crayton, professor of law at the University of North Carolina Law School.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Emily Bazelon on the Supreme Court's Affirmative Action Ruling

Monday, June 24, 2013

Emily Bazelon, a senior editor at Slate, a contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine, and the Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School, discusses the Supreme Court's ruling on Fisher v. University of Texas.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Supreme Court Rules on Fisher vs. U-Texas: Back to Lower Court

Monday, June 24, 2013

This morning, the Supreme Court announced opinions on a few key cases, including:

  • In the affirmative action case Fisher vs. University of Texas, the court will send the case back to a lower court. SCOTUSBlog reports that this indicates "the majority seems to reaffirm that diversity is a compelling interest if only because that rule was not challenged by the plaintiffs in the case."
  • The court announced that it will hear a case this Fall about the constitutionality of President Obama's recess appointments.
  • Several pro-business rulings on the scope of the Civil Rights Act when it comes to workplace harassment.

We discuss the rulings and the impact with University of Chicago's Geoffrey Stone.

Comments [12]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Politics Roundup; Library Resources; Inside Counterterrorism

Monday, June 24, 2013

Molly Ball, political reporter for The Atlantic, rounds up the political news from Washington, including immigration reform and the Farm Bill. Plus: your local library may have more resources than you thought for both job hunters and entrepreneurs; Philip Mudd, formerly of the CIA and FBI and now research fellow at the New America Foundation, talks about how federal agencies worked together on counterterrorism over the last decade; and the Supreme Court is nearing its deadline to decide major cases – we’ll open the phones to get your analysis and reaction.  

WNYC News

Explainer: The Supreme Court Decision on Affirmative Action

Thursday, June 20, 2013

The Supreme Court ruled Monday on one of the country's most divisive issues — affirmative action. We explain what you need to know.

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WNYC News

Explainer: What the Gay Marriage Rulings Mean for NY, NJ

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The Supreme Court ruled today that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, and dismissed the California Prop 8 case. But what do the rulings mean? We have (some of) the answers.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Today's Supreme Court Opinions: Gene Patenting

Monday, June 17, 2013

The Supreme Court is expected to hand down decisions today on one or more critical cases. Noah Feldman, Harvard law professor, Bloomberg View columnist and author of Cool War: The Future of Global Competition comments on last week's gene patent opinion and offers analysis of today's rulings.

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The Takeaway

Presidential Elections in Iran, Daniel Ellsberg Discusses Snowden, Mozart's Violin Visits The Takeaway

Friday, June 14, 2013

Daniel Ellsberg Discusses Snowden N.S.A. Leak | Ambivalence Among Iranian Voters Ahead of Elections | Mozart Never Made it to the U.S., but his Violin Finally Has | Patents On Genes Ruled Unconstitutional | New Movie Releases: "The Bling Ring," "This is the End," "Man of Steel" | Chemical Weapons Confirmed in Syria | Lessons Learned From Losing a Father

WNYC News

Supreme Court: Human Gene Can't be Patented

Thursday, June 13, 2013

The US Supreme Court has ruled that pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies cannot patent a human gene, even if they’re the first to discover it.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Ruling: Gene Patent Compromise

Thursday, June 13, 2013

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled today that naturally occurring human genes can not be patented. All nine justices agreed that while naturally occurring D.N.A. cannot be patented, synthetic D.N.A. can. The case at hand involves Myriad Genetics, the company that patented the BCRA-1 and BCRA-2 genes, which indicate an increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Robert Blackburn is a former Vice President and Chief Patent Counsel of Chiron Corporation, an American multinational biotechnology firm.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Background on Gene Patenting and Today's Supreme Court Decision

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Earlier today, the Supreme Court ruled, in a unanimous decision, that human genes can not be patented. The decision will shaped medical research in the decades to come. To find out more about gene patenting, we've collected our interviews on how it works and why the US Patent Office had already offered tens of thousands patents on genes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Peter Neufeld of the Innocence Project on the Supreme Court's DNA Collection Ruling

Thursday, June 13, 2013

What does the ruling mean?

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Allows Police to Collect DNA Samples After Arrests

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld the practice of taking DNA samples from people arrested in felony cases, even if they are not charged. The ruling Maryland v. King was made in a 5-4 decision. On shows like Law and Order and CSI, DNA evidence is depicted as the kind of conclusive evidence that can swiftly make or break cases. In real life, however, it's a little more messy. Gregory Laskowski, a criminologist and consultant to the CBS series CSI, explains.

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The Takeaway

Bradley Manning Court-Martial Begins, Teens and Online Privacy, Higher Education Moves Online

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Pushing for More Transparency in Bradley Manning Trial | Supreme Court Allows Police to Collect DNA Samples After Arrests | The Coming Revolution in Higher Ed | What Adults Can Learn from Teens About Online Privacy | President Obama Expected to Nominate 3 to U.S. Court of Appeals | Black ...

The Takeaway

Supreme Court to Decide Five Landmark Cases This Month

Monday, June 03, 2013

By the end of this month we could be living in a very different United States. That’s because decisions will be coming down in five landmark cases before the Supreme Court. At stake: affirmative action, voting rights, gene patenting, and same-sex marriage. Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University and President of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, explains the cultural significance of these historic cases.

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Radiolab

Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl

Thursday, May 30, 2013

This is the story of a three-year-old girl and the highest court in the land. The Supreme Court case Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl is a legal battle that has entangled a biological father, a heart-broken couple, and the tragic history of Native American children taken from their families.

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Comments [178]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Previewing Big Decisions at the Supreme Court

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Adam Liptak, the Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times, previews the big cases the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on before the end of the term in June.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Law and Politics

Monday, May 20, 2013

Jeffrey Toobin, staff writer for The New Yorker, CNN legal analyst, and author of (soon in paperback) The Oath: the Obama White House and the Supreme Court (Anchor, 2013) talks about the stop-and-frisk lawsuit, the IRS vs. 501(c)(4)'s, Eric Holder on the hot seat, and other national legal news.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Impact of the Roberts Court

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Marcia Coyle, chief Washington correspondent for The National Law Journal, frequent guest on the PBS NewsHour, and author of The Roberts Court: The Struggle for the Constitution, looks at the ideological divides on the Supreme Court and how they play out on cases involving guns, health care, corporate "citizenship" and racial preferences.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sandra Day O'Connor's Doubts on Bush v. Gore

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor has said that she has doubts about whether the court should have taken up Bush v. Gore. Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for the New York Times, explains what her comments tell us about public opinion and the Supreme Court, the decision in Bush v. Gore, and what it means for potential future cases.

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